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Economic Security

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NEWS
October 8, 1993 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a subtle but far-ranging rebuke to his fellow Democrat in the White House, Sen. Bill Bradley of New Jersey yesterday called for an "economic security platform" to protect Americans against the unprecedented transformations wrought by a post-Cold War world. The Clinton administration has not gone far enough, Bradley suggested in a speech, to quell the anxieties of mainly middle-class citizens who, he said, "are adrift on a gigantic river of economic transformation that carries away everything that resists the swirling currents of its mighty flow.
NEWS
June 19, 2001
Relentless military maneuvers on economically and ecologically devastated Vieques - without regard for the welfare of its inhabitants or the consent of Puerto Rico's government - have been an affront to most Puerto Ricans. . . . A consensus has formed around the recognition that commonwealth status [for Puerto Rico] is no longer appropriate . . . It is time to initiate a transition process to grant Puerto Rico its independence - an independence grounded in economic security, mutual respect and appreciation for the contributions that Puerto Rico and its people have given the United States during the long American century.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News wire service reports
GENEVA VEEP: TROOPS NOT PAWNS Vice President Quayle yesterday denied the U.S. would pull troops out of Europe if world trade talks fail because of differences over farm subsidies. "There is absolutely no linkage between the level of troops in Europe and the GATT negotiations," he told reporters, referring to the talks under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. "There is a linkage, if you will, between economic security and military security, and it is important that the economic security issue be addressed, especially in the post-Cold War era," Quayle said.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | By ROBERT J. SAMUELSON
A few weeks ago, the New York Times reported that the National Security Agency - one of our main spy shops - was considering more economic spying as a way of boosting U.S. global competitiveness. Precisely what could be learned isn't clear - other countries' trade strategies or industrial secrets might be targets. What is clear is that the spying, aside from antagonizing our allies, wouldn't much help our economy. Consider the Soviet Union. It has been stealing high-technology secrets from the West for years.
NEWS
November 9, 1992 | By Al Kamen, WASHINGTON POST Susan Bennett of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
President-elect Bill Clinton will convene an economic summit of business leaders and experts "very soon" in Little Rock to discuss economic policy and his proposal for a White House economic security council, his top transition advisers said yesterday. The economic summit, while "still very much in the planning stage," according to transition director Warren M. Christopher, is meant to signal Clinton's resolve to move quickly on economic policy and to reach out to reassure the business community, which traditionally has been wary of a Democrat in the White House.
NEWS
October 28, 2008 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Craig Williams has a difficult job ahead of him. Who? Exactly. Williams, a relatively unknown Republican candidate in the Seventh Congressional District race, is the first to acknowledge that his biggest challenge might be name recognition. The former federal prosecutor and Marine is running against U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak. Though Williams says he feels his "name ID" is a challenge, meeting voters is his solution. "When I meet people, I convince them, overwhelmingly," Williams said.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
In a week in which the high point of political discourse has been cutesy post-mortems of Murphy Brown's get-even-with-Dan season opener, a recent in- depth poll offers a sweeping view of what real women really think about their lives. Consider it a wake-up call from sitcom-based politics. The Women's Voices Poll and Policy Report was commissioned by the Ms. Foundation for Women and the Center for for Policy Alternatives. Through a series of focus groups and a national survey of 1400 women, the bi-partisan poll concluded what most women already know on a personal level: that their lives are marked by "change, stress and satisfaction," as they struggle to balance work and family.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | By Emily Hancock, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For much of 1995, House Republicans have threatened to do away with the Commerce Department as a symbol of their commitment to slash the federal bureaucracy. But those threats have been greeted skeptically in a city where even tiny bureaucracies almost always have found ways to survive. Now, the Republicans actually seem on the verge of doing the unthinkable - wiping out the Commerce Department and 6,000 jobs. House Republican leaders on Friday declared their support for language in a huge budget-cutting bill that would kill Commerce.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don't take your money woes out on teachers, State Sen. Vincent Hughes has told the Philadelphia School Reform Commission in no uncertain terms. In a sharply worded letter to SRC Chairman Pedro Ramos, Hughes (D., Phila.) expressed "deep concerns" over the Philadelphia School District's recent opening contract proposal to the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. The district has said it needs up to $180 million annually in givebacks from its unions, and recently called for teachers to agree to deep wage cuts, steep benefits contributions, and an end to seniority.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For George Bush, the defeat took root at the moment of victory. On March 6, 1991, the President stood before a joint session of Congress and a grateful nation. He was, that night, a man at the height of his powers. He was the victor in the Persian Gulf, the liberator of Kuwait, the man who had "punched Saddam Hussein's lights out," as he would put it later. His job approval rating stood at 89 percent in one poll, 86 percent in another. His re-election seemed a fait accompli.
