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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia spent the last decade working out a single, knotty planning problem: How should the old industrial spaces on the Delaware waterfront evolve? The consensus was that vacant land would be developed to resemble the rest of the city, with walkable streets, a mix of uses, and lively ground floors. No one was naive enough to think such projects could be realized without parking garages, but the expectation was that the structures would not dominate the river. It's a shame the conversation was never extended to the city's other riverfront, the Schuylkill, which has come alive since a trail park pushed into Center City.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | By Terence Samuel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the end of summer days in Philadelphia, when the sun turns red and begins to die in the corners of the sky, the lingering light turns the Schuylkill into a slow parade of jewels heading south to meet the Delaware. But for many people who live and work in Center City, it is a lost delight because there are few ways to enjoy, or even get to, the Schuylkill from downtown. That frustrates John Randolph, a Center City resident and developer, who sees the squandered sunsets and underutilized riverfront as resources that should be harnessed and even marketed.
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / PABLO ALCALA
The nimble feet of students at the Campbell Academy of Dance put on a show of step dancing at the Revel on the River. Dinner, jazz and fireworks rounded out Saturday's gala at the Fairmount Water Works. It was held to raise money for construction of the Schuylkill River Park along the east bank.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mayor Harry Kennedy has decided to devote the rest of this year to preserving open space in Franklin Township. And his top priority, Kennedy said in an interview last week, is making Malaga Lake a full-fledged recreation site. Kennedy said he intended to recommend to the Recreation Committee and Planning Board that $30,000 in the township's open space/recreation reserve fund be used on improvements at Malaga Lake, a popular recreation spot despite the absence of such basics as grills and picnic tables.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Diane Mastrull, Special to The Inquirer
A plan to turn 7.8 acres of open land into a recreational area at Malaga Lake in Franklin Township finally appears headed for action. Mayor Harry Kennedy said the township planned to use $30,000 of this year's Community Development Block Grant money to develop a swimming area and picnic grove along the east bank of the lake, at Route 40 and Old Delsea Drive. In addition, the township might acquire ownership of 26 acres next to the site through the Frank H. Stewart trust fund, named after a county outdoorsman and historian, Kennedy said.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THE $18 MILLION Schuylkill Banks Boardwalk opens today, so Philadelphians and their leashed dogs can "walk on water" from Locust Street to the South Street Bridge. Bike on water, too. Built out into the river parallel to the east bank, the 2,000-foot boardwalk experience is a heady mix of ducks and trucks, trees and breeze, cityscape and landscape, roadway and waterway, industrial and pastoral, trains and turtles, big sky and big city. Strolling along the city's newest people magnet yesterday, Joseph Syrnick, president/CEO of the Schuylkill River Development Corporation, who has spent eight years guiding the project from drawing board to boardwalk, talked about the romance of the river.
NEWS
April 25, 1994
By last week's end, peace seemed to be breaking out upriver as Dad Vail Regatta enthusiasts and city officials pulled together to save - and expand - a Philadelphia tradition. Meanwhile, downriver, a group of citizens, government officials, philanthropists and business leaders has been pulling together quietly for some time. Their mission: to transform the east bank of the Schuylkill from Locust Street to the Art Museum into a ribbon of trees, shrubs and pathways. We won't belabor the contrasts between this effort and the ugly dispute that erupted earlier over the scarcity of blacks participating in the annual Dad Vail Regatta.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. If a wealthy descendant of the original Swedish settlers had not dug in his heels, this borough on the Jersey side of the Delaware River from Tacony would still be called Texas . But landowner Isaiah Toy considered that name, given to the stretch of Burlington County shoreline by the Camden & Amboy Railroad, "inappropriate" and, the official...
NEWS
September 25, 1995
Hidden River. In Dutch, that's what Schuylkill means. Not that the oarsmen out there most mornings - still in shirtsleeves, even as fall intrudes - have any trouble finding their treasured reach of the river. Nor the joggers, skaters, cyclists and strollers who eagerly ply its banks to the north and west of Center City. Nearby, though, there is a hidden Schuylkill - the stretch, oddly, that flows right past the bustling downtown, from the Art Museum to the Delaware. Little-seen, except at breakneck speeds from the expressway, its banks are used even less, and that mostly for illicit goings-on.
