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NEWS
September 16, 2000
The echo boom (those born from 1977 to 1997) is 80 million people strong, the largest generation ever. Well informed and media-savvy, echo boomers display a strong work ethic and have grown up understanding the new digital economy.. . . More than any previous generation, they are becoming conversant with a communications revolution transforming business, education, health care, entertainment [and] government . . . Surveys show them to be strong advocates for social responsibility.. . . These young people have $150 billion in direct purchasing power today, and about $500 billion in indirect purchasing power.
NEWS
December 30, 1999 | By Tahneer Oksman
you're carelessly turn ripping open calendars like a box of cracker jacks i say turn "it's not the end of the millennium there's one year to go" you turn say, "do you claim you were born on the year of your first birthday?" turn to let november turn december turn the weather's not paying attention and i am practicing 2000 in curly script we'll go to new york city turn new ball drop turn watching on the tv set turn too much traffic turn new years day december echo turn The author is a junior creative writing major at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 24, 2005 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
In the glory days of post-punk, Liverpool's smugly psychedelic Echo & the Bunnymen had it all. Lyricist Ian McCulloch cut mumbling monotone vocals with clarion yelps of ire, while guitarist Will Sergeant warmly sliced through the doomy ambience of catchy melodies. McCulloch and Sergeant, Echo's only two remaining original members, sold out the TLA on Tuesday, with younger accompanists to help out. At first, the two needed all the help they could get. McCullough's moaning through the jerky pulse and overly spacious arrangement of "Going Up" should have been triumphant.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
What becomes an '80s post-punk legend most? A graceful retirement, if Echo & the Bunnymen's arthritic Friday night performance at the TLA is any indication. The Bunnymen were in town to support their new record, What Are You Going to Do With Your Life? (Sire), which would have been more appropriately titled What Else Are You Going to Do With Your Life? Back in their mid-'80s glory days, Echo & the Bunnymen were a heady tangle of Goth and psychedelic sensibilities, a dynamic that wedded singer Ian McCulloch's Jim Morrison croon to the sound of Will Seargent's sleigh-bell guitars, reaching their stylistic apogee with 1984's Ocean Rain.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer
LONG AFTER HE'D sandbagged the doors to a bar that's been a second home for decades, Joe Rullo tried to sandbag Hurricane Sandy on Sunday with superstition, laughter and a cold beer. A $1 bill he'd placed on the cash register at Echo's, in North Wildwood, was the "Hurricane Dollar" that had helped thwart Hurricane Irene last year. Outside, in black and orange spray paint, Rullo had written Go Pound Sandy on the fresh plywood that covered the doors, alongside a makeshift jack-o'-lantern and ghost.
NEWS
July 19, 1999
Once again, we get a punch to the solar plexus. Once again, the gasping shock of unbelievable news - JFK Jr.'s plane lost in the ocean off Martha's Vineyard carrying John, his wife and her sister. All weekend, we maintained a now-familiar vigil: unable to stay away from the television, not wanting to miss any details, any facts. Suspended in a long unreality of waiting, whose sad highlights came as the detritus of three young lives began washing up on shore. A luggage tag. A prescription bottle.
NEWS
January 2, 1996 | For The Inquirer / BOB WILLIAMS
Three dogs walk Heather Tillette near Montgomery Avenue in Bryn Mawr. Taking advantage of the warmer weather yesterday to give their best friend some exercise are (from left) Kaya, Echo and Gothick. Today, they may find human companions reluctant to walk for long; rain is predicted.
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She was blind and emaciated when she was stranded three years ago on Long Island. But Echo quickly adapted to her new home at the New Jersey State Aquarium - and thrived. The only harp seal on exhibit in the country, she learned voice commands from the trainers and used her sensitive whiskers and memory to negotiate the pool. But this week, after delighting thousands of visitors over the past three years, Echo died of undetermined causes. Frank Steslow, curator of living collections at the aquarium, said the seal began exhibiting symptoms Wednesday night and was moved to a holding area for treatment.
NEWS
November 26, 2001 | By Daniel Webster FOR THE INQUIRER
The thin column of vibrating air that is the recorder's sole resource is sometimes mistaken for poverty of expressive breadth and recessive projection. Neither is true, of course, and Elissa Berardi, recorder soloist with Philomel, made the ensemble's weekend concerts a showcase of the recorder's wit and range, its theatricality and surprising depth. No surprise here, because Berardi, a founder of the baroque ensemble, has devoted 26 seasons to widening her audience's perceptions of an instrument with modest decibels, but a long history of musical exploration.
NEWS
April 27, 2010 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Ever since Jake Gyllenhaal pedaled his bicycle through the doomed, pre-apocalyptic wastes of suburbia to the portentous strains of "The Killing Moon" in 2001's Donnie Darko, Echo & the Bunnymen have been on the slow train back to relevance. Judging by the one-third empty house that greeted the band's performance at the Keswick Theatre Sunday night, the train has yet to arrive at the station, but you could hear it coming around the bend. Running down numbers from their largely excellent back catalog with moody elan and precision, Echo & the Bunnymen - these days reduced to singer Ian McCulloch and guitarist Will Sergeant, backed by hired guns - tickled the early '80s post-punk nostalgia bone of the mostly fortysomething faithful on hand.
