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Economics

NEWS
November 20, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Joseph F. Flubacher entered La Salle College in 1931, the Depression was grinding the country down. La Salle was all-male, all-commuter, practically all-white, and tuition was $400 a year. By the time Flubacher ceased his weekly visits to the campus about a year ago, America was enjoying a record bull market. La Salle had become a university, the student body included more women than men, residents outnumbered commuters in the freshman class, minorities accounted for a fifth of the student body, and annual tuition stood at nearly $15,000.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1992 | By Andrew Cassel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
An American whose life work has been devoted to showing how economic logic governs everyday personal decisions, from marriage to divorce, yesterday won the Nobel Prize in economics. Gary S. Becker, 61, a professor of sociology and economics at the University of Chicago, won the $1.2 million prize for extending "the sphere of economic analysis to new areas of human behavior and relations," the Swedish Academy of Sciences said. Becker figured out that people usually consider the economic consequences when making a wide variety of such everyday decisions as whether to get married or divorced, whether to have a baby, or how much money to leave their children.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
What if President Bush had his way and persuaded Congress to pass a cut in the capital-gains tax? What if, instead, Sen. Patrick Moynihan (D., N.Y.) had his way and managed to get a cut in the Social Security tax? What if both taxes were cut and, at the same time, the tax rate on incomes above $200,000 a year were raised from 28 to 38 percent? What if, to raise revenues, Congress enacted a $5-a-barrel fee on imported oil? A 50-cents-a-gallon tax on gasoline? A 1 percent national sales tax?
BUSINESS
October 11, 2005 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Robert J. Aumann and Thomas C. Schelling won the Nobel Prize in economics yesterday for establishing game theory as the dominant approach to understanding conflict and cooperation between countries, individuals and businesses. Game theory is a branch of mathematics that uses models to study strategies that can be applied to price wars, labor negotiations, arms races and warfare. Aumann, 75, an Israeli American, and Schelling, 84, an American, were honored for their contribution to understanding why "some groups of individuals, organizations and countries succeed in promoting cooperation while others suffer from conflict," said the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which selects the winner.
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | By Chuck Collins and Christie Balka
From watching the national media discuss the roller-coaster stock market, you'd think that everyone owned stocks. But most Americans have gained nothing from the bull market of the 1990s. Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan himself reminds us that stock market increases have not led "to a rise in the share of stock and mutual-fund assets owned by the bottom 90 percent of the wealth distribution. " When the stock market plummeted a few months ago, the good news was that the sinking tide didn't lower all boats.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | By Bill Frischling, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The man who was struck and killed by an Amtrak train near the Bryn Mawr station Wednesday night was identified yesterday as John F. Stehle, an assistant professor of economics at Villanova University. Stehle, 43, of Bryn Mawr, was standing on the eastbound tracks about 200 feet from the station when he was struck by the Harrisburg-to- Philadelphia train. He was pronounced dead at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Lower Merion Police Lt. Mike Tansey said police do not know why Stehle was standing on the tracks.
NEWS
July 30, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arnold H. Raphaelson, 80, of Dresher, professor emeritus of economics at Temple University, died of complications from lung cancer Thursday, July 22, at Abington Memorial Hospital. Dr. Raphaelson taught undergraduate and graduate students at Temple for 40 years until retiring in 2006. "Arnie loved teaching and put his heart and soul into it," said Richard E. Bernstein, an associate professor of economics at Temple. "He was witty and conscientious and was an old-school, chalk-and-talk guy. " Dr. Raphaelson served on Temple's Education Program and Policy Committee and on the Faculty Senate and its steering committee.
NEWS
November 23, 1991
The byline of a Nov. 15 Commentary Page article about cable television regulation was misspelled. The article was written by John F. Stehle, an assistant professor of economics at Villanova University.
SPORTS
September 23, 2011
Player              School           Class        Major Dan Drazen          Rutgers-Camden Jr.        Economics Brendan Kelly          Villanova          Sr.        Finance Andrew Mason       Temple             Sr.     Real estate Michael Serensits    Drexel             Jr.        Bus. admin. Greg Verde             Cabrini             So.
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Edward J. Burns, 83, an Augustinian priest and retired professor, administrator and missionary, died of a stroke Tuesday at Paoli Memorial Hospital. He lived at St. Thomas Monastery at Villanova University. Father Burns was born in Torrington, Conn., and graduated from Torrington High School. In 1934, he entered the Augustinian Order of the Province of St. Thomas of Villanova. In 1937, he graduated from Villanova College with a bachelor's degree in philosophy and then went on to study theology at the Augustinian College in Washington.
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