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Ebola

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NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IT'S GOING VIRAL. Ebola? No . . . at least not here in the United States, where the deadly virus has not spread among the general population. Although Ebola has been - and remains - a major, lethal public-health crisis in West Africa, cases in the U.S. have been limited to the death of a man who contracted the illness in Liberia before returning to Dallas, and now the infection of two hospital workers who treated him. What is going viral, however, is fear itself - what Franklin Roosevelt might have called "nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As even the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has acknowledged, Ebola is scary. The deadliness of the virus and its sometimes gruesome symptoms helped make it a focus of news reports and Hollywood treatments decades before the current outbreak, even as actual cases remained relatively limited and remote. Now that the contagion has killed nearly 4,000 West Africans and, in a few cases, reached across the globe, the dread surrounding it has gone from theoretical to actual for much more of the world.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
A LACK OF protection from Ebola won't fly for subcontracted airport workers. Employees trying to unionize as well as representatives from SEIU, a labor union that represents more than 1.9 million workers in the U.S. and Canada, gathered at Philadelphia International Airport yesterday to voice concerns about potential exposure to the virus. "We need to replace fear with facts," said Councilman Curtis Jones Jr., who spoke at the event. "This virus doesn't know hierarchy. It doesn't know the CEO from the person doing the cabins in the airplane.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
A DAY after City Council held a four-hour hearing on Ebola, Mayor Nutter and his top safety officials briefed members of the press yesterday on the city's preparedness, in the unlikely event that cases of Ebola appear in Philadelphia. Nutter said the city is prepared to handle infectious diseases, just as it has been in the past when there were concerns over Anthrax, H1N1 and SARS. He said that although the risk of contracting Ebola is still very low, using an abundance of caution is a matter of good faith.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
KAMPALA, Uganda - The deadly Ebola virus has killed 14 people in western Uganda this month, Ugandan health officials said Saturday, ending weeks of speculation about the cause of a strange disease that had many people fleeing their homes. The officials and a World Health Organization representative told a news conference in Kampala on Saturday that there was "an outbreak of Ebola" in Uganda. "Laboratory investigations done at the Uganda Virus Research Institute . . . have confirmed that the strange disease reported in Kibaale is indeed Ebola hemorrhagic fever," the Ugandan government and WHO said in a joint statement.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE EBOLA crisis and scare have hit Welleh Taire, a Liberian immigrant who lives in Southwest Philadelphia. Two of her cousins in Monrovia, Liberia's capital, died in August. Her 10-year-old daughter has not yet been allowed to travel here from Liberia. And people have asked her if she has Ebola just because she's from Africa. "Three weeks ago, I was at work and this woman asked me, 'Do you have Ebola?' " Taire said yesterday. "I said, 'What made you think I have Ebola?' I tried to explain to her not all Africans have Ebola.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Gloucester Township woman who had traveled to West Africa this month to visit relatives remained hospitalized Wednesday with malaria, officials said. For a brief period, until lab tests confirmed she had malaria, the woman - who was being monitored because of her travels - was treated as a patient potentially with the highly contagious Ebola. The 38-year-old woman called authorities Tuesday evening to report she had a high fever, a symptom of both malaria and Ebola, said Claudia Funaro, director of nursing for the Camden County Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Police briefly quarantined a house in South Philadelphia on Thursday morning after a woman who had recently returned from central Africa was suffering abdominal pain, high fever, and aching joints, law enforcement sources said. Despite initial concerns that the woman could be suffering from Ebola, doctors and the city Department of Public Health quickly determined she was not infected with the virus, which has claimed thousands of lives in West Africa. Health Department spokesman Jeff Moran said "rumors of a suspected Ebola case in South Philadelphia" were reviewed by the department's Division of Disease Control - and emergency services physicians.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I will never forget the first time I walked into an Ebola isolation ward at Connaught Hospital in Freetown, Sierra Leone," Dan Kelly writes in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature. "It was 20 August," continues Kelly, who grew up in Valley Forge, and graduated from Malvern Preparatory School and Princeton University before heading to medical school and founding a clinic in Sierra Leone eight years ago - long before Ebola spread fear and death through one of the poorest countries in the world.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A passenger on a US Airways flight Wednesday from Philadelphia to the Dominican Republic was greeted by agents in hazmat suits after he allegedly made a joke about Ebola. A video uploaded on YouTube by a passenger shows at least four people in blue hazmat suits boarding the flight, which had landed in Punta Cana, and eventually escorting the unidentified man off the plane. The airline issued the following statement: "US Airways Flight 845 from Philadelphia to Punta Cana was met yesterday by local officials upon landing due to a possible health issue on board.