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Early Childhood Education

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NEWS
July 2, 2007 | By ALBA E. MARTINEZ
IT'S JULY, and much to the delight of schoolchildren everywhere, summer is here. In just a few days, members of the state Legislature will join them on summer break - but not before passing the state budget for the next fiscal year. At this late date, the question remains whether the final version will include full funding for the early-childhood-education proposals made by the governor. These include Pre-K Counts, a new initiative to provide pre-kindergarten to 11,000 3- and 4-year-olds across the state, and Keystone STARS and Child Care Works, two well-established and effective programs that are improving the quality and availability of early education and care.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
PRESIDENT Obama's bold call for universal pre-K for the nation's 4-year-olds during last week's State of the Union address has reignited interest and brought welcome attention to the topic. He has since traveled to Georgia to press his agenda. What would he find if he came to Pennsylvania? He'd find a state whose major strides in providing pre-K and high-quality child care under Gov. Ed Rendell has stalled, and actually lost ground since Gov. Corbett took office. He'd find a governor who's failed to put state money where his mouth is. Corbett campaigned on his support for early-childhood education and vowed that, if elected, he'd "work to find more funding.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An all-day event focusing on early-childhood education will be held at Bucks County Community College on Oct. 7. Sponsored by the Bucks County Association for the Education of Young Children, the event will feature June S. Delano, who works with Head Start and other early-childhood programs. Delano will talk about the importance of good teaching in helping children thrive. In addition, the conference will offer more than 25 workshops on early- childhood education. For more information, call Pat Miiller at 215-493-4679.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing before about 500 3- and 4-year-olds at Franklin Square, the head of Philadelphia's school district made his case for more money for prekindergarten education. "What we know is that if kids have access to high-quality pre-K, then they're already off to a beautiful start," Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. told the children and more than 200 advocates and providers who packed the square. "Quite frankly, it's the difference between reading at a third-grade level and not. That's a big indicator for us for future success of a child.
NEWS
June 16, 2003 | By Kathryn J. Engebretson, Maxwell King and Rebecca W. Rimel
Almost half of children entering kindergarten in the United States are unprepared for the journey they are about to begin. Forty-eight percent of these children have moderate to serious cognitive and social problems at kindergarten entry. This is a shocking and sobering statistic. The effects extend through the rest of these children's lives, in most cases affecting future educational success and, consequently, professional and career advancement. Even more distressing, it's preventable - yet little is being done to improve the odds for our children.
NEWS
March 17, 2006 | By J. William Mills III
This week, thousands of parents, teachers and child-care directors have been meeting to discuss an issue crucial to the future of our regional economy: early-childhood education. The conference, which continues through tomorrow and is sponsored by the Delaware Valley Association for the Education of Young Children, couldn't be more timely. This year, voters will be electing local, state and national officials and it will be important to learn where they stand on more funding for early-childhood education.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITER
Sitting in his office one afternoon last week, Mayor Kenney said all of the praise he had received for a successful first seven months on the job was making him a bit uneasy. "Being Irish, I don't like that," Kenney quipped. "Because then that means something bad is going to happen. " Two days later, the FBI was swarming the home and office of one of Kenney's closest political allies, electrical union leader John Dougherty, in an investigation a source said touches on the union's financial support of Kenney's mayoral campaign.
NEWS
August 31, 2009
WHEN columnist John Baer writes that cutting state early childhood education programs is debatable, he ignores 40 years of research showing these programs increase academic achievement and graduation rates, and reduce special education, juvenile justice and welfare costs. For every dollar invested in good early childhood education, the public saves $8 to $17. Despite all we know about the benefits, publicly funded early childhood education reaches only four in 10 eligible children in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
August 20, 2008 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Angelo Calafati munches a fistful of Cheerios. Directly across from him, his mother, Dana, coos and smiles. She holds up a stack of 10 large cards with pictures of exotic flowers, and like a gunner who has found her target, she rattles off complex names for several seconds. South African daisy. Feverfew. Greater stitchwort. Angelo grins. He shows off his two front teeth. He gazes intently at the purple prickly pear. He furrows his brow. At times, he looks away. Over the morning's breakfast at the carriage house in Oaks, Calafati, 32, will present more large flash cards, many handmade, that cover a variety of subjects: European flags, mammals, forest animals, composers, even historical farm tractors and military helicopters with model numbers.
