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Economics

BUSINESS
December 7, 2015
It's December, which means it's time for economists to make their annual prognostications. And when making a forecast, it's always good to know where you have come from, so you can understand where you are going. As far as the region's economy is concerned, if the past really is prologue, next year should be very good. First, a look back at 2015. It was better, but not as strong as we would like to have seen it. The final numbers for this year will not be in for a while, but so far, economic growth has been good.
NEWS
November 12, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky attacked one of the rising stars of the Republican presidential field, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, as a big spender who would put the nation deeper into debt with a new child tax credit and $1 trillion in increased funding for the military. "You get something that looks to me not very conservative," Paul said during the fourth GOP debate Tuesday in Milwaukee. "I know that Rand is a committed isolationist," Rubio shot back. "I'm not. " Paul has not called for pulling back U.S. defenses, but has expressed caution about the use of force.
NEWS
October 3, 2015
Backing FrancisĀ on economics Antony Davies and James R. Harrigan claim Pope Francis' views on capitalism and free-market economics are wrong ("Francis is the pope, but he's no economic expert," Sunday). His familiarity with economics "is predicated on fallacy and fantasy," Davies and Harrigan observe. Drawing on data from the Fraser Institute, they claim that people in free, unregulated economic markets "enjoy higher standards of living . . . and suffer less income and gender inequality.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University's presence and operations at its main campus in Glassboro generate an annual economic impact of about $108 million, according to a report the university commissioned. The report was released Tuesday and prepared by Philadelphia-based Econsult Solutions Inc. Econsult reported in February that Rowan directly spends $650 million in New Jersey, generating a total statewide impact of $1.23 billion. Rowan paid $45,000 for the two reports. In Glassboro, Rowan directly spends about $89.4 million each year, including $29.3 million by students and $55.2 million in operations.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HAZEL GRAY didn't hesitate to take a share of the credit for the success of her famous son, the late Rev. William H. Gray III. She believed that his attainments as a Baptist minister, congressman and head of the United Negro College Fund could be traced back to the values he was taught at home. "He was a very good boy," she once said of her son. "It was just expected and never questioned that children would be obedient and respectful. That seems to be missing in many homes these days.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
As a pediatrician at the Cobbs Creek Primary Care Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Roy Wade Jr. employs the usual tools of his trade, such as thermometer, tongue depressor, and stethoscope. But as a researcher, he is working to develop a different kind of tool kit: a questionnaire to help pediatricians figure out which of their young patients are at greatest risk to develop early cognitive, emotional, and health problems. Wade's work builds on the landmark 1998 ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences)
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside the gates of PPL Park on game days, nearly 18,500 fans bustle around the $122 million Major League Soccer stadium on the Chester waterfront. They cheer the Union, they relax, they buy drinks and food. For a few hours, it's an image from Chester that few might recognize. But by the day's end, those visitors abruptly leave - returning to homes far outside Chester's city limits - without ever venturing beyond the I-95 ramp leading to the complex. It's been nearly five years since PPL Park opened with high expectations: The stadium would become a hub for economic development, the centerpiece of a waterfront stretch that would include housing, corporate offices, and a convention center.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sayre P. Schatz, 92, of Melrose Park, an internationally known expert on African economics and professor emeritus of economics at Temple University, died Thursday, May 7, of Alzheimer's disease at the Quadrangle in Haverford. A World War II veteran, Dr. Schatz was drawn to the field of African economics in the 1950s, when few scholars were interested in the subject. He went on to author several books and dozens of articles on the topic, many of which were translated into other languages.
REAL_ESTATE
May 11, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Since 1980, projects by New Jersey's nonprofit community developers have poured $12 billion into the state's economy, an analysis of data shows. In the last 25 years, said economist Lee Huang, of Econsult Solutions of Philadelphia, 21,000 residential units and 2.5 million square feet of commercial space were completed by community-development corporations in New Jersey. That represents 1,506 projects - residential, commercial, and mixed-use, Huang said - for a total investment of $6 billion.
NEWS
April 30, 2015
BALTIMORE. Ferguson. Detroit. Watts. Harlem. Philadelphia. The through line for the protests sparked in these and other cities, in a history that spans well over 50 years, is not civil rights, or racial tensions. It's police brutality. Questionable arrests, mistreatment or killing of blacks in the past year by police officers in Ferguson, New York and Baltimore were the same sparks that launched the seminal protests of 50 years ago in Detroit, Watts and other places, which fed the larger civil-rights movement.
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