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Early Decision

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NEWS
December 12, 2002 | By Christopher Hooker-Haring
Early decision is taking a beating in the media these days. But do we really believe that students who are old enough to drive a car, vote for President, even carry guns and fight wars aren't old enough or thoughtful enough to determine a first-choice college in November or December of the senior year as opposed to April? This mindset infantilizes students at precisely the time they should be encouraged in the direction of independent decision-making. It also robs them of their voice in the admissions process.
NEWS
December 12, 2002 | By Katherine Reilly
My high school in mid-December early-decision season is like a war zone. Espionage is undertaken to find out who has gotten in where. Task forces are dispatched to comfort the deferred and rejected. The postman is followed as if under surveillance. Last December, I, a cool college kid returning from Princeton, decided to pay a visit to my old teachers and friends at Millburn High School. I'd forgotten about the intensity of the early-decision wars. On my visit, the losers were obvious, from the boy who sported a "Yale Sucks" T-shirt to the girl who told me that Princeton had ruined her life by not accepting her. These kids had come to realize the truth.
NEWS
December 26, 2001 | By HILARY BALLON
LAST WEEK thousands of high school seniors received acceptance letters from the colleges of their choice. But the early-decision process that they used has received much unfair criticism. Richard Levin, president of Yale, for example, has said he wants to end early-decision admissions, the process by which a student applies to one college and promises to attend that college if he or she is admitted in December, before the regular admissions cycle begins. Critics say that early-decision programs unnecessarily push the college admissions process into the junior year of high school.
NEWS
December 12, 2002 | By Nancy Kelley
Over the next week, thousands of high school seniors who entered the November early-decision sweepstakes will learn whether they hold a winning ticket to the college of their choice. For some students, this process is perfectly fine. But for too many bright young people - and their families - it is a hasty, ill-conceived gamble driven by feverish attachment to one and only one institution. The evident question is: "How do students know if an early-decision application is worthwhile for them?"
NEWS
November 7, 2002 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For high school juniors bracing to enter the nail-biting, high-stakes process of applying early to America's most selective colleges, the stress level has just been ratcheted down - a hair. Yale University yesterday said it would overhaul its early-decision admissions program so students applying next fall will not be bound to attend Yale if accepted. The move was praised by some high school guidance counselors, who said early decision had become a dangerous practice that benefited prestigious colleges, unnecessarily accelerated the college application process, and limited financial-aid options of cash-strapped students.
NEWS
September 15, 2006 | By Louis L. Hirsh
Congratulations to Harvard for dropping its early-admissions program this week. Last spring, the University of Delaware did the same thing. From now on, all freshman applicants will hear from us in March. Within hours of our announcement, congratulatory e-mail began flooding my in-box. Some were effusive ("thank you, thank you, thank you!"), and most were from high school guidance counselors. Why the fuss? Early-decision programs allow students to apply by Nov. 1 to their "first-choice college" and to hear a decision by Dec. 15. If it is a "binding" program, as ours was, then students agree that, if admitted, they will withdraw their other college applications and send in their enrollment deposits by Jan. 15. While early decision lets students hear sooner, it has drawbacks.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harvard and Princeton, two of the most competitive Ivy League colleges, will resume an early-action program as part of their admissions this fall, officials announced Thursday. Both schools eliminated early-action programs several years ago as a way to open access to more low-income and minority applicants and remove some of the pressure and complexity of the process. Early action generally is considered to favor students from higher-income families who can make a decision earlier, don't need to weigh aid packages from other schools, and are better prepared to navigate the admissions process.
NEWS
December 21, 2002
Early decision is for the privileged student I found the discussion on the college "early-decision" issue an interesting one, especially given the fundamental inequality of the American higher education admissions system ("The early-decison stampede," Dec. 12 Commentary Page). Applying to a college for early decision is one of a host of options that privileged students can utilize to boost the odds of their admission to a college. Add to this the option of high-priced SAT and SAT II tutoring.
NEWS
November 10, 2004 | By Mark Franek
What do Oprah Winfrey, Steven Spielberg, and Microsoft cofounder Paul Gardner all have in common (besides about $23 billion)? That's right - they all attended state-run universities. I dig this fact out of my dean of students file every year around this time when our high school seniors are putting the finishing touches on their college applications, particularly those one-shot deals at early-decision schools. In early-decision programs, students start their senior year ready to choose the one college they would most like to attend.
NEWS
May 25, 1994 | By Mark Narducci, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Tim Bloom was a 9-year-old Little League player in Haddonfield, his coach took one look at him and determined what his future position would be. "He said that I was lefthanded and that I was going to be a pitcher," said Bloom, now a senior at Haddonfield High. "And that's how I got my start. " That spur-of-the-moment decision has proved successful. The coach didn't realize it at the time, but he also would benefit years down the road. The Little League coach was Dick Eastwick, who is now Haddonfield's baseball coach.
