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Eastern Europe

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NEWS
March 4, 1991 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / APRIL SAUL
Traditions of Eastern Europe were celebrated in song and dance yesterday at the Camden County Historical Society. There was a church choir performing Polish folk songs, a singing college student from Lithuania and a band and dancers from North Jersey. The free festival was the sixth the historical society has hosted, the first on Eastern European culture.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1990 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Long before the recent political changes there, Rorer Group Inc. resolved, for purely economic reasons, that it would take its Maalox antacid, a new heart drug and other medicines to the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Now, the Fort Washington drug firm sees itself in a good spot as drug firms shore up their positions in Eastern bloc countries. "We have drug registrations either approved or pending in the majority of the countries in Eastern Europe," said Jeff Richardson, a Rorer spokesman.
NEWS
October 6, 1993 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"The Crisis in Society and Religion in Eastern Europe" is the title of a series of free lectures that will be offered at the McShain Auditorium of Rosemont College, Montgomery and Wendover Avenues. All programs will start at 7 p.m. These are the dates and countries that will be discussed: Tuesday, the Czech Republic, with Jakub Trojan, dean of the Protestant Theological Faculty of Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. Nov. 2, Bulgaria, with Maria Dimitrova-Gungov and Alexander Gungov, professors of philosophy, University of Sofia, Bulgaria.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1989 | By David Everett, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Western companies, including U.S. corporations, should consider building manufacturing plants in Eastern Europe within the next few years if the historic political upheavals continue there, the next chairman of Ford Motor Co. said yesterday. But Harold "Red" Poling, Ford's vice chairman and the man who once ran European operations for the nation's second-largest automaker, said the Soviet Union and its satellite nations must solve currency and financial problems that have kept Ford and other companies away.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | By Kenneth L. Whiting, Associated Press
The European Community's effort to revive the economies of Eastern Europe causes anxiety among Southeast Asian nations that seek aid and investment. While welcoming the emergence of democracy in the former Soviet bloc, some members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) worry that resources will be diverted to that region at their expense. Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore, Brunei and the Philippines make up the association, formed in 1967 to foster regional economic and cultural development.
NEWS
December 26, 1988 | By TRUDY RUBIN
While world attention has been focusing on the changes going on in the Soviet Union, even more startling shifts have been taking place in Moscow's European empire. Eastern Europe, that chunk of Europe which - in Winston Churchill's immortal words - disappeared behind a Soviet-imposed "iron curtain" after World War II, is re-emerging as the most volatile part of Europe today. This doesn't mean that East Germany, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria have suddenly shed their communist bonds.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
Toxic white gas spewing from the Glogow copper smelter's three tall towers across the Odra River drifted over this dying farming village, the surrounding fields burned black and lifeless, workers dismantling the buildings brick by brick. "This was a beautiful place and they have destroyed it. We are innocent and they have destroyed the work of a lifetime," said a bitter farmer, her voice raw from the stinging fumes. "I eat copper and lead all the time. My eyes feel as if I'd rubbed sand in them.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Senate Democratic leaders introduced legislation yesterday that sharply increases U.S. support for democratic movements in Eastern Europe, including money to help six nations run elections this year. In a novel twist, the legislation includes a provision that would open the door to aid to the Soviet Union for the first time to develop "free political and economic institutions. " The group, headed by Sen. Claiborne Pell (D., R.I.), chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, contended that the administration had been too slow in responding to revolutionary change in the communist world, creating a risk that fledgling democratic movements might fail.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Pope John Paul II yesterday praised the reforms remaking the East bloc and said that bloodshed in Romania was the only sad and painful exception in a year of peaceful democratic change in Eastern Europe. The Pope noted that the changes in Eastern Europe have come 50 years after the outbreak of World War II, which he called the "beginning of the tragedy. " He said the Eastern Europeans are "finally emerging as winners. " He called Christmas Eve a "wait full of hope as we prepare to welcome Christ, who comes to us as savior of the world.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1990 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the early, euphoric days of the anti-socialist revolution in Eastern Europe, it was suggested that the strongest of the Eastern economies might take three to five years to make the transition to functioning capitalism. Now, 11 months after the fall of the Berlin Wall, sober Western economists are saying it could take five to 10 years. Yesterday, a Korean economist who helped move South Korea onto the economic fast track told a gathering at the Four Seasons Hotel that those estimates were far too optimistic.
