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September 23, 2011
Player             School           Class           Major Robert Church    Drexel             So.       Sport mngmt. Jeff Crosby          Cabrini             So.           Finance Chris Ficke          Villanova          Sr.       Accounting Travis Gregory       Haverford          Sr.        Economics Dillon Hamill       Haverford          Jr.
NEWS
July 25, 2005
IT IS AWFUL THAT terrorist attacks on London's subways caused the death of so many innocent victims. But it is also appalling, as Rob Thomas of the alternative-music band Matchbox Twenty stated during the Live 8 concert in Philadelphia "that more Africans die from preventable disease on a daily basis than twice the people who died during the infamous 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York. " However, unless a person is watching public television, tragedies in industrialized nations always garner more media attention than those in undeveloped nations.
NEWS
October 10, 1988 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Something Sen. Dan Quayle cheerfully said during the debate has lifted a heavy load of worry from my mind. It came after Sen. Lloyd Bentsen pointed out that under the Reagan administration, we have become the No. 1 debtor nation in the world. As Bentsen said: "They've (foreign nations) bought 10 percent of the manufacturing base of this country. They bought 20 percent of the banks. They own 46 percent of the commercial real estate in Los Angeles. They're buying America on the cheap.
FOOD
December 18, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Organic farming can yield "real and significant" environmental and health benefits, but the jury is still out on whether it pays farmers to adopt such a strategy, two analysts write. More research "designed to increase the profitability of alternative agriculture deserves serious consideration," according to Pierre R. Crosson and Janet Ekey Ostrov. Farmers "receive few of the environmental benefits of alternative agriculture because many of these, such as improved water quality, occur off the farm, or like improved wildlife habitat, cannot be captured in economic terms," they wrote in a newsletter of Resources for the Future, a Washington- based environmental policy research organization.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1990 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
A huge yellow banner with red and black words is erected against the edge of a sidewalk in Southwest Philadelphia, soliciting passing drivers to blow their horns for "Black Power. " Meanwhile, a handful of protesters passes out fliers or yells to passers- by, alerting them that the Wild Wild West hoagie shop at 52nd Street and Kingsessing Avenue "is closed. " The shop owner has obtained a court order to keep the protesters - most of whom are activists from outside the neighborhood - at arm's length, while some residents patronize the shop despite the demonstration.
NEWS
October 3, 2015
Backing Francis on economics Antony Davies and James R. Harrigan claim Pope Francis' views on capitalism and free-market economics are wrong ("Francis is the pope, but he's no economic expert," Sunday). His familiarity with economics "is predicated on fallacy and fantasy," Davies and Harrigan observe. Drawing on data from the Fraser Institute, they claim that people in free, unregulated economic markets "enjoy higher standards of living . . . and suffer less income and gender inequality.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook and Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writers
Lawrence R. Klein, 93, of Gladwyne, a University of Pennsylvania economics professor who won a Nobel Prize and was considered the father of modern economic forecasting, died Sunday, Oct. 20, of a heart ailment at his home. Dr. Klein, who observed both the Depression and the post-World War II boom, influenced many of the current generation of economic forecasters by developing models in the 1950s and 1960s. Many of the economic forecasts taken as commonplace today - such as the effect of interest rates on economic growth - exist because of Dr. Klein's innovations, say economists.
NEWS
October 27, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Freakonomics: odd word, two roots that don't belong to the same tree. The ?onomics part speaks of the august, dour study of economics. But freak speaks of - freaks and the freaky. The word says it all: Look closely at the reasons people do things, and what you find can be really - freaky. Coined by economist Steven D. Levitt and journalist Stephen J. Dubner, freakonomics is on many people's lips. Dubner appears at 12:30 p.m. today at the Free Library to talk about their new book, Superfreakonomics.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1988 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chances are their names won't sound familiar. But you will hear from them. Of that, they are sure. They are tomorrow's leaders, and at 16 and 17 years of age, they are facing the problems of today. "They are our future," said Lila Booth, a business consultant. "We are talking about posterity here. " On Friday, under the watchful eye of Booth, 42 youngsters, graduating from a program in which they learned about business from businesspeople, showed that they had also learned a lot about life.
NEWS
February 7, 2006
THE EDITORIAL board must have been out sick when economic fundamentals were taught in high school, or they would've learned that governmental control of salaries (minimum wage) is one of the main tenets of socialism. The board is free to pander to those who lack education or drive to make a decent living without state handouts disguised as progressive legislation. Employees are paid their worth as determined by the market. Those unhappy with their lot need to work to improve it. For advice and inspiration, they can turn to millions of us who earn a living wage without the benefits of state interference.
