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Ebenezer Scrooge

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NEWS
November 21, 2006 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
This time of year, productions of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol stud the landscape like hunks of candied orange peel on a fruitcake. Much like the ubiquitous holiday dessert, those productions often end up sodden relics of a tradition that began with the best of intentions but became dreaded byproducts of seasonal tyranny. In Bristol Riverside Theatre's production of The Trial of Ebenezer Scrooge, Scrooge has reverted to his holiday-hating self, and the three ghosts, plus Scrooge's former business partner, Jacob Marley, are now on trial for kidnapping, breaking and entering, and other offenses related to that fateful night exactly one year earlier, when Scrooge discovered his Christmas spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
No Christmas - past, present or future - would be complete without Ebenezer Scrooge. Since the days of the silents, Charles Dickens' immortal miser has pinched his pennies in many movies, including musicals, animated features and even a nattily and nastily updated spin on the story from Bill Murray in Scrooged. Talents as diverse as George C. Scott, Albert Finney and Star Trek's Patrick Stewart (currently scrooging them in on Broadway) have humbugged their way through the transformation of fiction's most storied skinflint.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Just when you think you've reached your lifetime quota of Christmas Carols, along comes a genuinely original production. There are, currently, at least four professional productions of stage adaptations of Charles Dickens' famous story on the boards locally (and who knows how many others lurking in high school auditoriums and community theaters), plus the inevitable TV screenings of the movie versions. But the Christmas Carol at Mum Puppettheatre is a two-man, many-puppet show. Of course, it's still the same old story, of tightwad taskmaster Ebenezer Scrooge and the visits by three ghosts, as the cosmos stages some last-ditch attempt to save him from his own inhumanity.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Britain will issue five commemoratives Tuesday recalling the 150th anniversary of the publication of A Christmas Carol, perhaps the most enduring children's holiday story. The stamps include the characters in Charles Dickens' classic: Tiny Tim, Bob Cratchit, Mr. and Mrs. Fezziwig, Ebenezer Scrooge's nephew and, of course, Scrooge himself. Dickens was 31 when he completed A Christmas Carol in early December of 1843 after just six weeks of writing. He already was the acclaimed author of such works as Oliver Twist, and in its first week, A Christmas Carol, decorated in red binding and gilt design, sold 6,000 copies.
NEWS
July 9, 1996 | by Richard Huff, For the Daily News
Yes, there can be a Christmas in July. Cable's TBS is going to prove it today by turning its schedule over to Christmas specials, Christmas movies and Christmas-themed episodes of such series as "Little House on the Prairie," "Bewitched," "Gilligan's Island" and "Family Matters. " The Yuletide cheer gets under way at 6:05 a.m. and will continue until 4:05 a.m. tomorrow. In fact, the only things missing will be mistletoe and, of course, cold weather. The day kicks off with the animated "Captain Planet and the Planeteers," which features an episode titled "Ghost of Porkaloin Past," a takeoff of the classic "A Christmas Carol.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
If you know John Astin from his role as Gomez in The Addams Family television show, you won't recognize him on the stage of the Merriam Theater, where he is starring in A Christmas Carol. The makeup Astin wears to play the elderly Ebenezer Scrooge pretty much obscures the actor's familiar features. And judging from his performance, that's just the way Astin wants it. He obviously wants the audience to see the character rather than the actor playing him. He creates a very credible Scrooge and shows in the process that, though he may be best-known from appearing on television, he is also a stage actor with presence and authority.
NEWS
December 6, 2011
JUST IN TIME for Christmas, hardworking taxpayers Bob Cratchit and his family (the downtrodden American public) will be wondering what decisions Jacob Marley and Ebenezer Scrooge (Sen. Mitch McConnell and Rep. John Boehner) will be making about their economic futures. It will be interesting to watch how this modern-day Christmas story plays out. Will they side with the Cratchit family and Tiny Tim and raise taxes on themselves and banker Henry A. Potter (Wall Street CEOs)? Or, will they continue to require that banker Potter continue his Wonderful Life with his historic-low taxation entitlement?
NEWS
December 21, 2012
* MR. MAGOO'S CHRISTMAS CAROL. 8 p.m. Saturday, NBC 10. I USED TO BE a little embarrassed that my favorite Scrooge was Mister Magoo. The adult choice, I knew, was Alastair Sim, the Scottish actor whose 1951 portrayal of Ebenezer Scrooge from Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" is considered the gold standard for holiday-movie misers. Sim, who has one of the more entertaining entries on Wikipedia - really, you should check it out - is probably a worthier candidate than, say, Bill Murray, a fascinating actor whose "Scrooged" wasn't exactly one for the ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2009 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
The Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion will host its annual Dickens Christmas Party on Saturday afternoon, featuring a taste of Victorian hospitality. From 2 to 4:30 p.m., families can participate in a tradition of Victorian holidays, enjoying cookies and Christmas punch in the mansion's dining room. Actors portraying novelists Charles Dickens and Louisa May Alcott will read from the works of those authors. Children can buy items from the mansion gift shop, and an art teacher will help them wrap purchases and make holiday cards.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
Despite the glorious sunshine and temperatures that neared 60 degrees, it felt very much like Christmas in Medford Township on Saturday afternoon at the town Christmas festival. Even with Ebenezer Scrooge spewing "Bah, humbug" all over Main Street, the spirit of the holiday prevailed. Sponsored by the Historic Medford Village Business Association to help kick off the Christmas season, the festival attracted scores of Medford residents and others, who strolled, sang and were entertained by musicians and a host of characters from the pages of Charles Dickens.
