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NEWS
November 19, 1991 | Inquirer photographs by Michael Bryant
It's about rocks. It's about crystals. It's about the very core of the planet. It's the Academy of Natural Sciences' newest exhibit, "What on Earth. " The fact-filled displays also deal with fault lines and mountain regions and other geological phenomena. Some area students yesterday got a preview of the exhibit, which opens Saturday.
NEWS
August 13, 1987 | By Maria Archangelo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Medical Mission Sisters are sponsoring a public sunrise service Sunday to celebrate the "Harmonic Convergence," a global healing event that will encourage people to change their attitudes toward the Earth and to stop abuses of the Earth. The service, which will be at 6 a.m. on the Mission Sisters grounds at 8400 Pine Rd., will consist of singing and meditation, according to Sister Estelle Demers. Earthings, a Mission Sisters project concerned with the well-being of the Earth, is sponsoring the service.
NEWS
April 3, 2008
THERE'S a question I've been trying to find an answer to for quite some time. The total mass of our planet seems to be steadily decreasing. For millions of years, the earth's mass stayed relatively the same. Land masses shifted, glaciers formed and melted, but our total weight stayed the same. But with the Industrial Revolution came our dependence on fossil fuel. The oil and coal we have extracted from the earth does not replenish itself and has, to some extent, changed the mass of our planet.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1990 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
A thin, filmy blue arch sweeps across the screen. Above is the blackness of outer space. Below is the living Earth. The planet is huge, the abyss even greater, and all that separates one from the other is the frail blue line - our atmosphere. The atmosphere that we are polluting, tampering with, poking holes in. This scene, taken with special 70mm cameras from an orbiting space shuttle, in one spectacular image rams home how delicate is the world we treat so rudely. This is the sobering yet vivid vision of Blue Planet, opening today at the Franklin Institute's Omniverse Theater.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By DONELLA H. MEADOWS
Is Earth fragile and vulnerable or tough and ruthless? Is it possible for us to trash a whole planet? Or is it about to trash us? "Gaea, as I see her, is no doting mother tolerant of misdemeanors, nor is she some fragile and delicate damsel in danger from brutal mankind. She is stern and tough, always keeping the world warm and comfortable for those who obey the rules, but ruthless in her destruction of those who transgress," said James Lovelock, originator of the idea that Earth is one integrated organism.
NEWS
January 19, 1995
More than 3,000 dead. Entire blocks of Kobe, Japan burned beyond recognition. Hundreds of thousands of residents streaming out of a city collapsing under the demands of so heavy a relief operation. The earthquake that struck Japan's busy port center at 5:46 a.m. Tuesday caused scenes of unimaginable grief and destruction. And those half a world away, watching the force of nature at its most brutal, can't help but wonder whether there is anything human beings can do to minimize the damage.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Paul Halpern
Some of the most active advocates for peace have been scientists. Albert Einstein, Bertrand Russell, Linus Pauling, and Albert Schweitzer were among the scientific luminaries who worked tirelessly for global harmony. Perhaps their understanding of Earth's preciousness as the only known planet with life helped inspire their efforts. This season, when night is longest and darkest, offers ample opportunity to reflect on our place in the universe, and to share in the sense of humility that has motivated many thinkers to contemplate ways to bring unity to Earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2000 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Postal Service inches closer to its 2000 program of more than 100 stamps with 20 additional commemoratives honoring the Pacific Coast rain forest, sculptor Louise Nevelson and astronomer Edwin Powell Hubble. A self-adhesive sheet of 10 stamps, each 33 cents, was issued March 29 depicting more than two dozen animal and plant species common to the temperate rain forest that stretches from northern California to the Gulf of Alaska. First-day ceremonies will be held at the Elk Overlook in Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, Wash.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine 200 gigantic marine farms that drift on the surfaces of the world's oceans. Or satellites bigger than Boston or San Francisco that beam solar energy back to Earth. Or so many tons of chemicals dumped into the atmosphere to cleanse it that the sky is bleached white. These are just a few of the visionary schemes being dreamed up by some of the nation's most brilliant scientists as possible ways to combat the global warming that is expected to occur as a result of the greenhouse effect.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | By Vyola P. Willson, Special to The Inquirer
Three-quarters of a million people are expected to visit the Franklin Institute in the next few months to see the Earth from space as only 300 astronauts have viewed it - courtesy of a Chester County company. The showing of Blue Planet, a film shot by the crews of the shuttles Atlantis, Columbia and Discovery, has been financed by a contribution of $150,000 from Environmental Resources Management Inc. of Exton, an environmental consulting company. The film was shot on five NASA shuttle missions between December 1985 and April of this year by 40 astronauts trained in the use of a special camera.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 1, 2016
Half-Earth Our Planet's Fight for Life By E.O. Wilson Liveright. 272 pp. $25.95 Reviewed by Mike Weilbacher Entomologist Edward O. Wilson, the modern era's Rachel Carson, has an audacious idea that might jump-start a lagging conversation about a burning issue. "I propose," he writes in Half-Earth: Our Planet's Fight for Life , "that only by committing half of the planet's surface to nature can we hope to save the immensity of life-forms that compose it. " That's right: Half-Earth asks us to set aside half the world for the rest of creation.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Rosanne Mistretta has taught environmental science for 16 years on Abington Friends School's 50-acre campus, using its branch of Jenkintown Creek and its 300 towering trees as a kid-magnet green classroom. So, she was overwhelmed with joy when Julie Slavet, executive director of the Tookany Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership, told Abington Friends staffers in 2014 that $105,547 was available to plant a riparian buffer of 350 saplings along the creek and create a rain garden at its headwaters behind the lower school.
