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Easy Goer

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April 23, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Easy Goer answered another question yesterday, and he did it in his usual nonchalant fashion. In his only previous start around two turns, Easy Goer had been upset in his final race as a 2-year-old, the Breeders' Cup Juvenile. "Now we don't have to worry about whether he can run two turns," trainer Shug McGaughey said after Easy Goer, a 1-10 favorite, played with five rivals in winning the 1 1/8-mile Wood Memorial at Aqueduct yesterday. The son of Alydar will leave Wednesday for Louisville, Ky., where he is favored to win the Kentucky Derby on May 6. Easy Goer, ridden by Pat Day, stalked the pace until a little more than a quarter-mile remained in the Wood, then took the lead and won by three lengths over Rock Point in 1:50 3/5. "Pat Day did a nice job - he set just behind the pace and let him finish up," McGaughey said.
SPORTS
April 9, 1989 | By Jay Searcy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Easy Goer, running the fastest mile ever in New York state, sailed past a badly outclassed field of four in the $250,000-added Gotham Stakes at Aqueduct yesterday, taking another easy step toward next month's Kentucky Derby. Last year's 2-year-old Kentucky homebred champion won by 13 lengths in running the mile in 1:32 2/5, a full second faster than the legendary Secretariat, who set the Gotham record here in 1973. Easy Goer is owned by Ogden Phipps. In only his second start of the season, Easy Goer missed Dr. Fager's 21- year-old world record for the distance by just one-fifth of a second.
SPORTS
August 21, 1990 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Trainer Shug McGaughey won Saturday's Travers Stakes with Rhythm, but there is an empty stall in his barn, an empty spot in his heart. The Big Horse, Easy Goer, is gone, back home in Kentucky, where he will try to reproduce his greatness next year. This was going to be the year Easy Goer settled all his scores, made up for all the close losses, ran down all the horses in the stretch. Lingering ankle problems plagued the massive chestnut last year. Finally, the stress became too much, the X-rays brought bad news and Easy Goer was retired last month.
SPORTS
May 5, 1989 | By Russ Harris, Special to The Inquirer
The entry of Easy Goer, owned by Ogden Phipps, and Awe Inspiring, owned by Ogden Mills Phipps, was made the 3-5 favorite against 14 opponents yesterday as entries were drawn for tomorrow's $759,200 Kentucky Derby. The 115th running of the Derby will be worth $584,200 to the winner, $100,000 for second, $50,000 for third and $25,000 for fourth. The race (Channel 6, 4:40 p.m.) will be simulcast to Garden State Park, Delaware Park, Atlantic City race course, Philadelphia Park and Penn National.
SPORTS
October 25, 1989 | By Russ Harris, Special to The Inquirer
It will be Easy Goer, the 3-5 favorite, and Sunday Silence, the 2-1 second choice, clashing in a field of eight in the $3 million Breeders' Cup Classic on Nov. 4 at Gulfstream Park. The outcome of the 1 1/4-mile Classic will decide Horse of the Year honors for 1989. A total of 101 of the world's best thoroughbreds were pre-entered yesterday for the seven Breeders' Cup events. Since there is a limit of 14 horses for each race, several of them will not go postward on the sixth Breeders' Cup day. In addition to Easy Goer, the Belmont Stakes and Travers winner, and Sunday Silence, the Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner, the Classic field will consist of Present Value, 4-1; Cryptoclearance, 5-1; Mi Selecto, 5-1; Blushing John, 8-1; Western Playboy, 10-1, and Slew City Slew, 20-1.
SPORTS
August 21, 1989 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
When Easy Goer races now, it's a happening. He runs as much for his fans as against his opponents. Saturday, a near-record Travers Stakes throng pressed against the barricades to get a glimpse of its hero on the way to be saddled, in the tree-lined paddock and on the track. There were no disappointments. Easy Goer is housed in an area of Saratoga so far removed from the main stable area that it is called Oklahoma. The Phipps Stable horses are at the far corner of the distant reaches of Oklahoma.
