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September 23, 2011
Player             School           Class           Major Robert Church    Drexel             So.       Sport mngmt. Jeff Crosby          Cabrini             So.           Finance Chris Ficke          Villanova          Sr.       Accounting Travis Gregory       Haverford          Sr.        Economics Dillon Hamill       Haverford          Jr.
NEWS
July 25, 2005
IT IS AWFUL THAT terrorist attacks on London's subways caused the death of so many innocent victims. But it is also appalling, as Rob Thomas of the alternative-music band Matchbox Twenty stated during the Live 8 concert in Philadelphia "that more Africans die from preventable disease on a daily basis than twice the people who died during the infamous 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York. " However, unless a person is watching public television, tragedies in industrialized nations always garner more media attention than those in undeveloped nations.
NEWS
October 10, 1988 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Something Sen. Dan Quayle cheerfully said during the debate has lifted a heavy load of worry from my mind. It came after Sen. Lloyd Bentsen pointed out that under the Reagan administration, we have become the No. 1 debtor nation in the world. As Bentsen said: "They've (foreign nations) bought 10 percent of the manufacturing base of this country. They bought 20 percent of the banks. They own 46 percent of the commercial real estate in Los Angeles. They're buying America on the cheap.
FOOD
December 18, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Organic farming can yield "real and significant" environmental and health benefits, but the jury is still out on whether it pays farmers to adopt such a strategy, two analysts write. More research "designed to increase the profitability of alternative agriculture deserves serious consideration," according to Pierre R. Crosson and Janet Ekey Ostrov. Farmers "receive few of the environmental benefits of alternative agriculture because many of these, such as improved water quality, occur off the farm, or like improved wildlife habitat, cannot be captured in economic terms," they wrote in a newsletter of Resources for the Future, a Washington- based environmental policy research organization.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1990 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
A huge yellow banner with red and black words is erected against the edge of a sidewalk in Southwest Philadelphia, soliciting passing drivers to blow their horns for "Black Power. " Meanwhile, a handful of protesters passes out fliers or yells to passers- by, alerting them that the Wild Wild West hoagie shop at 52nd Street and Kingsessing Avenue "is closed. " The shop owner has obtained a court order to keep the protesters - most of whom are activists from outside the neighborhood - at arm's length, while some residents patronize the shop despite the demonstration.
NEWS
October 3, 2015
Backing Francis on economics Antony Davies and James R. Harrigan claim Pope Francis' views on capitalism and free-market economics are wrong ("Francis is the pope, but he's no economic expert," Sunday). His familiarity with economics "is predicated on fallacy and fantasy," Davies and Harrigan observe. Drawing on data from the Fraser Institute, they claim that people in free, unregulated economic markets "enjoy higher standards of living . . . and suffer less income and gender inequality.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook and Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writers
Lawrence R. Klein, 93, of Gladwyne, a University of Pennsylvania economics professor who won a Nobel Prize and was considered the father of modern economic forecasting, died Sunday, Oct. 20, of a heart ailment at his home. Dr. Klein, who observed both the Depression and the post-World War II boom, influenced many of the current generation of economic forecasters by developing models in the 1950s and 1960s. Many of the economic forecasts taken as commonplace today - such as the effect of interest rates on economic growth - exist because of Dr. Klein's innovations, say economists.
NEWS
October 27, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Freakonomics: odd word, two roots that don't belong to the same tree. The ?onomics part speaks of the august, dour study of economics. But freak speaks of - freaks and the freaky. The word says it all: Look closely at the reasons people do things, and what you find can be really - freaky. Coined by economist Steven D. Levitt and journalist Stephen J. Dubner, freakonomics is on many people's lips. Dubner appears at 12:30 p.m. today at the Free Library to talk about their new book, Superfreakonomics.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1988 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chances are their names won't sound familiar. But you will hear from them. Of that, they are sure. They are tomorrow's leaders, and at 16 and 17 years of age, they are facing the problems of today. "They are our future," said Lila Booth, a business consultant. "We are talking about posterity here. " On Friday, under the watchful eye of Booth, 42 youngsters, graduating from a program in which they learned about business from businesspeople, showed that they had also learned a lot about life.
NEWS
February 7, 2006
THE EDITORIAL board must have been out sick when economic fundamentals were taught in high school, or they would've learned that governmental control of salaries (minimum wage) is one of the main tenets of socialism. The board is free to pander to those who lack education or drive to make a decent living without state handouts disguised as progressive legislation. Employees are paid their worth as determined by the market. Those unhappy with their lot need to work to improve it. For advice and inspiration, they can turn to millions of us who earn a living wage without the benefits of state interference.
