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Ebola

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NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IT'S GOING VIRAL. Ebola? No . . . at least not here in the United States, where the deadly virus has not spread among the general population. Although Ebola has been - and remains - a major, lethal public-health crisis in West Africa, cases in the U.S. have been limited to the death of a man who contracted the illness in Liberia before returning to Dallas, and now the infection of two hospital workers who treated him. What is going viral, however, is fear itself - what Franklin Roosevelt might have called "nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
A LACK OF protection from Ebola won't fly for subcontracted airport workers. Employees trying to unionize as well as representatives from SEIU, a labor union that represents more than 1.9 million workers in the U.S. and Canada, gathered at Philadelphia International Airport yesterday to voice concerns about potential exposure to the virus. "We need to replace fear with facts," said Councilman Curtis Jones Jr., who spoke at the event. "This virus doesn't know hierarchy. It doesn't know the CEO from the person doing the cabins in the airplane.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As even the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has acknowledged, Ebola is scary. The deadliness of the virus and its sometimes gruesome symptoms helped make it a focus of news reports and Hollywood treatments decades before the current outbreak, even as actual cases remained relatively limited and remote. Now that the contagion has killed nearly 4,000 West Africans and, in a few cases, reached across the globe, the dread surrounding it has gone from theoretical to actual for much more of the world.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
A DAY after City Council held a four-hour hearing on Ebola, Mayor Nutter and his top safety officials briefed members of the press yesterday on the city's preparedness, in the unlikely event that cases of Ebola appear in Philadelphia. Nutter said the city is prepared to handle infectious diseases, just as it has been in the past when there were concerns over Anthrax, H1N1 and SARS. He said that although the risk of contracting Ebola is still very low, using an abundance of caution is a matter of good faith.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
KAMPALA, Uganda - The deadly Ebola virus has killed 14 people in western Uganda this month, Ugandan health officials said Saturday, ending weeks of speculation about the cause of a strange disease that had many people fleeing their homes. The officials and a World Health Organization representative told a news conference in Kampala on Saturday that there was "an outbreak of Ebola" in Uganda. "Laboratory investigations done at the Uganda Virus Research Institute . . . have confirmed that the strange disease reported in Kibaale is indeed Ebola hemorrhagic fever," the Ugandan government and WHO said in a joint statement.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE EBOLA crisis and scare have hit Welleh Taire, a Liberian immigrant who lives in Southwest Philadelphia. Two of her cousins in Monrovia, Liberia's capital, died in August. Her 10-year-old daughter has not yet been allowed to travel here from Liberia. And people have asked her if she has Ebola just because she's from Africa. "Three weeks ago, I was at work and this woman asked me, 'Do you have Ebola?' " Taire said yesterday. "I said, 'What made you think I have Ebola?' I tried to explain to her not all Africans have Ebola.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Police briefly quarantined a house in South Philadelphia on Thursday morning after a woman who had recently returned from central Africa was suffering abdominal pain, high fever, and aching joints, law enforcement sources said. Despite initial concerns that the woman could be suffering from Ebola, doctors and the city Department of Public Health quickly determined she was not infected with the virus, which has claimed thousands of lives in West Africa. Health Department spokesman Jeff Moran said "rumors of a suspected Ebola case in South Philadelphia" were reviewed by the department's Division of Disease Control - and emergency services physicians.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A passenger on a US Airways flight Wednesday from Philadelphia to the Dominican Republic was greeted by agents in hazmat suits after he allegedly made a joke about Ebola. A video uploaded on YouTube by a passenger shows at least four people in blue hazmat suits boarding the flight, which had landed in Punta Cana, and eventually escorting the unidentified man off the plane. The airline issued the following statement: "US Airways Flight 845 from Philadelphia to Punta Cana was met yesterday by local officials upon landing due to a possible health issue on board.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I will never forget the first time I walked into an Ebola isolation ward at Connaught Hospital in Freetown, Sierra Leone," Dan Kelly writes in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature. "It was 20 August," continues Kelly, who grew up in Valley Forge, and graduated from Malvern Preparatory School and Princeton University before heading to medical school and founding a clinic in Sierra Leone eight years ago - long before Ebola spread fear and death through one of the poorest countries in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Gloucester Township woman who had traveled to West Africa this month to visit relatives remained hospitalized Wednesday with malaria, officials said. For a brief period, until lab tests confirmed she had malaria, the woman - who was being monitored because of her travels - was treated as a patient potentially with the highly contagious Ebola. The 38-year-old woman called authorities Tuesday evening to report she had a high fever, a symptom of both malaria and Ebola, said Claudia Funaro, director of nursing for the Camden County Department of Health and Human Services.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
A Johnson & Johnson diagnostic test that can detect the Ebola virus has been authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for emergency use when there is a suspected outbreak. The test, developed by J&J subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceutica and partner Biocartis NV in Belgium, detects the Ebola strain that caused more than 11,000 deaths in West Africa in 2014. Using only a few drops of blood, the test can distinguish Ebola from other fevers, such as malaria, in 100 minutes, said Janssen medical director Theresa Pattery.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
Haven't explored the new world of virtual-reality goggles and software? Golly, what are you waiting for? Once the stuff of fantasy, replacing what you see and hear from all sides with a 360-degree virtual world, VR is finally making inroads. Totally immersive and seductive when done right, VR is gaining backing from major media and tech firms, and now seems poised to change our perception of everything from news to entertainment, shopping to travel, education to medical care.
