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September 23, 2011
Player             School           Class           Major Robert Church    Drexel             So.       Sport mngmt. Jeff Crosby          Cabrini             So.           Finance Chris Ficke          Villanova          Sr.       Accounting Travis Gregory       Haverford          Sr.        Economics Dillon Hamill       Haverford          Jr.
NEWS
July 25, 2005
IT IS AWFUL THAT terrorist attacks on London's subways caused the death of so many innocent victims. But it is also appalling, as Rob Thomas of the alternative-music band Matchbox Twenty stated during the Live 8 concert in Philadelphia "that more Africans die from preventable disease on a daily basis than twice the people who died during the infamous 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York. " However, unless a person is watching public television, tragedies in industrialized nations always garner more media attention than those in undeveloped nations.
NEWS
October 10, 1988 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Something Sen. Dan Quayle cheerfully said during the debate has lifted a heavy load of worry from my mind. It came after Sen. Lloyd Bentsen pointed out that under the Reagan administration, we have become the No. 1 debtor nation in the world. As Bentsen said: "They've (foreign nations) bought 10 percent of the manufacturing base of this country. They bought 20 percent of the banks. They own 46 percent of the commercial real estate in Los Angeles. They're buying America on the cheap.
FOOD
December 18, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Organic farming can yield "real and significant" environmental and health benefits, but the jury is still out on whether it pays farmers to adopt such a strategy, two analysts write. More research "designed to increase the profitability of alternative agriculture deserves serious consideration," according to Pierre R. Crosson and Janet Ekey Ostrov. Farmers "receive few of the environmental benefits of alternative agriculture because many of these, such as improved water quality, occur off the farm, or like improved wildlife habitat, cannot be captured in economic terms," they wrote in a newsletter of Resources for the Future, a Washington- based environmental policy research organization.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1990 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
A huge yellow banner with red and black words is erected against the edge of a sidewalk in Southwest Philadelphia, soliciting passing drivers to blow their horns for "Black Power. " Meanwhile, a handful of protesters passes out fliers or yells to passers- by, alerting them that the Wild Wild West hoagie shop at 52nd Street and Kingsessing Avenue "is closed. " The shop owner has obtained a court order to keep the protesters - most of whom are activists from outside the neighborhood - at arm's length, while some residents patronize the shop despite the demonstration.
NEWS
October 3, 2015
Backing Francis on economics Antony Davies and James R. Harrigan claim Pope Francis' views on capitalism and free-market economics are wrong ("Francis is the pope, but he's no economic expert," Sunday). His familiarity with economics "is predicated on fallacy and fantasy," Davies and Harrigan observe. Drawing on data from the Fraser Institute, they claim that people in free, unregulated economic markets "enjoy higher standards of living . . . and suffer less income and gender inequality.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook and Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writers
Lawrence R. Klein, 93, of Gladwyne, a University of Pennsylvania economics professor who won a Nobel Prize and was considered the father of modern economic forecasting, died Sunday, Oct. 20, of a heart ailment at his home. Dr. Klein, who observed both the Depression and the post-World War II boom, influenced many of the current generation of economic forecasters by developing models in the 1950s and 1960s. Many of the economic forecasts taken as commonplace today - such as the effect of interest rates on economic growth - exist because of Dr. Klein's innovations, say economists.
NEWS
October 27, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Freakonomics: odd word, two roots that don't belong to the same tree. The ?onomics part speaks of the august, dour study of economics. But freak speaks of - freaks and the freaky. The word says it all: Look closely at the reasons people do things, and what you find can be really - freaky. Coined by economist Steven D. Levitt and journalist Stephen J. Dubner, freakonomics is on many people's lips. Dubner appears at 12:30 p.m. today at the Free Library to talk about their new book, Superfreakonomics.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1988 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chances are their names won't sound familiar. But you will hear from them. Of that, they are sure. They are tomorrow's leaders, and at 16 and 17 years of age, they are facing the problems of today. "They are our future," said Lila Booth, a business consultant. "We are talking about posterity here. " On Friday, under the watchful eye of Booth, 42 youngsters, graduating from a program in which they learned about business from businesspeople, showed that they had also learned a lot about life.
NEWS
February 7, 2006
THE EDITORIAL board must have been out sick when economic fundamentals were taught in high school, or they would've learned that governmental control of salaries (minimum wage) is one of the main tenets of socialism. The board is free to pander to those who lack education or drive to make a decent living without state handouts disguised as progressive legislation. Employees are paid their worth as determined by the market. Those unhappy with their lot need to work to improve it. For advice and inspiration, they can turn to millions of us who earn a living wage without the benefits of state interference.