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TRAVEL
March 15, 2015 | By Rick Steves, For The Inquirer
Eastern Europe has experienced more change in the last generation than any other corner of Europe. With war-era grandpas now gone, across the former Warsaw Pact zone new museums and memorials deal candidly with the dark side of communism - and fascism before that. Here's the latest: In Prague, the National Museum on Wenceslas Square is wrapping up a long renovation. By mid-2015, visitors should be able to see its interior, decorated in the Czech Revival style that heralded the 19th-century rebirth of the Czech nation.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fields, at first, appear unremarkable. These mass graves from the Holocaust weren't supposed to stick out. But the Rev. Patrick Desbois has devoted his life to finding them. Slowly, during visits to barren landscapes across Eastern Europe, the French priest will uncover artifacts hinting at the horrors that took place there decades ago: A shard of jewelry left tossed in a bush. A shell casing covered by overgrown grass. What Desbois finds most often, however, are stories from local villagers - witnesses who've remained and told him what they remember.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Jerry Iannelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Austin Cook shifts his weight onto his back leg as he raises the blade of a hockey stick behind his ear. He brings the stick down onto a rubber puck with the full force of his body, and the disc clangs against the side of a makeshift goal, ricocheting into the family garage. He'd lost count of the number of shots taken that morning after his 300th. When he's satisfied with himself, he scurries inside to grab his backpack and heads to catch the bus to Dwight D. Eisenhower Middle School.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
"Through the skin we let the whole world in. " So begins the poem, written and recited by Karl Mullen, that provides the title for the featured piece in last weekend's program by the Koresh Dance Company at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre. Made up of 15 short segments, the work showcases signature elements of Roni Koresh's choreography, his favorite theatrical effects, and the remarkable technical abilities of his 10 performers. Like many of the pieces Koresh has created over the last two decades, Through the Skin combines jazz-dance staples (jutting hips)
BUSINESS
October 16, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Investors are witnessing our transformation from a functioning democracy to a dysfunctional political mud wrestle, thus making some emerging markets outside the United States look stable and inviting. Emerging markets, however, experienced a panicky sell-off this year, a plunge that ended around May 1, so it's important to tread carefully. We checked in with Peter Kohli, a portfolio manager who runs DMS Funds in Leesport, Berks County, "just at the end of the Reading airport runway," as he describes it. We wanted to find out why he likes emerging markets so much these days, in particular Central and Eastern Europe, and how investors can put money to work the way he does.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Charles Krauthammer
"This war, like all wars, must end. That's what history advises ... " - Barack Obama, May 23 Nice thought. But much as President Obama would like to close his eyes, click his heels three times, and declare the war on terror over, war is a two-way street. That's what history advises: Two sides to fight it, two to end it. By surrender (World War II), by armistice (Korea and Vietnam), or when the enemy simply disappears from the field (the Cold War). Obama says enough is enough.
FOOD
February 21, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Stuffed cabbage recipes are the realm of grandmothers and winter. I grew up with a sweet-and-sour beef and rice version simmered in lemony tomato sauce, just like many other Philadelphians of Jewish descent. We called it prakas, a Yiddish name with roots in Eastern Europe. Whatever your background, there are likely cabbage roll recipes in your family ancestry. Poles have golabki, Czechs and Slovaks call it holubky; Turks and Armenians eat dolmas. In Quebec you can ask for cigares au chou.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | Kevin Riordan
At the Jewish Genealogical Fair in Cherry Hill, I listen to different voices tell the same story. "I want to find my grandfather. …" "She came here in 1916. …" "He changed his name. …" To the last comment, Steve Schecter, vice president of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia, offers a ready observation. "They all changed their names," says the Mount Laurel retiree, 66, whose paternal grandfather came to America from what is now Belarus, shucking his Schullriekter surname along the way. The old names were back on Sunday at Temple Beth Shalom, as 150 people queried representatives of public archives, such as the Camden County Historical Society, and private organizations, including the Jewish Federation of Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem Counties.
TRAVEL
March 25, 2012 | By John Cech, For The Inquirer
I am on a plane traveling to California for what I know will be the last time to see my father, who is succumbing to congestive heart failure. My wife in her wonderful way, knowing the pain this trip entails, slipped an Inquirer Travel article into my briefcase about a man who traveled with his father back to the small Italian village they were from. As I read it, memories of a similar pilgrimage came flooding back like rereading an old love letter. In my job, I have been fortunate to travel the world - mostly with people who were familiar with the regions and companies I was seeing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
OF ALL Shakespeare's tragic heroes, Coriolanus has been described as the hardest to warm up to. Not a charmer, that Coriolanus. Didn't have a nice word to say about anyone, except somebody he was determined to kill in battle. The Roman general was remarkably brave in battles fought to preserve the safety of his country's citizens, remarkably full of contempt for those same folks. Shakespeare was fascinated by this contradiction, and wrote some of his best stuff for this character, making Coriolanus the blunt-speaking counterpoint to the silver-tongued Henry V. When Coriolanus (played in this adaptation set in contemporary Eastern Europe by Ralph Fiennes)
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