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NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Echoing the sentiments of Presidents Obama and Clinton, who had spoken before her, U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch closed out the NAACP's national convention Wednesday with calls to reform America's justice system, proclaiming that "law enforcement can protect communities without breaking them. " In her 25-minute speech before hundreds at the Convention Center, Lynch praised the country's civil-rights accomplishments, citing among others her father's efforts in 1960s North Carolina, but described the need to press on and "root out the injustice that confines liberty.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia finance director Rob Dubow was a bit more politic than his boss, but his message on Tuesday was the same: the plans offered by the Democratic mayoral candidates to fund city schools just don't add up. "It is not like these are all horrible ideas," Dubow told a room of reporters. "It is they just don't get the district what it needs. " That was a more measured assessment than one offered last week by Mayor Nutter, who called the candidates' solutions to the school funding crisis "bogus.
SPORTS
March 28, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
DUNEDIN, Fla. - Aaron Nola made his first visit to the Phillies clubhouse in June. The righthander had just signed his first professional contract. He had turned 21 a week earlier. The first-round pick was a millionaire. Nola held a news conference and was introduced to Cole Hamels, who was the Phillies' highest-drafted pitcher in more than a decade until they selected Nola. "I think he was in shock," Hamels said. ". . . Like I was when I was in his situation. " The shock should have worn off a little when the pitchers meet again on Friday.
SPORTS
February 23, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - For the third consecutive afternoon, a highly paid veteran Phillies pitcher finished his conditioning work and took a seat behind a microphone in the Bright House Field cafeteria. Cole Hamels' remarks Saturday in his first news conference of the spring jibed with Cliff Lee's on Thursday and Jonathan Papelbon's on Friday. Each is a potential trade piece who could find himself pitching elsewhere in the near future. Hamels, the top starting pitcher on the trade market, could land the Phillies a return that expedites their rebuilding.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Is Puerto Rico the next Lehman Brothers? So asks one Chadds Ford money manager who sees parallels between Puerto Rico and the ill-fated brokerage firm Lehman, which went bankrupt at the height of the 2008 financial crisis. "It sounds a bit scary," says Jonathan D. Smith, chief investment officer of DT Investment Partners. "There was a lot of positive buzz after Puerto Rico's last bond-issue deal was so successful - as there was when [billionaire investor] George Soros took a stake in Lehman.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
GIVEN the stark, sad revelations at the end of "Philomena," you probably don't think of it as a sentimental picture. But next to "Ida," it's a Disney movie. And "Philomena," in a strange way, belongs next to "Ida. " They're oddly similar - religiously tinged road movies about a mismatched pair (one cynic, one believer) of travelers looking for the sordid truth buried under secret, shameful history. The title character here is a teen novitiate (Agata Trzebuchowska), an orphan raised in a Polish convent, about to take her vows when she learns that she has a living relative - an aunt in nearby Gdansk.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The gray Toyota Corolla that Abbie Hoffman drove in Mexico during his fugitive years still sits in upper Bucks County, parked on the old farm where he lived and took his own life 25 years ago. "I've been wondering what to do with it," Michael Waldron, Hoffman's former landlord and friend, said last week. "But I'm not sure who would take it. " They still remember Hoffman at the Apple Jack bar in Point Pleasant, where he once shot pool and flirted with women. "He was pretty rowdy," said a 64-year-old regular, who didn't want to give his name.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Christopher Durang has many fans, not least of whom granted his Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike a Tony Award for best play in 2013. A longtime resident of Bucks County, he's also a mainstay around these parts. Princeton's McCarter Theatre premiered the comedy in 2012, and with this production, Philadelphia Theatre Company continues its long association with him. At its best, Durang's satirical vision is sharp, merciless, and hilarious. At its worst, he aims low at easy targets.
NEWS
January 16, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it was time to give the benediction at Gov. Christie's State of the State address Tuesday, the Rev. Wayne Zschech could have been at his Haddonfield church. As soon as Christie concluded his highly anticipated, 46-minute speech to a packed Statehouse, the audience of lawmakers and dignitaries began chatting. Zschech, senior pastor at the Lutheran Church of Our Savior, said his congregation often responds in a similar manner after the closing hymn, packing up and preparing to leave.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Tarell Alvin McCraney has been scooping up grants, prizes, and residencies like jelly beans; he is young, black, and gay, and his trilogy, "The Brother/Sister Plays," gives voice to the voiceless. The Brothers Size , in a haunting production at Simpatico Theatre Project, is the middle play of the three. The setting is San Pere, La., and the time is the tantalizing "Distant Present. " The older of the Brothers Size is Ogun (Carlo Campbell), who owns a car repair shop; his exasperating younger brother Oshoosi (Akeem Davis)
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