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Echelon Mall

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NEWS
November 23, 2004 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Voorhees Township Committee unanimously approved a redevelopment plan for the ailing Echelon Mall last night, paving the way for a revitalization that is expected to include a Wal-Mart by 2006. The plan - contained in an ordinance - provides development guidelines, focusing on building setbacks, parking and landscaping. The Wal-Mart would join Boscov's and Strawbridge's, the current anchor tenants. "I am excited about it because it opens up the door for a lot of things to happen there," Mayor Harry Platt said.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
Tom Ford picked his way through bins stacked with fresh melons, potatoes, tomatoes, onions, apples and peaches. Nearby, a glass-enclosed freezer offered a bountiful selection of fresh salmon, shrimp and flounder. In another corner stood an Italian deli. After a few minutes of scrutiny, Ford stuffed his plastic bag full of celery, lettuce and deli meats. Ford, a Berlin Borough resident, was one of a few dozen customers who arrived at the Echelon Mall in Voorhees on Saturday morning to sample its newest addition, a farmer's market, in the south plaza of the mall just outside the Food Court entrance and adjacent to the movie theaters.
NEWS
May 25, 2004 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ailing Echelon Mall could soon be home to a major big-box retailer or two, according to its owner, the Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust. PREIT wants to demolish 210,000 square feet of retail space, including the vacant 170,000-square-foot J.C. Penney store, to try to lure a specialty big-box retailer that could custom design its store, Voorhees Mayor Harry Platt said. "PREIT has informed us that it's their intention to tear down the Penneys and look to build one or two big boxes in the parking-lot areas," Platt said yesterday.
NEWS
September 12, 1997 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Before long, the Echelon Mall billboards will have to changed to boast of 161 stores "to the rescue," instead of 160. That's because Sears, Roebuck & Co. is planning to add a 140,000-square-foot store to the Laurel Road side of the mall - making Echelon one of the largest in South Jersey. The Planning Board unanimously approved the project Wednesday night after the developer, the Rouse Co., satisfied the board's questions about traffic and parking. "They did a good job of making the board members happy and addressing our concerns," said Planning Board member Gary Finger.
NEWS
July 15, 2004 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ailing Echelon Mall in Voorhees will soon get a major boost with retail powerhouse Wal-Mart moving into space left by a former J.C. Penney store. The planned 147,550-square-foot Wal-Mart store is expected to open in 2006, a company spokeswoman said. It will join Boscov's and Strawbridge's as anchor tenants. The plan is for a free-standing Wal-Mart to be built in the former Penney's parking lot. Getting Wal-Mart's commitment represents the first step in a major redevelopment of the troubled mall, said Joseph Coradino, vice president of retail for Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT)
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | By Alison F. Orenstein, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For years when Donna Willis tried to persuade developers to open youth centers in shopping malls, she got one answer: "We'll be the second, but not the first. " So to sell the idea, Willis, a businesswoman in Phoenix, searched the country for one such center she could point to as an example. In July 1991, that search led her to Kathy Urban at Junction 14 in the Echelon Mall in Voorhees. Urban has been sucessfully operating Junction 14 (that's fourteen as in for teen) in a room donated by the mall's developer in June 1990.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the survival-of-the-fittest, cutthroat world of retail, some malls have the right stuff. Others simply need to be "right-sized" and reincarnated - like, say, neighborhood mall, meets City Hall, meets Main Street. Take the old Echelon Mall. Known as "The Mall" in its heyday in the late 1970s and '80s, it drew from surrounding communities, like Lindenwold, Clementon, and Audubon. But time, disrepair, an exodus of tenants, and newer competition took their toll. By the time mall powerhouse Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT)
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tucked away in the small western corner of this township, you'll find Echelon Cab Co., Echelon Chiropractic Center, Echelon Hair Styling Salon and Echelon Driving School. Around the corner, you might bump into the Echelon Tower Apartments, Echelon Skating Center or - right in the center of it all - the Echelon Mall. The only thing you won't find in the area is Echelon. It's not on any maps. It's not on any street signs. That's the point Voorhees officials are making as they launch their second campaign in three years to change the name of the Echelon Mall to Voorhees Mall.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1992 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 1980s, when shopping at the mall was an important form of entertainment in itself, are definitely gone. In the 1990s, malls increasingly use elaborate entertainment to lure reluctant or distracted consumers in to shop. This weekend will bring the debut of the nation's first Exhilarama, one of a planned chain of family entertainment centers scheduled for malls throughout the country. Exhilarama at Echelon Mall in Voorhees plans to open to the public tomorrow evening, barring any last-minute glitches.
NEWS
September 10, 2003 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Throughout its 43-year history, the Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust has had a reputation for turning troubled properties into moneymakers. So in acquiring the Echelon Mall in Voorhees from the Rouse Co. in March - along with the Cherry Hill, Moorestown, Exton Square and Plymouth Meeting Malls and Center City's Gallery at Market East - the trust saw another chance to do what it does best. "We really see Echelon as an opportunity," said Joseph F. Coradino, executive vice president for retail operations of the Philadelphia-based trust, known as PREIT.