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
NONE OF us had any business being inside City Council chambers Monday. Not the politicians seeking a strategy to reduce gun violence, sincere as they are. Not the directors of this program or the president of that program, who inevitably said they needed more money to do what they do. Some do. Others need a good, hard look at their results before anyone forks over any more money. Not the cynical reporters - speaking mostly of myself - who sat through a marathon hearing on youth gun violence, jotting down the same old catchphrases about partnerships and programs and resources and services - and if anyone was feeling especially brave, the "epidemic" of violence.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Paul Farmer, a renowned pioneer of global health care, brought his message about the importance of caring for the world's poor to the University of Pennsylvania this week. Farmer said academic medical centers like Penn can make a huge difference by bringing their model of combining research, training, and hands-on care to places where people lack even basic medical supplies. A Harvard Medical School professor, Farmer has used that approach successfully at the organization he helped found, Partners in Health.
NEWS
January 23, 2016
HUNGARY Holocaust-denier receives probation A Budapest court on Thursday sentenced a Hungarian man to three years' probation for publicly denying that the Holocaust happened. The case stems from a 2012 speech in which Ferenc Oroshazi read excerpts from Fatelessness , a semiautobiographical novel by Hungarian Holocaust survivor and Nobel Prize-winning author Imre Kertesz, and said they proved that the Holocaust didn't happen. Fatelessness narrates the experiences of a 14-year-old boy, Gyuri Koves, in the Auschwitz and Buchenwald death camps.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
As a longtime nurse, Mary Lou Manning has seen some horrific infectious diseases, from AIDS to anthrax to Ebola. But Manning, who has published more than 35 articles on infectious diseases, focuses more on how to prevent the spread of infection in the first place. Manning's work as an ambassador for global infection prevention has taken her to numerous countries. In 2007, she joined a post-tsunami recovery team in Indonesia. During the recent Ebola crisis, Manning was on the faculty of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention safety training program for health-care workers going to West Africa.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Gloucester Township woman who had traveled to West Africa this month to visit relatives remained hospitalized Wednesday with malaria, officials said. For a brief period, until lab tests confirmed she had malaria, the woman - who was being monitored because of her travels - was treated as a patient potentially with the highly contagious Ebola. The 38-year-old woman called authorities Tuesday evening to report she had a high fever, a symptom of both malaria and Ebola, said Claudia Funaro, director of nursing for the Camden County Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every morning, first thing, Mary Moore Kieh searches Craigslist for old EKG and X-ray machines. Maybe one day she'll get lucky and find an operating room light. Kieh, 49, a nurse at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby, is building a clinic in her native Liberia. She knows she cannot save the world. But she may save some people who come to her clinic. And maybe they can help others. And perhaps just by trying, she will inspire others to make more of their own lives, to have hope, even a dream.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trish Henwood, the University of Pennsylvania emergency-room physician who twice went to Liberia to fight Ebola, says global intervention - albeit too late - still saved hundreds of thousands of lives. She also says the frantic reaction here showed U.S. leaders that improving health systems in fragile African nations is in our national security interest. Henwood, who gave Penn's annual Global Distinguished Lecture on Tuesday evening, told a rapt audience that fear too often trumped science and "definitely hampered the response . . . and led to more panic than preparedness.
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