SPORTS
April 24, 1989 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
As Easy Goer came charging into Aqueduct's paddock late Saturday afternoon, the chilling mid-April wind blowing off Jamaica Bay froze the scene. The Kentucky Derby favorite, minutes before his final tuneup in the Wood Memorial, was breathing fire. He charged down the little slope to the saddling area. Then, Easy Goer was led into his stall, where he calmed down instantly, seemingly aware that he soon would get his chance to expend some of that pent- up energy. One minute, Easy Goer has the look of a wild horse.
SPORTS
August 18, 1989 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The promise of winter gave way to the anguish of spring. Those spring failures have given way to a summertime of fulfillment and the promise of more to come. Easy Goer's time was supposed to be the Triple Crown. It didn't happen until the last possible moment, but the Belmont Stakes explosion happened and it's still happening. Easy Goer was America's horse before the Triple Crown. Many abandoned ship after the Kentucky Derby and Preakness, but those who stayed aboard might be in for the ride of their lives.
SPORTS
May 6, 1989 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
When Kentucky Derby favorite Easy Goer finally emerges from the shadows of the Churchill Downs backstretch late this afternoon, he will be carrying the hopes and dreams of his aged owner Ogden Phipps, his young trainer Shug McGaughey and his veteran jockey Pat Day. As Easy Goer makes the long walk around the clubhouse turn to the teeming paddock behind the overflowing grandstand, the colt's biggest fan will be nearby. Mary Jane McGaughey, Shug's wife, was Easy Goer's exercise rider.
SPORTS
June 9, 1989 | By Jay Searcy, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Belmont Stakes will start Saturday afternoon just as the Preakness ended three weeks ago - with the two favorites side by side. Sunday Silence, who needs to win the Belmont to become only the 12th Triple Crown winner, drew Gate 6, and his chief rival, Easy Goer, drew Gate 7 at yesterday's traditional breakfast draw. The trainers for both colts said it was perfect. "He's quick out of the gate, Shug, so you'd better look out," Sunday Silence's trainer, Charlie Whittingham, said to Shug McGaughey, trainer of Easy Goer.
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SPORTS
May 7, 2013 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Twenty-four years ago, it was brutally cold and incredibly wet on the first Saturday in May when a 38-year-old Shug McGaughey, just 10 years into a training career that would land him in the Hall of Fame, brought Easy Goer over from the barn to the paddock at Churchill Downs for the Kentucky Derby. There was little doubt Easy Goer, a horse that also would wind up in the Hall of Fame, was going to win the Derby. Fast forward to Saturday, a day that dawned cool, but not that cool, with overcast skies that turned to a drizzle and eventual soaking rain, a track surface that went from fast to sloppy, a Derby where Shug once again had the favorite, but not a horse that had the résumé of Easy Goer.
SPORTS
August 20, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Sunday Silence, the winner of the first two Triple Crown races in 1989, died Sunday night in Japan from complications of a disease in his left foreleg. After going unsold at auction, Sunday Silence went on to win the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes. The 16-year-old horse died of heart failure on Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan. Sunday Silence, who had an exciting rivalry with Easy Goer, won nine races in 14 career starts, earning $4,968,554. He was inducted into horse racing's Hall of Fame in 1996.
SPORTS
April 21, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Charlie Whittingham, one of the greatest trainers in thoroughbred racing and twice a winner of the Kentucky Derby, died yesterday in Pasadena, Calif., of leukemia. He was 86. The three-time Eclipse Award winner was taken from his home in Sierra Madre, Calif., by ambulance to Saint Luke Medical Center at 6:30 a.m. He died about 8:30 a.m., said his wife, Peggy. "We had a birthday party for him last week. And he was able to go to the races on Sunday, when he had two horses running," she said.