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NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITER
Sitting in his office one afternoon last week, Mayor Kenney said all of the praise he had received for a successful first seven months on the job was making him a bit uneasy. "Being Irish, I don't like that," Kenney quipped. "Because then that means something bad is going to happen. " Two days later, the FBI was swarming the home and office of one of Kenney's closest political allies, electrical union leader John Dougherty, in an investigation a source said touches on the union's financial support of Kenney's mayoral campaign.
NEWS
July 18, 2016
Tom Wolf is governor of Pennsylvania During the 2016-17 budget season, we accomplished three important priorities that I believe are critical to moving Pennsylvania forward. Working with the legislature, I secured increased funding for our schools and resources to battle the commonwealth's opioid epidemic, and greatly reduced our deficit. Funding our schools has always been a top priority for me. In this budget, I was able to secure an additional $200 million in basic education funding, as well as a $30 million increase for early-childhood education; a $20 million increase for special education and a $10 million increase for early intervention; and a nearly $40 million increase for higher education.
NEWS
July 13, 2016
Gov. Wolf says he will allow a $31.5 billion spending bill to become law without his signature, but it can't rightly be called a state budget because the legislature hasn't decided how to pay for it. It could be described as half a budget, a spending plan to nowhere, or another mostly empty gesture from Harrisburg. But it isn't a budget, and it won't be until lawmakers agree on the taxes and other revenues that allow the state to function. Intentionally or not, the Democratic governor has stepped out of the Republican-controlled legislature's way and is allowing it to race toward a brick wall of its own construction.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The Republican-controlled House and Senate left the Capitol building Friday - possibly for the entire holiday weekend - without having resolved how they are going to pay for the $31.5 billion budget they have sent to Gov. Wolf. After hours of closed-door talks, leaders in the chambers sent their members home, a sign that they are still wrangling among themselves and with the Democratic governor over how much in new revenue is necessary - and what taxes are needed to raise it - to bolster the spending plan they approved with impressive majorities earlier in the week.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Janet Haas
The city's bold policy move to solidify a revenue source to invest in our young children and our neighborhoods creates exciting new opportunities for Philadelphia. This new funding will launch an effort to guarantee all children in the city access to a high-quality early education and strengthen their start in life. It will also jumpstart the Rebuild initiative to revitalize parks, libraries, and recreation centers so that Philadelphians have safe and engaging places to learn, play, and come together.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
A quarter of Philadelphia's residents live in poverty, and too many of its children grow up in dangerous neighborhoods and attend struggling schools. Even after decades of antipoverty efforts and education reforms, these problems persist with maddening certainty. Mayor Kenney's bold plan to provide prekindergarten education in the parts of the city that need it most would give more of the youngest Philadelphians a better chance to succeed. Studies since the 1960s have shown that early-childhood education helps more students graduate from high school, go on to get and keep good jobs, and contribute to their communities.
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITER
The commission formed to study universal pre-K in the city is weighing whether to include Mayor Kenney's sugary drink tax in its final recommendations report. The independent commission, which began work in June, published a first draft in February that offered no proposals for how to fund pre-K, but did outline a breakdown of the benefits and costs of adding 10,000 quality pre-K seats. On Tuesday, at the commission's monthly meeting, members of the administration who are on the commission said the report should include the three-cent-per-ounce tax. Meeting attendees said conversation grew heated with some members not wanting the tax included in the proposal.
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The William Penn Foundation will commit a one-time, $15 million grant to improve and expand quality pre-K facilities in Philadelphia. The announcement marks the first major philanthropic investment in pre-K since Mayor Kenney announced his goal to make such care accessible to all city 3- and 4-year-olds. "This means an organization like William Penn is confident that this is the right initiative and we're the right people to do it," Kenney said. The grant is projected to create space for 1,500 preschoolers in quality centers by 2021.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
First, Mayor Kenney handled the important business: reading a picture book called My Friends to a group of spellbound 4-year-olds. Next, he talked about what he calls one of the biggest priorities of his administration: opening prekindergarten seats to "as many children as we can reach. " Kenney and Pedro Rivera, Pennsylvania's top education official, traveled Tuesday to a Northeast early-childhood education center to tout the recent release of state funds that will pay for 1,500 new prekindergarten seats.
NEWS
July 21, 2015
PHILADELPHIA'S future is dependent on the future of its children. Most parents know that. And most parents - rich, poor and middle-class - want a better life for their children. They also know, in their gut, that the path to that better life is an education. There is a vast aspiring class of parents in this city who spend an enormous amount of time and effort seeking a good education for their kids. They join the admissions lottery at charter schools. They sometimes move to be in the catchment area of a good public school.
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