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NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
NASA has dubbed the Mars landing planned for early Monday morning the "seven minutes of terror" because that's how long the craft has to slow from 13,000 miles an hour to zero. The entry starts with a parachute, then rockets, and, finally, a novel "sky crane" with a cable that will lower a rover the size of a car gently onto the planet's surface. Though previous craft have landed on relatively gentle terrain, this is the first aimed at a precise spot close to more hazardous topography.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - SpaceX's Dragon space capsule, which last week became the world's first privately built and operated spacecraft to dock with the International Space Station, is scheduled to return to Earth on Thursday morning. The unmanned capsule is set to splash down at 11:44 a.m. Philadelphia time in the Pacific Ocean hundreds of miles west of Southern California. It will be the culmination of a historic mission carried out by the Hawthorne, Calif.-based company, officially known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Don't look to the heavens for signs of apocalyptic prophecies coming true. But over the next month, the skies will offer several interesting sights, including a solar eclipse and a rare view of Venus crossing the sun. Only one sight, though, will be easy to view here. ( Weather-permitting , of course.) That's Saturday night's so-called "super moon," which will rise shortly before 8 p.m. While it's near the horizon will be the ideal time for viewing, says Franklin Institute astronomer Derrick Pitts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | Vance Lehmkuhl
FUNNY THING about the lists of "helpful planet-saving tips" that show up as Earth Day (Sunday) approaches: They rarely include, much less spotlight, the daily action that could have the most impact: cutting down your meat and dairy consumption. The United Nations has repeatedly stated that we must drastically change our eating patterns, given that somewhere from 18 percent (if you credit the U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization 2006 estimate) to 51 percent (Worldwatch Institute's estimate, 2009)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Celebrate Earth Day on Sunday at the National Constitution Center and learn how you can go green. From noon to 5 p.m., guests can learn how to become active citizens working for a better environment. You can take the "It Is Easy Being Green" quiz and see how much you know about living an eco-friendly life, and learn about environmental trailblazers such as Lady Bird Johnson. At 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., guests can do the math by calculating the founding fathers' carbon footprint to see how environmentally friendly Philadelphia was during Revolutionary times.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | Inga Saffron
Would you live in a house made of dirt? The answer, I'm guessing, is no. As a building material, dirt has an image problem. Mud dwellings are practically synonymous with third-world poverty. At best, an earth structure is something you expect to encounter in an old hippie compound. Yet some of the world's most magnificent structures are made of little more than dirt and water, from New Mexico's pueblos to the great Djinguereber mosque in Timbuktu. Now, thanks to the effort of several committed architects, dirt is making a comeback, this time as the material of choice for modern buildings, including multistory ones.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | Associated Press
SYDNEY - Sydney's iconic Harbor Bridge and Opera House went dark on Saturday as Australians switched off lights around the country for an hour as part of a global effort to shine a spotlight on climate change. Hundreds of landmarks around the world including Washington's National Cathedral, London's Clock Tower, the Great Wall of China, and Berlin's Brandenburg Gate were being dimmed at 8:30 p.m. local time. The central Sydney icons have been taking part in the annual event since Earth Hour began as a Sydney-only event in 2007.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Elizabeth A. Kennedy, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - As world leaders close ranks against Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad, President Obama summed up the popular wisdom during a recent White House news conference: "Ultimately, this dictator will fall. " That prediction may be premature. Regime forces have retaken the major opposition strongholds, the rebels are low on money and guns, and the United Nations has ruled out any military intervention of the type that tipped the scales against Libya's Moammar Gadhafi.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
AUSTIN, Texas - What's the future of the music business? During the last week at the South by Southwest Music & Media Conference, that question was pondered over bites of barbecue and swigs of Shiner Bock. The answer, the industry types figured, had something to do with the cloud, and online streaming music services like Spotify, and making the right deals to build your band into a brand. And with that question settled (or not), everybody took to the streets to hear some music.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
You didn't need to be a solar physicist to be riveted by the "solar storm" that sent a blast of charged particles our way this month. That particular flare-up fizzled, but in the long term, the sun's temper is worthy of our attention. Our sun changes, and living things adapt or die. Our planet circled a very different star when life first emerged on Earth some four billion years ago. The sun was dimmer and cooler, but more violent, sending deadly blasts of X-rays as well as particles that would have lit up the skies with spectacular auroras.
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