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Earth

NEWS
December 16, 1990 | By Vyola P. Willson, Special to The Inquirer
Three-quarters of a million people are expected to visit the Franklin Institute in the next few months to see the Earth from space as only 300 astronauts have viewed it - courtesy of a Chester County company. The showing of Blue Planet, a film shot by the crews of the shuttles Atlantis, Columbia and Discovery, has been financed by a contribution of $150,000 from Environmental Resources Management Inc. of Exton, an environmental consulting company. The film was shot on five NASA shuttle missions between December 1985 and April of this year by 40 astronauts trained in the use of a special camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The show begins with God standing on a platform rising in billows of smoke to a height of 15 feet above the stage. From this lofty perch, the Almighty proceeds to create Heaven and Earth. That's a tough act to follow, and it is a credit to director Joe Leonardo that the Temple University production of The Medieval Mystery Plays maintains its initial high level of imagination, ingenuity and virtuosity. Leonardo, with the aid of some technical wizards on the Temple staff and an enthusiastic, spirited cast of university actors, has fashioned a wonderful, inspired entertainment.
SPORTS
September 8, 1993 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
For one moment in time, the Phillies allowed themselves to dream. They watched with their eyes as Ben Rivera pitched his best game of the season, a four-hit shutout against the Chicago Cubs. But they saw with their hearts, too. And what they saw was a Rivera who, at just the right time, seemed to have rediscovered the mystery that made him a dominant pitcher in the second half of last season, a mastery that has proved maddeningly elusive for most of this season. But what if?
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Feeling as if the day is dragging? Blame global warming. Increased man-made carbon dioxide, a global-warming gas in the atmosphere, is slowing Earth's rotation, according to a study by Belgian scientists published last week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. It's not much of a slowdown - about 1.7 microseconds, or 1.7 millionths of one second, a year, according to coauthor Michel Crucifix, a climate researcher at Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. The slowdown occurs because extra carbon dioxide expands the mass of Earth's atmosphere from Earth's surface.
NEWS
February 25, 2010
I'M UPSET with our leaders for allowing the space agency to continuously send up rockets or spaceships messing up the atmosphere (and don't forget shooting the moon), causing the atmosphere to go completely haywire. We the people of this planet are dealing with snow, and then it will be rain and flooding. When will you call a halt to this madness? You won't be able to live on the moon. You can't take care of what's happening on Earth. I'd like to see you stop for at least five years and get the Earth back on its feet.
NEWS
December 24, 2006 | By Donna Schaper
Warning: Incoming Christian stuff. Though not just for Christians. This holiday season, we've heard it all again: "How commercial Christmas has become!" These laments just don't get Christmas. Christmas is about commerce. It is about the ordinary carrying the holy. It is about God from heaven to earth come down. When we worry that Christmas is too commercial, we slide into bad theology. Bad theology misunderstands Christmas and misunderstands incarnation. Getting the Christ back in Christmas is not something we do in church but something we can also do at the mall.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
These days, we call it real estate. Or acreage. In another time and place - the pre-industrial China of the Manchu Dynasty - it was salvation. Pearl S. Buck called it, simply, The Good Earth. Buck won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for her novel. In 1938, Buck won the Nobel Prize for Literature. This prize was for the body of her work. Reportedly, the king of Sweden, who bestowed but did not select the Nobel award, confided to Buck that his favorite novel of hers was not The Good Earth but The Mother.
NEWS
November 10, 2003 | By Robert S. Boyd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The farther back you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see. - Winston Churchill Scientists have launched a project to construct a highly accurate calendar of key events in what they call "deep time," the almost unimaginable span since Earth was born 4.5 billion years ago. Sponsors believe a precise prehistoric time scale can help them better interpret what is happening to our planet today and predict what may lie ahead....
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Ed Finkel, Special to The Inquirer
The Earth is dying, and Americans will contribute to a global ecological disaster unless they radically alter their lifestyles, an environmental activist recently told a physicians' group. People in industrialized nations have plundered natural resources such as air, land and water, and such abuse must not continue, Helen Caldicott said in a speech to the Philadelphia chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility. "Our standard of living has to fall," Caldicott said Tuesday night in Penn Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's been so long since Earth, Wind & Fire was riding this high that vocalist and charter member Philip Bailey needs a reminder. "I really have to pinch myself," he says. The band that gave us lustrous hits like "After the Love Has Gone," "That's the Way of the World," and "Love's Holiday" comes into the Borgata Event Center for shows Friday and Saturday nights. Their new album, Now, Then & Forever , debuted at No. 11 on the Billboard Top 200 and at No. 5 on the R&B chart.
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