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Easter Week

NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Snow, ice, and power outages have forced some area colleges to shut down for as many as eight days since the start of the second semester in mid-January, putting them in a position of scrambling to make up the time before the school year ends. Some have asked professors to use more online lectures, journals, blogs, quizzes, database research, and other methods that do not require face-to-face meetings. Others are taking different approaches. Villanova University will begin offering instruction on Sundays to make up for seven lost days.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1999 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There's something about the South - the South of literature and film, anyway - that lends itself to eccentricity. In the sly, shambling Cookie's Fortune, Robert Altman, who knows a thing or two about the offbeat, the crazy and the decidedly strange, drops in on the sleepy Mississippi burg of Holly Springs. The place is acrawl with characters. Real characters. There's Camille Dixon (Glenn Close), a self-styled artiste who puts on patrician airs and who is putting on a community theater version of Salome, with writing credits "by Oscar Wilde and Camille Dixon.
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | by Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer
Two weeks ago, 2,500 Mary Kay sales reps came to town for their annual meeting, and now Philadelphia is awash in pink: Lipstick-pink career separates at Strawbridge's and Wanamaker's. Bubblegum-pink vinyl boots on trendy clubgoers. TV blonde Nancy Glass in a pale pink suit doing an "American Journal" segment on a pale-pink-suited Princess Di. But don't blame Mary Kay legions for the outbreak. "Versace is the one who did it," sniffs fashion industry analyst Alan Millstein, who is not among the pink enthusiasts.
NEWS
April 18, 2011 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Schoolchildren missed out on seeing the famous mastodon skeleton. News events and high-level meetings were scrapped or relocated, and some unlucky state workers were forced to use outdoor toilets. All because of a water-main rupture several hundred yards behind the Capitol. The break forced a rare shutdown of the state government complex, sending thousands of workers home, disrupting business, and disappointing hundreds of children on their spring trip to the state museum.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Dennis McKernan is an optimist. And the Owen J. Roberts baseball coach has his reason. He has an experienced, senior-oriented team, including two outstanding pitchers, and plenty of guys who can hit the ball. So, hopes that the Wildcats can find themselves contending for the Pioneer Athletic Conference title are certainly not unreasonable. Optimistic maybe, but not unreasonable. The loss of McKernan's son, Jamie, for the rest of the season because of academic ineligibility was a significant one for the Wildcats, but the coach remains optimistic.
NEWS
November 21, 2006 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The international Irish dance association has decided to bring its 2009 world championships to Philadelphia, marking the first time the annual event will be held outside the British Isles. The gathering is expected to bring up to 20,000 dancers and their relatives, teachers and friends to the city during Easter Week, usually a slow period for conventions. The decision by Dublin-based An Coimisi?n le Rinc? Gaelacha (the Irish Dance Commission) to hold its world championships in the city comes as 2,200 Irish dancers and their families are scheduled to gather in Philadelphia this Thanksgiving weekend for the annual Mid-Atlantic Championships at the Center City Marriott Hotel.
NEWS
April 25, 2003 | By VANCE LEHMKUHL
'HEY, didja hear about the PETA thing?" someone snickers, and I cringe. Now what? The "Holocaust on Your Plate" campaign, which is as offensive as it sounds, or the appeal to Yasser Arafat to exclude animals from terrorist missions, or the Easter-week billboard showing a pig and the phrase "He died for your sins," or one of the other shock-value stunts PETA's pulled lately? Unlike most PETA critics, I share the "extremist" goal behind these moves: bringing to public attention the injustices animals suffer.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | By Bob Hoffman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There was no rally yesterday. Nor any come-from-behind heroics. On April 10, Bishop Eustace gave up a six-run lead and lost an Olympic Conference National Division softball game to Triton, 7-6. Yesterday was a different story. The Crusaders built an early eight-run bulge in the rematch and had no trouble holding on, winning 9-0. "Yes, we talked about the first game today," Bishop Eustace coach Mike Sacca said. "I told the kids before the game that if we jumped out early, we weren't going to stop.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1990 | By Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
Don't be fooled by the title "Slick Sloan and the Case of the Missing Eggs," which sounds like an Easter-week children's caper. Frozen, fertilized human embryos are the subject of the new dance theater piece created by the local troupe Danceteller. And while this is most definitely not children's theater, Danceteller has made something of a name for tackling tricky subjects in a clever manner. Two years ago, Danceteller created a full-length work about AIDS, "Before Forever," the text of which was pieced together from comments of actual AIDS sufferers.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
On March 20, 1917, Hans C. Gordon rode the Ridge Avenue trolley with his future bride, Sarah Elizabeth Hall. It was their first date. For the next 71 years, Dr. Gordon and his wife celebrated the anniversary of that first date until Mrs. Gordon died - on March 20, 1988. Dr. Gordon, 95, a longtime teacher in the city school district, and a former special education director, died Wednesday at the Lutheran Home in Germantown. He was a former resident of West Mount Airy. Dr. Gordon was grief-stricken the last three years of his life over the woman he always referred to as his "one and only," family members said.
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