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NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don't take your money woes out on teachers, State Sen. Vincent Hughes has told the Philadelphia School Reform Commission in no uncertain terms. In a sharply worded letter to SRC Chairman Pedro Ramos, Hughes (D., Phila.) expressed "deep concerns" over the Philadelphia School District's recent opening contract proposal to the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. The district has said it needs up to $180 million annually in givebacks from its unions, and recently called for teachers to agree to deep wage cuts, steep benefits contributions, and an end to seniority.
NEWS
October 28, 2008 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Craig Williams has a difficult job ahead of him. Who? Exactly. Williams, a relatively unknown Republican candidate in the Seventh Congressional District race, is the first to acknowledge that his biggest challenge might be name recognition. The former federal prosecutor and Marine is running against U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak. Though Williams says he feels his "name ID" is a challenge, meeting voters is his solution. "When I meet people, I convince them, overwhelmingly," Williams said.
NEWS
June 19, 2001
Relentless military maneuvers on economically and ecologically devastated Vieques - without regard for the welfare of its inhabitants or the consent of Puerto Rico's government - have been an affront to most Puerto Ricans. . . . A consensus has formed around the recognition that commonwealth status [for Puerto Rico] is no longer appropriate . . . It is time to initiate a transition process to grant Puerto Rico its independence - an independence grounded in economic security, mutual respect and appreciation for the contributions that Puerto Rico and its people have given the United States during the long American century.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The personal ads speak of Palestinians' anxiety about the future. "Girl from Bethlehem, 18, student, fair-skinned, green-eyed, seeks man from inside the green line," reads one recent advertisement, using an expression that means Israel proper as opposed to the West Bank or Gaza. In another, a man describing himself as a 26-year-old intellectual from Ramallah says he wants to marry a woman "from within the green line," and "age and religion are unimportant. " There has been a wave of such ads in Fosta, a Palestinian women's magazine.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | By Emily Hancock, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For much of 1995, House Republicans have threatened to do away with the Commerce Department as a symbol of their commitment to slash the federal bureaucracy. But those threats have been greeted skeptically in a city where even tiny bureaucracies almost always have found ways to survive. Now, the Republicans actually seem on the verge of doing the unthinkable - wiping out the Commerce Department and 6,000 jobs. House Republican leaders on Friday declared their support for language in a huge budget-cutting bill that would kill Commerce.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a subtle but far-ranging rebuke to his fellow Democrat in the White House, Sen. Bill Bradley of New Jersey yesterday called for an "economic security platform" to protect Americans against the unprecedented transformations wrought by a post-Cold War world. The Clinton administration has not gone far enough, Bradley suggested in a speech, to quell the anxieties of mainly middle-class citizens who, he said, "are adrift on a gigantic river of economic transformation that carries away everything that resists the swirling currents of its mighty flow.
NEWS
June 3, 1993 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A report on the well-being of Pennsylvania children shows some troubling trends, with more infants being born underweight, more teenagers giving birth and more children living in single-parent families, a child-advocacy group said yesterday. In its first study of the health and economic security of the state's 2.8 million children age 17 and younger, the advocates said both urban and rural areas had fared worse in the last decade in six of nine factors used to gauge a child's welfare.
NEWS
November 9, 1992 | By Al Kamen, WASHINGTON POST Susan Bennett of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
President-elect Bill Clinton will convene an economic summit of business leaders and experts "very soon" in Little Rock to discuss economic policy and his proposal for a White House economic security council, his top transition advisers said yesterday. The economic summit, while "still very much in the planning stage," according to transition director Warren M. Christopher, is meant to signal Clinton's resolve to move quickly on economic policy and to reach out to reassure the business community, which traditionally has been wary of a Democrat in the White House.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For George Bush, the defeat took root at the moment of victory. On March 6, 1991, the President stood before a joint session of Congress and a grateful nation. He was, that night, a man at the height of his powers. He was the victor in the Persian Gulf, the liberator of Kuwait, the man who had "punched Saddam Hussein's lights out," as he would put it later. His job approval rating stood at 89 percent in one poll, 86 percent in another. His re-election seemed a fait accompli.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
In a week in which the high point of political discourse has been cutesy post-mortems of Murphy Brown's get-even-with-Dan season opener, a recent in- depth poll offers a sweeping view of what real women really think about their lives. Consider it a wake-up call from sitcom-based politics. The Women's Voices Poll and Policy Report was commissioned by the Ms. Foundation for Women and the Center for for Policy Alternatives. Through a series of focus groups and a national survey of 1400 women, the bi-partisan poll concluded what most women already know on a personal level: that their lives are marked by "change, stress and satisfaction," as they struggle to balance work and family.
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