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BUSINESS
May 1, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Now that Republicans and Democrats have mostly sorted their choices for president, isn't it time for Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and their interpreters to show us more about how they will raise money and pay for their schemes of growth and greatness? How do Americans want our taxes spent? "Helping to ensure the Social Security system will not run out of money should be the top economic issue addressed by the next U.S. President," agreed 640 of the 1,000 adults queried last month by Harris Poll for the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the pros licensed to track money for businesses and people who can afford CPAs.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
Positive economic trends and faster-paced household creation in the first quarter kept the Philadelphia area's rental-apartment sector producing "solid results" for property owners, real estate investment services firm Marcus & Millichap reported Tuesday. Rents in the region were increasing "modestly and consistently," the firm said, while vacancy rates will fluctuate in a tight range this year. Marcus & Millichap cited persistent and exceptional "demand-side dynamics" in the market, with several years of employment growth creating a "large pipeline" of current and potential renters.
NEWS
April 11, 2016
ISSUE | ENERGY Pipelines mean jobs "A Pipeline for Growth," a report by the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, is a practical blueprint for natural-gas infrastructure development that will ensure Pennsylvania's economic future. The report outlines the economic benefits of creating infrastructure to brand Philadelphia as the next global energy hub. Building pipelines to transport natural gas and natural-gas liquids will: Spur an energy and manufacturing boom benefiting the regional economy.
NEWS
April 7, 2016
It is battling the fallout from the state budget impasse and has higher crime rates than its neighbors. But Delaware County council members said Tuesday in their annual "State of the County" address at the Llanerch Country Club that the county's 2016 economic prospects are robust. They said that two projects - Sunoco Logistics' Mariner East natural-gas pipelines and the reconstruction of the Granite Run Mall - would yield more than 1,000 full-time jobs when completed. They also touted an initiative to combat the nation's heroin epidemic.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2016 | By Joel Naroff
The Pennsylvania primary is a few weeks away, and for the first time in memory, the vote for the presidential candidates may actually be meaningful. While the remaining hopefuls have separated themselves by personality, the question that concerns me is this: Are there differences in the candidates' economic strategies that voters should be aware of before they enter the voting booth? In this first of two columns, I will discuss the three Republican candidates' economic proposals.
NEWS
March 26, 2016
By Benjamin Zycher Economics may be the dismal science, and economists may be boring, but there really are a few eternal economic truths worthy of inscription in stone. The quantity of a good demanded declines as its price rises. Bigger economies demand more labor, that is, create more jobs. Economic distortions created by government may bestow benefits upon particular groups but, for the economy as a whole, harm the economic interests of both consumers and producers by reducing the size of the aggregate economic basket.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
MORAINE, Ohio - A long line stretched across the parking lot outside a massive factory here, once a General Motors Corp. plant churning out Chevy Blazers, now producing windshields for Fuyao Glass America, a Chinese company. The people weren't there looking for jobs, but for answers: how to bring back Ohio's shrinking industrial base, the foundation of the middle class, and get wages growing again. "What can they do is the question," said Richard Franks, 60, an engineer who was waiting Friday to hear Republican presidential candidate John Kasich, the state's governor.
NEWS
March 1, 2016 | By Benjamin Powell
Politicians of both parties are prone to making economically illiterate promises and claims during campaign seasons. Donald Trump is turning this illiteracy into an art form. One of his latest insane promises is to force Apple to manufacture in the United States. In a recent speech at Liberty University, Trump boasted, "We're going to get Apple to build their damn computers in this country instead of other countries. " In these few words, Trump gets trade economics wrong and shows his ignorance of modern manufacturing.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2016
It is shocking, at least to me, that businessman Donald Trump appears on track to be the Republican nominee for president. Sen. Bernie Sanders' success in the Democratic race is equally surprising. Both candidates seemed on the far fringes of the presidential race just a few months ago. What's going on? "It's the economy, stupid. " There's no dispute that our economy has made big strides since the Great Recession. Businesses have added jobs for a record six consecutive years, and unemployment has fallen below 5 percent, which is roughly consistent with a full-employment economy.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia's largest private employer, spent $900 million on construction projects in the five years ended June 30. An additional $248 million in construction is underway. Employment at the university, which includes the massive University of Pennsylvania Health System, climbed to 37,000 from 31,000 five years ago. Compensation, including salaries, wages, and benefits, totaled $3.89 billion in fiscal 2015, up from $2.98 billion in 2010. Those and other aspects of the tax-exempt organization's operations add up to an annual economic impact of $14.3 billion in Pennsylvania, according to a report released Wednesday.
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