NEWS
April 22, 2016
ISSUE | EARTH DAY Rebuild prudently As a doctor, a professor of medicine, and an activist for 40 years, I've cared for the health of people and our planet. With the 47th annual observance of Earth Day on Friday, the state of disrepair of our country's infrastructure presents us with a golden opportunity to rebuild not based on fossil fuels, but on efficiency and renewable energy. While rebuilding, we can fortify our communities against the severe storms that climate change will continue to bring.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
In the comic book world of author Pearl S. Buck, the superhero is on a crusade without a cape, mask, or phone booth for a quick change. Johnny Everyman, a civil engineer by day and night, fights for ethnic and racial justice using only his powers of persuasion. Billed as the "friend of the people of many lands," Everyman was the Nobel Prize-winning writer's effort to spread a message of acceptance and cross-cultural understanding in the 1940s, when the world was at war and prejudice and xenophobia were widespread.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Steven Rea, MOVIE CRITIC
Ciro Guerra's profoundly beautiful Embrace of the Serpent , one of the nominees for best foreign language film at this year's Academy Awards, touches on many of the same themes that Terrence Malick (see the review of his Knight of Cups , Page 4) explored in his 2005 feature The New World . Malick's film was about the arrival of the British on the shores of 1600s Virginia, with John Smith's meeting the beautiful Pocahontas of the Powhatans and white men from Europe invading and corrupting the virgin Americas.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Maurice White, 74, the founder and leader of Earth, Wind & Fire, died at home in Los Angeles on Wednesday, said his brother, Verdine White. A former session drummer, Mr. White founded Earth, Wind & Fire in the late 1960s. The group went on to sell more than 90 million albums worldwide, displaying a flashy and eclectic musical style that incorporated his influences from growing up in Memphis, Tenn., and working at the influential Chicago music labels Chess and Okeh. The band's many hits included "September," "Shining Star," a cover of the Beatles' "Got to Get You into My Life" and "Boogie Wonderland.
NEWS
January 9, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
On the afternoon of Jan. 3, 2011, Kacey Lynn Prim told her mother she was going out and left their home in Audubon, Camden County. Prim was 23, and it was normal for her to take walks. So her mother, Tina, didn't question where she was headed. The next day, Kacey still hadn't returned. Around 2:20 p.m., she called her mother and apologized for being out so long. "I'll be home in a little while," Kacey Prim said, according to her mother. Then the call disconnected. Tina Prim, now 63, never heard from her daughter again.
SPORTS
December 30, 2015 | By Ladd Biro, For The Inquirer
Week 16 was most notable for its upsets, from the screeching halt of Carolina's drive for perfection to the Patriots' bungled handling of the overtime coin toss. Somehow, the Ravens mustered their divisional-rival powers to ground Pittsburgh's passing attack while the Rams knocked the surging Seahawks offense off-stride for the first time since Week 10. And while the Cardinals' ninth consecutive victory wasn't a surprise, the way they humiliated the Packers' offense sure was. Each of these unexpected outcomes yielded disappointing fantasy results for many of the players who had propelled their owners to the championship round.
NEWS
December 4, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961 On Twitter: @DanGeringer
EMILY EGGLY, a senior at Moore College of Art & Design in Center City, said she is constantly surprised by the teenagers with exceptional intellectual, physical, social and emotional needs who she teaches in her "Special Populations" art class. Eggly, who plans to be an art therapist, said, "The first things that develop in our brains are images. We can look at a picture of a dog and know it's a dog before we learn the word 'dog.' So even if you're non-verbal, you can communicate through your images.
NEWS
October 1, 2015
WILL POPE FRANCIS' urging that we all commit to helping the poor make a difference? I hope the pope's advocacy of the poor not only changes minds but also inspires people to become involved in helping the less fortunate. "Each son or daughter of a given country has a mission, a personal and social responsibility," the pope said during his address to a joint session of Congress. And don't just give your money. Give your time and talents. My husband, who stretches out his workday so that he can have a day off every other week, has decided to spend many of those days accompanying me to a prison in Maryland where we teach financial literacy to inmates.
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