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Gloucester Township woman who had traveled to West Africa this month to visit relatives remained hospitalized Wednesday with malaria, officials said. For a brief period, until lab tests confirmed she had malaria, the woman - who was being monitored because of her travels - was treated as a patient potentially with the highly contagious Ebola. The 38-year-old woman called authorities Tuesday evening to report she had a high fever, a symptom of both malaria and Ebola, said Claudia Funaro, director of nursing for the Camden County Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every morning, first thing, Mary Moore Kieh searches Craigslist for old EKG and X-ray machines. Maybe one day she'll get lucky and find an operating room light. Kieh, 49, a nurse at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby, is building a clinic in her native Liberia. She knows she cannot save the world. But she may save some people who come to her clinic. And maybe they can help others. And perhaps just by trying, she will inspire others to make more of their own lives, to have hope, even a dream.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trish Henwood, the University of Pennsylvania emergency-room physician who twice went to Liberia to fight Ebola, says global intervention - albeit too late - still saved hundreds of thousands of lives. She also says the frantic reaction here showed U.S. leaders that improving health systems in fragile African nations is in our national security interest. Henwood, who gave Penn's annual Global Distinguished Lecture on Tuesday evening, told a rapt audience that fear too often trumped science and "definitely hampered the response . . . and led to more panic than preparedness.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson, which has operations in the Philadelphia region, said it has formed a consortium to boost the drugmaker's efforts to quickly develop an Ebola vaccine, and the European-based Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) plans to award $115.8 million (100 million Euros) to help the project. IMI is a public-private initiative whose goal is to speed up the development of better and safer medicines. Besides J&J's Janssen Pharmaceutical division, the consortium includes the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM)
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Google calls it "The Year in Search 2014" - a snapshot of what people went looking for throughout the year. The list used to be called the "Google Zeitgeist," but that name evidently was too self-congratulatory for even this self-congratulatory search-engine giant. Still, it says a little about human beings and what interests them. Just maybe, it says a lot. Remember that, worldwide, the Internet/Web is a minority pursuit. Despite the withering hailstorm of overwrought self-promotion, only about 40 percent of humanity has access.
NEWS
January 3, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trish Henwood is home from Liberia, where she spent five weeks working in an Ebola treatment unit, but on Monday the University of Pennsylvania emergency department physician is going back. Henwood, 34, director of global initiatives for the emergency department of Penn's health system, called the experience the most profound of her life. She said she declared more people dead - probably 40 - than she ever had or likely ever will in an American emergency room. The dying children ripped her apart the most.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
TWO CITY HOSPITALS have been tapped to help treat Ebola patients who land on American soil. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania are two of 35 hospitals throughout the country chosen to house Ebola treatment centers, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced yesterday. CHOP and HUP were selected by a panel of local, state and federal officials for inclusion in the program, which bolsters the three national treatment facilities at Emory University Hospital, Nebraska Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health, according to the CDC. "We were among the first in the nation to offer our special expertise in this global crisis, and we welcome the . . . confidence in our abilities," said Susan Phillips, Penn Medicine's senior vice president for public affairs.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have been named Ebola treatment centers by state health officials, the Department of Health and Human Services announced Tuesday. The two hospitals are among 35 designated to treat Ebola in 12 states and the District of Columbia, and are the only two in Pennsylvania. Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick was also identified as a treatment center, the only hospital named in New Jersey.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Mel Kohn is at the intersection of the governmental, nonprofit, and corporate efforts directed at the Ebola crisis in West Africa. Kohn, who lives in Philadelphia, works for Merck & Co. in West Point, Montgomery County. He joined Merck Vaccines after 14 years of work in public health for the State of Oregon. With the drugmaker's office of corporate philanthropy funding the trip, he and Merck colleague John Grabenstein visited Sierra Leone in October as part of a group put together by the Virginia-based nonprofit Project HOPE and invited by the Sierra Leone government.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Itching to compete and join the fight to solve one of the world's most talked-about health concerns, Merck & Co. got back in the business of making Ebola vaccine Monday. The pharmaceutical giant announced that it will pay at least $30 million to license a potential drug from a small, Iowa-based company called NewLink Genetics Corp. NewLink will get a second payment of $20 million once the next phase of clinical trials starts, which might be in the first months of 2015 - a sign of the accelerated process.
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