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NEWS
November 19, 1991 | Inquirer photographs by Michael Bryant
It's about rocks. It's about crystals. It's about the very core of the planet. It's the Academy of Natural Sciences' newest exhibit, "What on Earth. " The fact-filled displays also deal with fault lines and mountain regions and other geological phenomena. Some area students yesterday got a preview of the exhibit, which opens Saturday.
NEWS
August 13, 1987 | By Maria Archangelo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Medical Mission Sisters are sponsoring a public sunrise service Sunday to celebrate the "Harmonic Convergence," a global healing event that will encourage people to change their attitudes toward the Earth and to stop abuses of the Earth. The service, which will be at 6 a.m. on the Mission Sisters grounds at 8400 Pine Rd., will consist of singing and meditation, according to Sister Estelle Demers. Earthings, a Mission Sisters project concerned with the well-being of the Earth, is sponsoring the service.
NEWS
April 3, 2008
THERE'S a question I've been trying to find an answer to for quite some time. The total mass of our planet seems to be steadily decreasing. For millions of years, the earth's mass stayed relatively the same. Land masses shifted, glaciers formed and melted, but our total weight stayed the same. But with the Industrial Revolution came our dependence on fossil fuel. The oil and coal we have extracted from the earth does not replenish itself and has, to some extent, changed the mass of our planet.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1990 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
A thin, filmy blue arch sweeps across the screen. Above is the blackness of outer space. Below is the living Earth. The planet is huge, the abyss even greater, and all that separates one from the other is the frail blue line - our atmosphere. The atmosphere that we are polluting, tampering with, poking holes in. This scene, taken with special 70mm cameras from an orbiting space shuttle, in one spectacular image rams home how delicate is the world we treat so rudely. This is the sobering yet vivid vision of Blue Planet, opening today at the Franklin Institute's Omniverse Theater.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By DONELLA H. MEADOWS
Is Earth fragile and vulnerable or tough and ruthless? Is it possible for us to trash a whole planet? Or is it about to trash us? "Gaea, as I see her, is no doting mother tolerant of misdemeanors, nor is she some fragile and delicate damsel in danger from brutal mankind. She is stern and tough, always keeping the world warm and comfortable for those who obey the rules, but ruthless in her destruction of those who transgress," said James Lovelock, originator of the idea that Earth is one integrated organism.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | Los Angeles Times
Don't get Dolly Parton started about end-of-the-world prognosticators. On her new album, "Better Day," Parton sounds, in the first song, "In the Meantime," like she's been writing straight off the headlines generated by the prediction that Judgment Day would come on May 21. Yet: "I started writing it years ago," Parton said. "I wrote it when some other crazy looney-tune was saying the world was coming to an end. God knows when the end of time will come, not some fanatic. . . . Anyway, we're more apt to blow the world up than something else happening.
NEWS
January 19, 1995
More than 3,000 dead. Entire blocks of Kobe, Japan burned beyond recognition. Hundreds of thousands of residents streaming out of a city collapsing under the demands of so heavy a relief operation. The earthquake that struck Japan's busy port center at 5:46 a.m. Tuesday caused scenes of unimaginable grief and destruction. And those half a world away, watching the force of nature at its most brutal, can't help but wonder whether there is anything human beings can do to minimize the damage.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Paul Halpern
Some of the most active advocates for peace have been scientists. Albert Einstein, Bertrand Russell, Linus Pauling, and Albert Schweitzer were among the scientific luminaries who worked tirelessly for global harmony. Perhaps their understanding of Earth's preciousness as the only known planet with life helped inspire their efforts. This season, when night is longest and darkest, offers ample opportunity to reflect on our place in the universe, and to share in the sense of humility that has motivated many thinkers to contemplate ways to bring unity to Earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2000 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Postal Service inches closer to its 2000 program of more than 100 stamps with 20 additional commemoratives honoring the Pacific Coast rain forest, sculptor Louise Nevelson and astronomer Edwin Powell Hubble. A self-adhesive sheet of 10 stamps, each 33 cents, was issued March 29 depicting more than two dozen animal and plant species common to the temperate rain forest that stretches from northern California to the Gulf of Alaska. First-day ceremonies will be held at the Elk Overlook in Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, Wash.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine 200 gigantic marine farms that drift on the surfaces of the world's oceans. Or satellites bigger than Boston or San Francisco that beam solar energy back to Earth. Or so many tons of chemicals dumped into the atmosphere to cleanse it that the sky is bleached white. These are just a few of the visionary schemes being dreamed up by some of the nation's most brilliant scientists as possible ways to combat the global warming that is expected to occur as a result of the greenhouse effect.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 8, 2015