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NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
What do the knucklehead hits Step Brothers , Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby , and those two Anchorman pics have in common? All directed and co-written by Adam McKay. And what does The Big Short - a prestige year-end release, based on the nonfiction prize-winning book by Michael Lewis about the housing and credit bubble that triggered the Great Recession - have to do with any of that? McKay, written and directed by. "Look at me on paper and you see the guy who did Step Brothers , and this doesn't seem like a logical next project," McKay says.
NEWS
December 31, 2015
By Antony Davies and James R. Harrigan Once again, the Fraser Institute has released its annual Economic Freedom of North America report. And once again - unsurprisingly- the United States is in a downward spiral. Over the past 15 years, the United States has dropped from an 8.6 on Fraser's 10-point scale to a 7.7. In 2000, Fraser ranked the United States as the most economically free country on the planet. Today, we are 14th - less economically free than Canada, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, and the United Arab Emirates.
NEWS
December 18, 2015
IT IS well-documented that the American middle class is shrinking. The Pew Research Center said recently that after four decades as the nation's economic majority, "the American middle class is now matched in number by those in the economic tiers above and below it. " Not only that, in 2015, 20 percent of adults were in the lowest-income tier, compared with 16 percent in 1971, Pew found. If you're in the middle or lower tiers, what do you do with this information? Maybe it's time to embrace a new normal, at least where it concerns your adult children starting out. Consider the message young people get when we say: *  "As soon as you're 18, you're out of here.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2015
It's December, which means it's time for economists to make their annual prognostications. And when making a forecast, it's always good to know where you have come from, so you can understand where you are going. As far as the region's economy is concerned, if the past really is prologue, next year should be very good. First, a look back at 2015. It was better, but not as strong as we would like to have seen it. The final numbers for this year will not be in for a while, but so far, economic growth has been good.
NEWS
November 12, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky attacked one of the rising stars of the Republican presidential field, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, as a big spender who would put the nation deeper into debt with a new child tax credit and $1 trillion in increased funding for the military. "You get something that looks to me not very conservative," Paul said during the fourth GOP debate Tuesday in Milwaukee. "I know that Rand is a committed isolationist," Rubio shot back. "I'm not. " Paul has not called for pulling back U.S. defenses, but has expressed caution about the use of force.
NEWS
October 3, 2015
Backing Francis on economics Antony Davies and James R. Harrigan claim Pope Francis' views on capitalism and free-market economics are wrong ("Francis is the pope, but he's no economic expert," Sunday). His familiarity with economics "is predicated on fallacy and fantasy," Davies and Harrigan observe. Drawing on data from the Fraser Institute, they claim that people in free, unregulated economic markets "enjoy higher standards of living . . . and suffer less income and gender inequality.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University's presence and operations at its main campus in Glassboro generate an annual economic impact of about $108 million, according to a report the university commissioned. The report was released Tuesday and prepared by Philadelphia-based Econsult Solutions Inc. Econsult reported in February that Rowan directly spends $650 million in New Jersey, generating a total statewide impact of $1.23 billion. Rowan paid $45,000 for the two reports. In Glassboro, Rowan directly spends about $89.4 million each year, including $29.3 million by students and $55.2 million in operations.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HAZEL GRAY didn't hesitate to take a share of the credit for the success of her famous son, the late Rev. William H. Gray III. She believed that his attainments as a Baptist minister, congressman and head of the United Negro College Fund could be traced back to the values he was taught at home. "He was a very good boy," she once said of her son. "It was just expected and never questioned that children would be obedient and respectful. That seems to be missing in many homes these days.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
As a pediatrician at the Cobbs Creek Primary Care Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Roy Wade Jr. employs the usual tools of his trade, such as thermometer, tongue depressor, and stethoscope. But as a researcher, he is working to develop a different kind of tool kit: a questionnaire to help pediatricians figure out which of their young patients are at greatest risk to develop early cognitive, emotional, and health problems. Wade's work builds on the landmark 1998 ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences)
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside the gates of PPL Park on game days, nearly 18,500 fans bustle around the $122 million Major League Soccer stadium on the Chester waterfront. They cheer the Union, they relax, they buy drinks and food. For a few hours, it's an image from Chester that few might recognize. But by the day's end, those visitors abruptly leave - returning to homes far outside Chester's city limits - without ever venturing beyond the I-95 ramp leading to the complex. It's been nearly five years since PPL Park opened with high expectations: The stadium would become a hub for economic development, the centerpiece of a waterfront stretch that would include housing, corporate offices, and a convention center.
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