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SPORTS
July 13, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The chance for Chip Kelly to evaluate his quarterbacks has been limited to two months of offseason work that did not include pads, contact, or a live pass rush for his passers to sidestep. Only two-thirds of the offense has been installed. That's why the Eagles coach has elected to exercise patience in the quarterback competition, withholding judgment until it's necessary - or obvious - to make a decision between Michael Vick and Nick Foles, and potentially even Matt Barkley.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harvard and Princeton, two of the most competitive Ivy League colleges, will resume an early-action program as part of their admissions this fall, officials announced Thursday. Both schools eliminated early-action programs several years ago as a way to open access to more low-income and minority applicants and remove some of the pressure and complexity of the process. Early action generally is considered to favor students from higher-income families who can make a decision earlier, don't need to weigh aid packages from other schools, and are better prepared to navigate the admissions process.
NEWS
September 26, 2010
Grant Calder is a college counselor and teaches history at Friends' Central School It's that time of year again. High school seniors are deciding where they will apply to college, and for a sizable fraction the pivotal question is, Should I apply early? Early application options vary by institution, but the one that generates the most debate at kitchen tables and in college counseling offices around the country is "early decision," popularly known as ED. The ED candidate chooses one college early in her senior year, and if that college admits her, she must enroll.
SPORTS
May 28, 2008 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maybe it was the wink. Maybe it was the other obvious reasons. But when Tom Savage orally committed to Rutgers on April 19, the Cardinal O'Hara High quarterback was falling in line with other top-ranked recruits who were deciding their football futures without having played a down as a senior. In the world of college recruiting, all the rage is committing early. And if you're a major Division I talent - such as Savage - there is seemingly almost no reason to wait - unless you believe the college and high school coaches who are sounding the alarm as the process quickens and threatens to overrun what they call common sense.
SPORTS
January 11, 2008 | By JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO For the Daily News
Now it begins. The letters and the knowing nods from college coaches were nice. But this is the real season for Cardinal O'Hara High standout quarterback Tom Savage. The 6-4, 225-pound junior made a real nice step last Saturday, at the U.S. Army All-American Combine, held in San Antonio, as part of the U.S. Army All-American Bowl weekend. Savage was among 70 junior quarterbacks invited throughout the country - and he distinguished himself more than any of them, selected as the combine's overall MVP. The combine featured the top 500 players in the country.
NEWS
April 26, 2007 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As soon as Bryn Mawr College decided it wanted Victoria Kopesky in its freshman class, the courtship began. E-mails from professors, phone-a-thons with Bryn Mawr students, a welcome video, a weekend open house with a slumber party, team-building games and tours of the town - the school bent over backward to woo the brainy Yardley teen. "It's incredibly validating," the robotics and computer-programming enthusiast - who was accepted at nine of the 13 colleges where she applied - said during a bean bag game at Bryn Mawr's recent Spring Festival.
NEWS
January 15, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Harvard University announced plans in September to eliminate its early-admission program because it appeared to slight students from lower-income families, many in the higher education community expected other schools to follow. Princeton University did. So did the University of Virginia. But the imitation stopped there. The University of Pennsylvania and its other Ivy League sisters refused to budge. So have other selective private schools, such as Swarthmore, Bryn Mawr and Dickinson.
NEWS
September 30, 2006
In recent weeks, Harvard and Princeton have joined the University of Delaware and others in eliminating their early-admissions programs. Readers weigh in on the change and how their families were affected by early admissions: Alice Robison Exton Two of my sons went the regular college-admissions route and one went early decision. In the latter case, there was going to be time to apply to other schools if he was rejected. All three were accepted to their first-choice schools.
NEWS
September 15, 2006 | By Louis L. Hirsh
Congratulations to Harvard for dropping its early-admissions program this week. Last spring, the University of Delaware did the same thing. From now on, all freshman applicants will hear from us in March. Within hours of our announcement, congratulatory e-mail began flooding my in-box. Some were effusive ("thank you, thank you, thank you!"), and most were from high school guidance counselors. Why the fuss? Early-decision programs allow students to apply by Nov. 1 to their "first-choice college" and to hear a decision by Dec. 15. If it is a "binding" program, as ours was, then students agree that, if admitted, they will withdraw their other college applications and send in their enrollment deposits by Jan. 15. While early decision lets students hear sooner, it has drawbacks.
SPORTS
July 12, 2006 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In the second half of one of the many games he played at the six-day Reebok ABCD Camp, Monsignor Bonner's Jeff Jones found himself matched up against O.J. Mayo. Some players might have been overcome with nerves, fearful that they would be burned by Mayo, widely regarded as the top basketball recruit in the country. But Jones stood his ground, not backing down from the dynamic 6-foot-5 guard from Cincinnati's North College Hill High. "That's why you want to come to a camp like this, to compete against a guy like O.J. Mayo," Jones said.
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