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NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before M. Allan Vogelson became a judge in 1995, he sometimes dined in Atlantic City in the early 1980s with Pete Rose, who was the Phillies' first baseman from 1979 to 1983. They shared the table with Carol Woliung, who in 1984 would become Rose's second wife. They were dining at the Playboy Hotel & Casino because Woliung was a Bunny waitress there. And because Vogelson's wife, Sandra, was, as she wrote in her resumé, " 'Bunny Mother,' the executive in charge of over 400 Playboy cocktail and dealer Bunnies.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust has been renovating shopping malls, selling less-successful properties, and paying down its debt since the last recession. But it's not moving fast enough for one activist shareholder. Connecticut-based Jonathan Litt, whose Land & Buildings investment fund owns about $10 million of PREIT stock - a little less than 1 percent - posted an open letter Monday urging the Philadelphia-based company to sell half its malls, including a handful in this region.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the survival-of-the-fittest, cutthroat world of retail, some malls have the right stuff. Others simply need to be "right-sized" and reincarnated - like, say, neighborhood mall, meets City Hall, meets Main Street. Take the old Echelon Mall. Known as "The Mall" in its heyday in the late 1970s and '80s, it drew from surrounding communities, like Lindenwold, Clementon, and Audubon. But time, disrepair, an exodus of tenants, and newer competition took their toll. By the time mall powerhouse Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT)
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
As commander of the community relations division of the Philadelphia Police Department in the early 1980s, E. Robert Korn enjoyed not only dealing with law-abiding citizens, but also at times being a face of the city, his son Warren said. "He got to travel on behalf of the city as a representative of the Police Department," his son said. One of Mr. Korn's favorite memories was briefing crew members of the aircraft carrier Saratoga at its port near Jacksonville, Fla., in the early 1980s, before joining them on the voyage to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for the Saratoga's extensive repairs.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A $200 million splurge on Cherry Hill Mall during the depths of the last recession, when cash was poured into a full-blown renovation while many Americans were clinging to every last dime, appears to be paying off four years later, according to financial disclosures Tuesday by its owner, Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust. Sales per square foot at the mall reached an all-time high of $623 during the quarter that ended March 31, executives of Center City-based PREIT told investors, and a plan to refinance the property this summer could generate yet another payday for the crown retail jewel of Ronald Rubin's real estate empire by helping to pay down $2.3 billion in debt.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An expansion and redevelopment project is ahead for King of Prussia Mall, with officials announcing Tuesday plans to demolish the old John Wanamaker department store at the complex in order to make way for 10 new retail stores. The Wanamaker store at the Plaza, which was transformed for a short time into a Strawbridge's before it was decommissioned some time ago, will become the site of a two-story, 122,790-square-foot new building, officials said. It is the first major redevelopment at the East Coast's largest shopping mall since 2001, when construction crews redeveloped another old Strawbridge and Clothier store into the Pavilion.
NEWS
May 28, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Except for the piped-in music, the Voorhees mall was nearly silent shortly before lunchtime this week. At a perfume kiosk, a young man wondered whether he would sell more than a bottle or two that day. Seniors crowded together over coffee and Danish at tables in the mostly empty food court. "I like it here. It's nice and peaceful. There's none of the riffraff," said Connie Sparks, who was dining with a friend. Once one of South Jersey's most visited indoor shopping centers, the former Echelon Mall - now called Voorhees Town Center - fell on hard times in the 1990s.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County, in a cost-cutting move, has shut two of its three passport and government-services centers. Opened in the late 1990s during a period of government expansion, the "county stores" were designed to provide residents easy access to services, including passport renewal and help writing a will. Mall centers allow residents of the county's suburbs to save a trip to the clerk's office in downtown Camden. But the location in the Cherry Hill Mall cost the county more than $230,000 a year.
NEWS
February 28, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gerald McFadden, 79, of Lansdale, a retired director of distribution for Acme Markets, died of heart failure Friday, Feb. 25, at home. Mr. McFadden was born in County Donegal, Ireland. One of 13 children, he left home at 14 to work in Dublin. Later, he worked on BBC sets in London before immigrating to the United States in 1953. From 1954 to 1956, he served in the U.S. Army. While stationed in Germany, he returned to Ireland to see his sister Agnes profess her vows as a nun. He earned his American citizenship in the military.
NEWS
November 16, 2008 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From one end, the former Echelon Mall in Voorhees looks much as it always did: anchor stores Macy's and Boscov's floating in a sea of parking spaces. But on the other side, a village is rising where Sears and J.C. Penney once reigned. Following a national mall-makeover trend, the Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT) of Philadelphia is redeveloping the ailing Echelon into Voorhees Town Center, a mixture of housing, shops and offices. "Echelon Mall was too big and outdated," said Marc Policarpo, senior vice president at commercial real estate company Binswanger and a South Jersey Chamber of Commerce board member.
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