"ORPHAN" is a very empty word, starting with the initial "O" that reminds me of a big, alphabetic hole. It conjures up images of loss, of being rootless, of unwanted and untenable liberty. When I think of "orphan," I think of something flying around in the great human universe, searching for its home. Today, I'm an orphan. That sounds silly, given the fact that I've been able to vote for more than 35 years, which means I'm a very big girl. I pay taxes, own (33 1/3 percent of) a house, take the El by myself and even know how to defrost things.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Naturepalooza! Family Earth Day Festival at Schuylkill Center The Schuylkill Center offers up some Earth Day fun, with live music and animal shows, sustainable technology demos, crafts, and more. Guests can go on walks and also be a citizen scientist for the day. The event is part of the Philadelphia Science Festival's Discovery Day. Naturepalooza! Family Earth Day Festival, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, 8480 Hagys Mill Rd. Center hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2015 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
CANDY WRAPPERS, pregnancy tests, Halloween decorations and more beer cans than you can imagine - Bradley Maule has collected it all over the course of a year during his weekly hikes through Wissahickon Valley Park. And now, he's ready to display his findings. All 3,768 of them. Maule's "One Man's Trash" project launched in January 2014 in hopes of bringing attention to litter in Wissahickon Valley Park. The PhillySkyline.com founder and Hidden City co-editor started the project because he was appalled by the amount of trash he saw in the Northwest Philly arm of Fairmount Park along Wissahickon Creek.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bradley Maule will not be exhibiting the banana peels and dog poop bags, the tissues and condoms, the huge wooden pallet, the old tires, the sofa bed, the pile of broken Adirondack chairs, or the "two gigantic plastic PVC pipes. " Organics and big, big stuff are out, he said. But never fear, there's plenty of weirdness. When Maule unveils his Wissahickon Valley Park booty - collected over the course of a year's worth of weekly woodland rambles - for exhibition Wednesday, Earth Day, devotees of the strange will not be disappointed.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY VANCE LEHMKUHL
  ON EARTH DAY, there are those who get into celebrating the planet and tweaking our lifestyle for the common good, and there are those who don't. Those who don't sometimes make good points about home recycling bins as mere spit in the ocean of vast industrial pollution, and other times indulge in stubborn ear-plugging accompanied by magical and/or wishful thinking. To all of us who recognize a scientifically credible threat, the head-in-sand position can be frustrating, and we might roll our eyes at its ridiculousness.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The astronaut Scott Kelly is about to take off for the International Space Station, and if he is like some space travelers, he may temporarily feel a bit foggy or disoriented once in orbit. Scientists have not had much luck measuring this subtle effect with standard cognitive tests, but now, a group of University of Pennsylvania researchers is trying a new tack. While Kelly is in space, they will compare his mental performance with that of a uniquely qualified individual who stays behind on Earth.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Will Forte had me at the Cheez Whiz. Six minutes into his terrific Fox sitcom, The Last Man on Earth - in which he plays, um, the last man left alive on Earth - Forte samples a $10,000 bottle of red wine with his bowl of SpaghettiOs. Then he has a brainstorm (or a meltdown) and squirts a dollop of processed canned cheese into the glass and takes a nice long sip. He deliberates for a while, then declares, "Not as good. " The Last Man on Earth premieres at 9 p.m. Sunday with a double episode.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
BY DAY, rhythm guitarist Mike Ellis and drummer Nikki Shannon, friends for 24 of their 48 years, rehab homes they've bought in Ellis' native West Philadelphia, then sell them and rehab some more. By night, they morph into Crown of Earth, playing wall-shaking anthems with bandmates Chris Graziola (lead guitar), Danny Knight (vocals) and Marky Z (bass), including "Born Again Warrior," their tribute to veterans that comes straight from their heavy-metal hearts. Ellis said that as a kid, he spent two weeks every summer with a great-uncle who'd survived the 1942 Bataan Death March and three years in a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp before being liberated on V-J Day in 1945.
NEWS
October 2, 2014 | By John Stuetz, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - The ever-optimistic coach James Franklin offered something new last weekend, and it wasn't a positive adjective. In fact, it was a different tone entirely. "I promise you and guarantee you it will be fixed," Franklin said of Penn State's performance after an unexpected 23-point loss to Northwestern on Saturday. Franklin's previously unbeaten Nittany Lions appeared primed to enter their first bye week with a full head of steam. News of the sanctions being rescinded led to an increased buzz around a program that had its bowl ban lifted less than three weeks ago. The removed sanctions offered the potential for a return to an 85-scholarship roster as soon as next season.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
I HATE "urban music," whether it's rap, hip-hop, gangsta or whatever else they're calling it these days. The brutal assault on my ears and my dignity (Beyonce, honey: Jay Z and your gynecologist should be the only ones gazing at . . . that) makes me wonder what Langston Hughes, James Baldwin and Zora Neale Hurston would think of the trashy mess. When I wrote something similar a few years ago, I got called a lot of things that would fit right in with an urban melody. I also, predictably, was labeled a racist because, as everyone knows, you cannot malign rap, etc., without also wanting to repeal the 13th Amendment.
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