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Earl Weaver

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August 11, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Former Baltimore Orioles manager Earl Weaver suffered a heart attack near his home in Florida last week, a spokesman for the Hall of Famer told Bloomsberg News Service. Weaver's family has asked that details surrounding the heart attack and his current condition not be released. "Right now he has undergone a lot of testing," said Dick Gordon, a representative for Weaver. "I don't think it's fair to say more than that. " Weaver, who will turn 68 Friday, managed the Orioles for 17 seasons, leading the team to a 1,480-1,060 record from 1968 to '82 and 1985 to '86. The Orioles won six American League East Division titles, four pennants and the 1970 World Series.
SPORTS
May 10, 2011
EARL WEAVER liked to argue, especially with umpires. But the former Baltimore Orioles manager, who is 80, doesn't want his family battling in a similar fashion after he's gone. So he's auctioning off a good portion of the baseball mementos he's acquired throughout the years. "I have four children. They have children, and their children have children," Weaver told the Associated Press. "I don't know how to divide whatever memorabilia there is among them. " The way Weaver sees it, it's easier to divvy up a pile of cash than a pile of rings, bats, balls and the like.
SPORTS
March 6, 1996 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Earl Weaver kicked enough dirt on umpires in 17 years of managing to bury some of them. His analytical mind and game-situation concentration remain the standard by which other managers are judged. But yesterday, Earl didn't manage very well. He was on the ninth green of The Grand Palms Golf Course when his wife rolled up the path on a golf cart with the news of his Hall of Fame election. Immediately, his game went south. "The minute I heard the news, my knees got weak, my hands got weak," the former Orioles manager said.
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January 21, 2013 | BY DOUG DARROCH, Daily News Staff Writer darrocd@phillynews.com
THEY BOTH were sons of St. Louis in their own ways. Both have well-earned plaques in Cooperstown. And both died over the weekend. Otherwise, Stan Musial and Earl Weaver couldn't have been more different. "On my tombstone," Weaver once said, "just write, 'The sorest loser that ever lived.' " Weaver, the Baltimore Orioles manager known as much for his arguments with umpires as for his dugout prowess, was ejected from 98 games - including both ends of a doubleheader. Musial, who played in more than 3,000 games, was ejected from none.
SPORTS
September 19, 2006 | By Claire Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pittsburgh Pirates proved that good things can - and do - happen at a confluence when they brought home a World Series championship to Three Rivers Stadium in 1971. Yesterday, the Phillies and Delaware County sought to borrow from that trailblazing team's legacy. The Pirates' cross-state rivals joined with the Delaware County Athletes Sports Hall of Fame to bring three good causes together when they gathered at the Renaissance Airport Hotel to honor Danny Murtaugh, the Chester native who managed the '71 Bucs, and raise money to revive baseball in inner cities, in general, and Murtaugh's hometown, in particular.
SPORTS
March 24, 1999 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Baltimore Orioles third baseman Cal Ripken Jr. left the team's training camp in Florida yesterday to be with his gravely ill father in Maryland, the team said. Details of Cal Ripken Sr.'s illness were not included in a brief statement issued by the team. The Baltimore Sun reported in October that the former Orioles coach and manager was suffering from lung cancer and was undergoing chemotherapy. The team did not say when the younger Ripken planned to return. "The Ripken family asks that media respect its privacy at this time," the Orioles said.
SPORTS
August 5, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
All these years later, Earl Weaver still won't leave Jim Palmer alone. The successful Baltimore Orioles manager joined Palmer in the Hall of Fame yesterday, and couldn't resist taking a few playful shots at his former ace pitcher. Weaver, whose "acerbic wit" was noted on his plaque, made sure, however, to include Palmer on the list of the game's greatest pitchers. "I don't want to forget Jim Palmer or he'll write another bad book about me," he said. His raspy voice steady after a couple of shaky moments early in his 13-minute induction speech, Weaver also praised the umpires who ejected him so often, drawing a laugh from the pro-Orioles crowd of less than 10,000.
SPORTS
July 3, 1986 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer
On Sunday afternoon, ABC will televise the Boston Red Sox and the Seattle Mariners. Tom Seaver is scheduled to start his second game for the Red Sox. On Monday night, ABC again brings us the American League East-leading Red Sox, with once-beaten Roger Clemens, and the Oakland A's, featuring rookie slugger Jose Canseco and Dave "Roundhouse Right" Stewart, who slugged ex- Phillies manager Pat Corrales in a brawl the other day. A network pays...
SPORTS
September 25, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Eddie Sawyer, a science teacher with a master's degree from Cornell University, was better known here as the manager of the Whiz Kids team that made it to the World Series, although somewhat disastrously, in 1950. He retired from baseball but was lured back for a second term with the Phillies in 1958 and that return lasted until the first game of the 1960 season. Even by their standards, the Phils were going to stink out loud that year - they would finish 59-95 - and Sawyer took a hard look at what he had and quit immediately following the opener.