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NEWS
December 25, 2012
By Dolores Lehr Charles Dickens has always been popular in Philadelphia. The city has its statue of this famous Victorian author where the Friends of Clark Park gather each February to celebrate his birthday. The "Dickens Village" at Macy's, moved from its former location in Strawbridge's, attracts large crowds of visitors every year during the Christmas holidays. The Philadelphia Free Library is concluding its yearlong celebration of the Dickens' Bicentenary (1812-2012), which has included monthly discussions of Dickens' works, displays of his letters and artifacts, and other festive events.
NEWS
December 21, 2012
* MR. MAGOO'S CHRISTMAS CAROL. 8 p.m. Saturday, NBC 10. I USED TO BE a little embarrassed that my favorite Scrooge was Mister Magoo. The adult choice, I knew, was Alastair Sim, the Scottish actor whose 1951 portrayal of Ebenezer Scrooge from Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" is considered the gold standard for holiday-movie misers. Sim, who has one of the more entertaining entries on Wikipedia - really, you should check it out - is probably a worthier candidate than, say, Bill Murray, a fascinating actor whose "Scrooged" wasn't exactly one for the ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2011
"It was Christmas Day in the workhouse, that season of good cheer, the paupers' hearts were merry, their bellies full of beer. "   - An old English bawdy NOT TO BE overly optimistic as we head into the homestretch of the holiday season, but if President Newt Gingrich is going to send us paupers back to the workhouses, I'm hoping we get beer on Christmas Day. A meager pint of ale on the holiday, after...
NEWS
December 6, 2011
JUST IN TIME for Christmas, hardworking taxpayers Bob Cratchit and his family (the downtrodden American public) will be wondering what decisions Jacob Marley and Ebenezer Scrooge (Sen. Mitch McConnell and Rep. John Boehner) will be making about their economic futures. It will be interesting to watch how this modern-day Christmas story plays out. Will they side with the Cratchit family and Tiny Tim and raise taxes on themselves and banker Henry A. Potter (Wall Street CEOs)? Or, will they continue to require that banker Potter continue his Wonderful Life with his historic-low taxation entitlement?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2009 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
The Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion will host its annual Dickens Christmas Party on Saturday afternoon, featuring a taste of Victorian hospitality. From 2 to 4:30 p.m., families can participate in a tradition of Victorian holidays, enjoying cookies and Christmas punch in the mansion's dining room. Actors portraying novelists Charles Dickens and Louisa May Alcott will read from the works of those authors. Children can buy items from the mansion gift shop, and an art teacher will help them wrap purchases and make holiday cards.
NEWS
December 24, 2007 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once upon a time at Christmas, Philadelphia families mobbed Market Street, drawn by the animated window displays at Gimbels, the Enchanted Village at Lit Bros., and the monorail at Wanamakers. And at Strawbridge & Clothier, they would have waited forever to see the Dickens Christmas Village, a replica of 1843 London with intricate scenes retelling the story of Ebenezer Scrooge and his eventual awakening to the spirit of generosity. Most of the downtown department stores are gone now and with them much of the glitter that was Christmas past.
NEWS
December 17, 2006 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's nothing warm and fuzzy about A Camden Christmas Carol, the multimedia production that opened last night at the Walter K. Gordon Theater on the campus of Rutgers University-Camden. "The cartoon sense we've gotten of Scrooge is wrong," said Jean-Ronald LaFond, who plays the character created by Charles Dickens in A Christmas Carol.In Dickens' classic story, Ebenezer Scrooge is a cruel, bitter, miserly man who, through visits from three spirits - Christmases past, present and future - is transformed into a compassionate keeper of the true meaning of the holiday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Just when you think you've reached your lifetime quota of Christmas Carols, along comes a genuinely original production. There are, currently, at least four professional productions of stage adaptations of Charles Dickens' famous story on the boards locally (and who knows how many others lurking in high school auditoriums and community theaters), plus the inevitable TV screenings of the movie versions. But the Christmas Carol at Mum Puppettheatre is a two-man, many-puppet show. Of course, it's still the same old story, of tightwad taskmaster Ebenezer Scrooge and the visits by three ghosts, as the cosmos stages some last-ditch attempt to save him from his own inhumanity.
NEWS
November 21, 2006 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
This time of year, productions of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol stud the landscape like hunks of candied orange peel on a fruitcake. Much like the ubiquitous holiday dessert, those productions often end up sodden relics of a tradition that began with the best of intentions but became dreaded byproducts of seasonal tyranny. In Bristol Riverside Theatre's production of The Trial of Ebenezer Scrooge, Scrooge has reverted to his holiday-hating self, and the three ghosts, plus Scrooge's former business partner, Jacob Marley, are now on trial for kidnapping, breaking and entering, and other offenses related to that fateful night exactly one year earlier, when Scrooge discovered his Christmas spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2004 | By Angela Valdez FOR THE INQUIRER
The family's in Poughkeepsie and you can't make it home, but that's no reason to spend Dec. 25 on the couch with HBO. Whether you're by yourself or making do with a few friends, the region offers plenty of cheer for lonely souls. Here are some ideas to liven up a solitary Christmas Day. 'Scrooge' This musical interpretation of Dickens' Christmas chestnut injects a dose of comedy into the well-known cautionary tale against cheapskates and humbugs. The archetypal curmudgeon, Ebenezer Scrooge, is played by Thorn Birds heartthrob Richard Chamberlain.
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