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NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THE $18 MILLION Schuylkill Banks Boardwalk opens today, so Philadelphians and their leashed dogs can "walk on water" from Locust Street to the South Street Bridge. Bike on water, too. Built out into the river parallel to the east bank, the 2,000-foot boardwalk experience is a heady mix of ducks and trucks, trees and breeze, cityscape and landscape, roadway and waterway, industrial and pastoral, trains and turtles, big sky and big city. Strolling along the city's newest people magnet yesterday, Joseph Syrnick, president/CEO of the Schuylkill River Development Corporation, who has spent eight years guiding the project from drawing board to boardwalk, talked about the romance of the river.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. If a wealthy descendant of the original Swedish settlers had not dug in his heels, this borough on the Jersey side of the Delaware River from Tacony would still be called Texas . But landowner Isaiah Toy considered that name, given to the stretch of Burlington County shoreline by the Camden & Amboy Railroad, "inappropriate" and, the official...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia spent the last decade working out a single, knotty planning problem: How should the old industrial spaces on the Delaware waterfront evolve? The consensus was that vacant land would be developed to resemble the rest of the city, with walkable streets, a mix of uses, and lively ground floors. No one was naive enough to think such projects could be realized without parking garages, but the expectation was that the structures would not dominate the river. It's a shame the conversation was never extended to the city's other riverfront, the Schuylkill, which has come alive since a trail park pushed into Center City.
NEWS
August 9, 2012
East River Bank is expanding into Old City with the purchase of a branch on North Third Street from Vist Financial, which was acquired last week by Tomkins Financial Corp. The deal is expected to be completed in October, pending regulatory approvals, and will involve the transfer of about $5.5 million in deposits to East River, which now has two branches, in East Falls and Roxborough. At the end of March, East River had $194 million in deposits and $171 million in loans outstanding, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
HERE'S WHAT WILL make news in Philly this week: SCHOOLS Supe-search hearing The Philadelphia School District will continue its series of community forums as part of the search for a new superintendent with three meetings this week. The meetings, organized by the United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania and the Penn Project for Civic Engagement, are all at 6:30; tonight at West Philadelphia High School, Wednesday at Strawberry Mansion High School and Thursday at Edison High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
Mother's Day of late has devolved into a series of Sunday brunches and big bouquets and tithing to Hallmark for the biggest and most monumental card available. Doesn't Mom deserve more than the cliché, though? Anna Jarvis, the Philadelphia woman who was the spirit behind the modern Mother's Day holiday, wanted the occasion to be more than that - with real celebrations and appropriate personal huzzahs - for Mom. Behold, a few things somewhat off-the-Mommy-track for this year:   Boat trip to Bartram's John Bartram was America's first celebrity botanist.
NEWS
September 15, 2004 | By WALTER J. GERSHENFELD
THE ISRAELI-Palestinian dispute has been labeled intractable at present by many authorities. Suicide bombings and retaliation have hardened positions on both sides. The wall and mixed positions on disengagement from Gaza have created new problems. Important changes are needed for a long-term settlement. But that should not stop us from looking for interim approaches designed to help us move forward, both within and outside the box, in the search for an equitable peace. The suggestion that follows is an outside-the-box suggestion.
NEWS
July 8, 2002 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
When Philadelphia received a $14 million federal grant in 1993 to extend the Kelly Drive recreational trail south along the Schuylkill to Locust Street, the project was seen as more than just an amenity. It was hailed as an economic catalyst that would spur housing construction, attract business and boost property values. But today, the east bank of the Schuylkill is largely the same trash-strewn wasteland it was a decade ago. Homeless people still camp in the undergrowth, and prostitutes conduct a flourishing trade just steps from the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Only the intrepid jog and bicycle along the trail, which has been blocked off by a chain-link fence since fire damaged the Waterworks in February.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a revised indictment, a Norristown woman was charged in U.S. District Court yesterday with helping to rob an East Pikeland bank by drawing a floor plan of the building and supplying a car used in the robbery. April Knight, 25, of the 500 block of Chain Street, is accused of assisting in the Nov. 24 robbery of the First Union Bank in the Valley Forge Mall, which ended in a shoot-out with police. A nearby elementary school was set on fire as a diversion, authorities said. Knight, who did not participate in the robbery, has not been arrested.
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / PABLO ALCALA
The nimble feet of students at the Campbell Academy of Dance put on a show of step dancing at the Revel on the River. Dinner, jazz and fireworks rounded out Saturday's gala at the Fairmount Water Works. It was held to raise money for construction of the Schuylkill River Park along the east bank.
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