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September 25, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Eddie Sawyer, a science teacher with a master's degree from Cornell University, was better known here as the manager of the Whiz Kids team that made it to the World Series, although somewhat disastrously, in 1950. He retired from baseball but was lured back for a second term with the Phillies in 1958 and that return lasted until the first game of the 1960 season. Even by their standards, the Phils were going to stink out loud that year - they would finish 59-95 - and Sawyer took a hard look at what he had and quit immediately following the opener.
SPORTS
January 21, 2013 | Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Earl Weaver always was up for an argument, especially with an umpire. At the slightest provocation, the Earl of Baltimore would spin his hat back, point his finger squarely at an ump's chest and then fire away. The Hall of Fame manager would even tangle with his own players, if necessary. Although reviled by some, Weaver was beloved in Baltimore and remained an Oriole to the end. The notoriously feisty skipper died at age 82 on a Caribbean cruise associated with the Orioles, his marketing agent said.
SPORTS
January 21, 2013 | BY DOUG DARROCH, Daily News Staff Writer darrocd@phillynews.com
THEY BOTH were sons of St. Louis in their own ways. Both have well-earned plaques in Cooperstown. And both died over the weekend. Otherwise, Stan Musial and Earl Weaver couldn't have been more different. "On my tombstone," Weaver once said, "just write, 'The sorest loser that ever lived.' " Weaver, the Baltimore Orioles manager known as much for his arguments with umpires as for his dugout prowess, was ejected from 98 games - including both ends of a doubleheader. Musial, who played in more than 3,000 games, was ejected from none.
SPORTS
May 10, 2011
EARL WEAVER liked to argue, especially with umpires. But the former Baltimore Orioles manager, who is 80, doesn't want his family battling in a similar fashion after he's gone. So he's auctioning off a good portion of the baseball mementos he's acquired throughout the years. "I have four children. They have children, and their children have children," Weaver told the Associated Press. "I don't know how to divide whatever memorabilia there is among them. " The way Weaver sees it, it's easier to divvy up a pile of cash than a pile of rings, bats, balls and the like.
SPORTS
June 13, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALTIMORE - The Baltimore Orioles were hitting Wednesday night and the fans in the right-field bleachers started chanting: "De-rek Je-ter. De-rek Je-ter. De-rek Je-ter. " Just as they do at all New York Yankees home games, the crowd wanted the shortstop to turn around and acknowledge their rhythmic praise. It is a Yankee Stadium tradition that started during the team's return to greatness in the mid-1990s and has continued into a new Bronx ballpark and a new century. The only difference on this night was that the Bronx Bombers were playing in Baltimore's Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
SPORTS
September 19, 2006 | By Claire Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pittsburgh Pirates proved that good things can - and do - happen at a confluence when they brought home a World Series championship to Three Rivers Stadium in 1971. Yesterday, the Phillies and Delaware County sought to borrow from that trailblazing team's legacy. The Pirates' cross-state rivals joined with the Delaware County Athletes Sports Hall of Fame to bring three good causes together when they gathered at the Renaissance Airport Hotel to honor Danny Murtaugh, the Chester native who managed the '71 Bucs, and raise money to revive baseball in inner cities, in general, and Murtaugh's hometown, in particular.
SPORTS
March 24, 1999 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Baltimore Orioles third baseman Cal Ripken Jr. left the team's training camp in Florida yesterday to be with his gravely ill father in Maryland, the team said. Details of Cal Ripken Sr.'s illness were not included in a brief statement issued by the team. The Baltimore Sun reported in October that the former Orioles coach and manager was suffering from lung cancer and was undergoing chemotherapy. The team did not say when the younger Ripken planned to return. "The Ripken family asks that media respect its privacy at this time," the Orioles said.
SPORTS
August 12, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Former Baltimore Orioles manager Earl Weaver, who suffered a mild heart attack last week, was released yesterday from a Miami hospital. Weaver, who will be 68 Friday, will have additional tests in two weeks. Weaver was inducted into the baseball Hall of Fame in 1996. He served two terms as Baltimore's manager, compiling a 1,480-1,060 record in 17 seasons and winning six AL East titles and the 1970 World Series. Albert Belle of the Chicago White Sox has 100 RBIs this season after Monday's 5-3 win over Oakland.
SPORTS
August 5, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
All these years later, Earl Weaver still won't leave Jim Palmer alone. The successful Baltimore Orioles manager joined Palmer in the Hall of Fame yesterday, and couldn't resist taking a few playful shots at his former ace pitcher. Weaver, whose "acerbic wit" was noted on his plaque, made sure, however, to include Palmer on the list of the game's greatest pitchers. "I don't want to forget Jim Palmer or he'll write another bad book about me," he said. His raspy voice steady after a couple of shaky moments early in his 13-minute induction speech, Weaver also praised the umpires who ejected him so often, drawing a laugh from the pro-Orioles crowd of less than 10,000.
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