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NEWS
September 18, 2016 | By Al Haas, Staff Writer
As we stroll down the automotive midway, we encounter a particularly enticing tent. We are drawn inside by the magnetism of curiosity. After all, who could resist experiencing The Incredible Shrinking GMC Acadia? For years, the Acadia has been part of a triumvirate of General Motors full-size crossover SUVs built on the trusty Lambda platform. The others, the Chevy Traverse and Buick Enclave, will remain as full-sizers. But while the Acadia will continue to be offered in its full-size, eight-passenger form until early next year, there is also a brand-new, midsize version for 2017 that is a whopping 740 pounds lighter, more economical, more agile, and more refined.
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | Alfred Lubrano, Jan Hefler, and Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writers
Higher wages for professionals and a jump in the number of low-end jobs combined to give the income of Philadelphians a surprising boost in 2015. The 5.5 percent spike in median household income jibes with a similar rise nationwide. Most of the suburbs also enjoyed satisfying income bumps, with Delaware County leading the way with a robust 7.2 percent increase. Of Philadelphia's surrounding counties, just Burlington and Gloucester registered income shortfalls. The data come from the U.S. Census American Community Survey released Thursday.
NEWS
August 19, 2016
By Desmond Lachman In assessing U.S. economic prospects beyond November's election, it bears emphasizing how precarious the state of the global economy appears to be. While the U.S. economy might be reasonably healthy, the rest of the world is decidedly not. This would underline the need for steady U.S. world economic leadership. It would also argue strongly against any U.S. action that might hasten the move to beggar-thy-neighbor policies around the world that would be detrimental to both U.S. and global economic prosperity.
NEWS
August 13, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Trump's flaws are dangerous A letter signed by 50 former senior Republican security officials claimed that Donald Trump is unfit for the presidency (Philly.com, Monday). Were I still teaching at Rider University, I would use Trump's response as an example of a person trying to reduce cognitive dissonance or discomfort. The letter criticized Trump's knowledge, values, temperament, and behavior. To maintain his self-esteem and avoid the hard work required to change, Trump impugned the signees' motives.
NEWS
July 21, 2016
ISSUE | VIOLENCE End police bias, economic injustice The Opportunities Industrialization Center of America (OICA) mourns the senseless deaths of Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, and the officers killed in Dallas ("Obama: Don't despair," July 13). The issues of police brutality, most notably against African Americans, and attacks on police are serious issues that our country must address while also working to put an end to racial discrimination. OICA stands with those who are working to root out injustices.
NEWS
July 4, 2016
BERLIN - Lilas Al Loulou was an English literature major in Damascus and a political activist during the Arab Spring uprising. Firas Ibrahim owned a photo studio in Damascus that made wedding videos. Ahmed Samer ran a small business in Aleppo with his wife that sold air conditioners and fridges. All three fled Syria's civil war and made the risky sea journey to Greece and onward to Germany in 2015. They don't fit the fearsome stereotypes that drove the Brexit vote and have propelled populist parties across Europe.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2016 | By Joel Naroff
We all like tax breaks, but fiscal responsibility requires more than just cutting taxes. Nothing shows that more than the budget implications of the fiscal policies of the two leading candidates for president. With the party conventions nearing, it's time to start thinking about the financial realities of the Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton economic proposals. Of course, the Republican is the fiscally responsible one while the Democrat will cause the deficit to soar, right? Not in this year of unpredictable politics.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Robert Johnson attended Warren Buffett's most recent Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting, and on the flight out to Nebraska he was pleasantly surprised to learn that the book he had authored, Strategic Value Investing , had landed on the Oracle of Omaha's recommended-reading list. Credentials established, Johnson, who is also the president of the American College of Financial Services in Bryn Mawr, gave us his outlook on which sectors of the economy might come out ahead under a President Trump, and which under a President Clinton.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Now that Republicans and Democrats have mostly sorted their choices for president, isn't it time for Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and their interpreters to show us more about how they will raise money and pay for their schemes of growth and greatness? How do Americans want our taxes spent? "Helping to ensure the Social Security system will not run out of money should be the top economic issue addressed by the next U.S. President," agreed 640 of the 1,000 adults queried last month by Harris Poll for the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the pros licensed to track money for businesses and people who can afford CPAs.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
Positive economic trends and faster-paced household creation in the first quarter kept the Philadelphia area's rental-apartment sector producing "solid results" for property owners, real estate investment services firm Marcus & Millichap reported Tuesday. Rents in the region were increasing "modestly and consistently," the firm said, while vacancy rates will fluctuate in a tight range this year. Marcus & Millichap cited persistent and exceptional "demand-side dynamics" in the market, with several years of employment growth creating a "large pipeline" of current and potential renters.
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