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NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Now's your chance to see the comet that passed within 100 million miles of Earth last week. Twilight on Tuesday will provide the best photo op for Pan-STARRS. It will be visible in the Northern Hemisphere just above the western horizon - right next to a crescent moon. California astronomer Tony Phillips said the glare of the setting sun may make it difficult to see the comet with the naked eye. But he encourages casual sky gazers to give it a shot. The moon will provide an easy point of reference.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - In a Mars first, the Curiosity rover drilled into a rock and prepared to dump an aspirin-size pinch of powder into its onboard laboratories for closer inspection. The feat marked yet another milestone for the car-size rover, which landed last summer to much fanfare on an ambitious hunt to determine whether environmental conditions were favorable for microbes. Using the drill at the end of its 7-foot-long robotic arm, Curiosity on Friday chipped away at a flat, veined rock bearing numerous signs of past water flow.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Jim Snyder, Bloomberg News
An asteroid half the size of a U.S. football field will dart between Earth and orbiting satellites next week, sparing the human race and putting on a show for sky gazers in Eastern Europe, Asia, and Australia, NASA said. The 150-foot-diameter asteroid, named 2012 DA14, will pass about 17,000 miles above Earth on Friday - lower than the orbits of some satellites - in the closest-known approach of an object of its size. It will travel at 7.8 kilometers a second (17,400 miles an hour), or about eight times the speed of a rifle shot, NASA scientists said.
SPORTS
February 1, 2013 | BY MARK KRAM, Daily News Staff Writer kramm@phillynews.com
LA SALLE HEAD coach John Giannini tried to warn everyone. As brilliantly as the Explorers have played lately - including victories last week over ninth-ranked Butler and 19th-ranked Virginia Commonwealth - Giannini discouraged fans he encountered from becoming overly confident, especially given what appeared to him to be a certain battle Wednesday evening against Atlantic 10 rival Massachusetts. "Some wonderful, well-meaning people were so happy with what we have done, but I told them we were in for a challenge against UMass," said Giannini.
SPORTS
January 29, 2013 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S HAPPENED before and it will happen again, and if Mike Knuble had his druthers it will happen more often in the years to come. But it's still one of the more entertaining facets of hockey, watching two players side to side on a bench, one born somewhere around the time of the other's first foray into the professional game. So the other night, as the camera zeroed in on a conversation between Scott Laughton and Mike Knuble on the bench in Florida, it was natural to wonder: What on earth could they be talking about?
TRAVEL
January 20, 2013 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
We were at the other end of the world, literally. The opposite spot on the planet from Philadelphia (known by map geeks as the antipodal point) is Perth, Australia. We were 12,000 miles from home, as far away as we could possibly be. Going a mile in any direction would actually bring us closer to Philly. As we relaxed on the beach watching the sun melt into the Indian Ocean, we pondered that great distance. It was easy to leave the comforts of home, because we no longer had a home.
TRAVEL
January 13, 2013
Yoga teacher and medium Alaine Portner of Medford facilitated a human pod of 20 dolphin lovers in late September on her second annual retreat in Bimini for a week of snorkeling, yoga, breathwork, bodywork, and spiritual mediumship sessions. Each activity supports a feeling of harmony, enhancing a sense of wonderment at the mysteries of life, and even afterlife. The group gathered in Florida, and took a chartered flight 50 miles from Fort Lauderdale to Bimini. The Bahamian destination is actually three small islands, all surrounded by warm, clear turquoise waters that attract sea seekers from around the globe.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Paul Halpern
Some of the most active advocates for peace have been scientists. Albert Einstein, Bertrand Russell, Linus Pauling, and Albert Schweitzer were among the scientific luminaries who worked tirelessly for global harmony. Perhaps their understanding of Earth's preciousness as the only known planet with life helped inspire their efforts. This season, when night is longest and darkest, offers ample opportunity to reflect on our place in the universe, and to share in the sense of humility that has motivated many thinkers to contemplate ways to bring unity to Earth.
NEWS
November 18, 2012
Cleve Duncan, 78, whose soaring tenor voice as lead singer for the Penguins helped propel the 1954 doo-wop ballad "Earth Angel (Will You Be Mine)" to rock 'n' roll immortality, died Nov. 7 in Los Angeles. "Earth Angel," which has sold more than 10 million copies, was the Penguins' only hit. But its rhythmic, wailing plea to an idealized young woman captured the spirit of the just-emerging rock generation. Rolling Stone magazine placed it on its list of the 500 greatest songs ever, and films like Back to the Future have used it to conjure an era. Cleveland Duncan was born July 23 of either 1934 or 1935 in Los Angeles, and learned to sing in his church choir and glee clubs.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
Fallacies of climate-change skeptics Thank you for helping to give climate change the visibility it deserves ("Climate change an issue again," Monday). However, mentioned in your editorial without comment is one of the many fallacies used by climate-change skeptics. According to Mitt Romney, "there have been many times in the Earth's history when temperatures have been warmer than they are now. " That is true, but completely irrelevant to our current crisis. It is equally true, but irrelevant, that 650 million years ago glaciers covered the Earth from the poles to the tropics.
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