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Ebay

NEWS
July 29, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
What Etsy makes, the world takes. Haven't heard of Etsy? That's about to change. Because Etsy.com, founded by three former New York University students, including Chris Maguire of Roxborough, has quickly become the go-to site for all things handmade, and all the communities that surround and support craft work. Since its 2005 start, Etsy.com has become so popular that it has spawned apostles who have formed "street teams" in various cities. Etsyians, they're called. And what they've created online amounts to a virtual international craft fair - without the corn dogs: Concertinapieces in North Bend, Ind., sells intricately woven acrylic yarn toys with names like "Vlad the Blood Orange" for $6. Jacquelineknits of Woodbridge, Ontario, hawks hand-knit, hot-pink apple jackets - to protect your fruit from bruising - for $7. Katrinakaye of Amsterdam coolly combines vintage Scandinavian fabrics and army bags for $35 purses named "Skipper" and "Wedge.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2007 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
If you've thought of taking your business - large or tiny - overseas, but aren't sure how, here are a few Web sites that could get you started: Selling eBay. In the ever-shrinking world of commerce, nobody has done more than eBay to include the "little guy. " On eBay, sellers - or people thinking of being sellers - can use this page to check out the benefits and pitfalls of marketing their widgets internationally. More business. A set of simple how-to guides on this site could help new entrepreneurs with selling abroad, starting or buying a business, building a Web site, marketing and managing a company.
LIVING
July 6, 2007 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Back in occupied Italy at the end of World War II, the story goes, naive GIs frequently purchased "ancient" Roman coins at bargain prices, proof of age being substantiated by the dates stamped upon them - 43 B.C., for instance. Well, the old coin minted in the final days of the Roman Republic that will be offered Thursday by Alderfer Auction & Appraisal bears no such date. Consequently, it is expected to sell for $600 to $800, according to the online catalog, most easily accessed at www.liveauctions.
NEWS
April 5, 2007 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gettysburg, Pa., book publisher Dean Thomas was browsing through Civil War documents for sale on eBay in September when he noticed something familiar about one of them. He went to a folder at his house and found a photocopy of the same document, which he made at the National Archives 20 years earlier. It had the same ink blotches and smudges. "I thought the archives was either having a sale or it was stolen," Thomas, 58, said. "And I knew the archives wasn't having a sale.
NEWS
March 16, 2007 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 40-year-old summer intern smuggled 165 Civil War-era documents from National Archives offices in Philadelphia and sold them on eBay, officials said yesterday. The intern, Denning McTague, used a backpack to sneak letters, telegrams and military orders - including one announcing the death of President Lincoln - from the archives' Market Street office. Such thievery is rare, said Susan Cooper, a spokeswoman for the National Archives in Washington. "I've been here 25 years and I can only remember three or four cases like this," she said.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2006 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Silicon Valley tech firms Apple, eBay and Advanced Micro Devices reported higher quarterly profits after the markets closed yesterday, but AMD shares fell in extended trading when the company said profit margins had declined. The results followed earnings statements a day earlier reporting significant profit declines at tech firms Yahoo Inc., Motorola Inc., and AMD rival Intel Corp. Apple Computer Inc. said its fiscal fourth-quarter profit rose 27 percent, well past analysts' expectations, boosted by sizzling sales of its iPod music players and Macintosh computers.
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | By Adam Fifield, Rita Giordano and Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
He came, slapped his knee and giggled with glee, fell to the floor, and begged for more. And then he disappeared. Sort of. At stores across the region yesterday, parents were dismayed to find shelves bare of T.M.X. Elmo, the 10th anniversary incarnation of the furry, red doll unveiled by Fisher-Price just 24 hours before. Going online, shoppers soon learned that the shortage was made even worse by a raid on retail outlets by speculators who had listed an army of Elmos on eBay.
LIVING
February 17, 2006 | By Claire Whitcomb FOR THE INQUIRER
As eBay has grown from a virtual flea market to a market force, it's also grown up. Now, it's possible to click and find sophisticated home-decorating resources - everything from Ralph Lauren wallpaper to McCoy pottery. Type in "damask upholstery fabric," for example, and on a typical day you'll find 90 listings for items such as five yards of a Brunschwig & Fils blue-and-gold silk stripe (retail $100 a yard). The eBay cost: a lot less. Providing, of course, that you resist the adrenaline rush of online bidding and don't overpay.
NEWS
December 3, 2005 | By Mario F. Cattabiani and Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Dine with Flavia. Drink with Flavia. Hang with Flavia as she flitters around Manhattan. This and much more could be yours on eBay, where Flavia Colgan, the head-turning MSNBC commentator and former chief of staff for Lt. Gov. Catherine Baker Knoll, is auctioning herself for charity. The date will be worked around the Pennsylvania Society social gathering, next weekend's annual extravaganza for Pennsylvania pols in New York City. The plan is she'll pick you up at the train station in a town car, and whisk you off to the MSNBC studio in New Jersey, where you will meet talk-show host Tucker Carlson before returning to Midtown for more tapings and more parties.
NEWS
November 16, 2005 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The original Star Trek television series lasted only three years (1966 to 1969) and wasn't much of a hit in its time. But as any Trekkie will happily inform you (telepathically or otherwise), it had a latent meteoric impact on American pop culture. We don't want to pass judgment on those who idolize the former cast members. We don't understand them. But hey. We never understood James Joyce, either. Still, there is something a bit strange in the latest news from the Starship Enterprise.
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