SPORTS
July 23, 1998 | By Craig Donnelly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Undefeated Relaxing Rhythm will go postward as the favorite in Sunday's $500,000 Delaware Handicap and face last year's 3-year-old filly champion, Ajina, and seven other fillies and mares. The Del 'Cap, a Grade III event raced at 1 1/4 miles, is the headliner of the Delaware Park meeting and is one of seven stakes, worth $2.15 million, to be contested this weekend at the track in Stanton, Del. Relaxing Rhythm will carry 117 pounds for the Stronach Stables and trainer Patrick Byrne.
SPORTS
August 5, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Four-time champions Fred Couples and Davis Love III were named yesterday to represent the United States in the World Cup of Golf on Kiawah Island, Nov. 17-23. Couples and Love won the international two-man competition from 1992 to 1995. Burch Riber, executive director of the International Golf Association, asked Tiger Woods to participate and talked to Woods's managers about the event. But Woods said he was tied up with a busy Asian and Hawaiian schedule in November. "It was obvious early on that he would not be able to play," Riber said from his office in Cincinnati.
SPORTS
March 30, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Concerto won the $600,000 Jim Beam Stakes yesterday at Turfway Park after Inexcessivelygood broke down during a stretch duel with him. Inexcessivelygood suffered a dislocated right front ankle and threw jockey Chris McCarron. The colt was humanely destroyed. McCarron was taken to a hospital for observation. Concerto, the 6-5 favorite owned by George Steinbrenner and ridden by Carlos Marquez Jr., ran 1 1/8 miles in 1 minute, 48 1/5 seconds, nearly two seconds slower than Hansel's track record, despite a fast track that had yielded a record at 1 1/16 miles earlier in the day. Jack Flash finished second, 2 1/2 lengths behind Concerto, and Shammy Davis was another half-length back.
SPORTS
June 24, 1994 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
They have this stall at Claiborne Farm in Paris, Ky., a stall with a reserved sign. To reside in this stall, a horse must have performed wondrous feats on the race track. And after the horse retires, the farm operators must think he will be able to produce horses in his image. They gave the stall to Bold Ruler, the fastest horse in the crop of 3-year- olds from 1957, the best in American racing history. He produced champions, including Secretariat, the champion of champions. When he retired, they gave the stall to Secretariat.
SPORTS
May 31, 1993 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Lance Armstrong, a first-year pro, posted a 54-second victory yesterday at the Kmart Classic in Charleston, W. Va., setting up a chance to win a $1 million bonus at next weekend's CoreStates U.S. Pro Cycling Championship in Philadelphia. Armstrong, 21, of Austin, Texas, held onto the advantage he enjoyed entering the final 100-mile circuit of the 493.5-mile, five-stage race. Armstrong has won the first two legs of the Thrift Drug Triple Crown cycling series. In addition to his Kmart Classic victory, he won the one-day, 120-mile Thrift Drug Classic on May 23 in Pittsburgh.
SPORTS
June 7, 1992 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bring Arazi back. Run the Triple Crown races over again. America has a superstar colt, after all, and his name is A.P. Indy. He has a Japanese owner and a British trainer, but he is a good, old- fashioned Kentucky bred and he won the New York Belmont Stakes yesterday with a good-old-boy, Cajun jockey on his back. Dropping back about four to five lengths down the backstretch to avoid being trapped, jockey Eddie Delahoussaye steered the handsome $2.9 million ridgeling from fourth to first in the last quarter-mile of the 1 1/2-mile race and beat the British horse My Memoirs to the wire by three-quarters of a length.
SPORTS
October 26, 1990 | By Jay Searcy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Where have you gone, Sunday Silence? Where are you, Easy Goer? And Summer Squall? And Housebuster? Here we are on the eve of the greatest day in thoroughbred racing, the seventh running of the $10 million Breeders' Cup, and not one of the superstars of the last two years is here. The Breeders' Cup was going to give us the long-awaited rematch of Sunday Silence and Easy Goer. But, alas, Sunday Silence is living in Japan now, with new owners, a stud at age 4. Easy Goer?
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