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BUSINESS
April 9, 1987 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard E. Anderson, a Wharton School economist and former schoolmate of Mayor Goode, yesterday was named to head the Urban Affairs Partnership, a private civic organization dedicated to working on socio-economic problems in the area. Anderson, 48, succeeds James Bodine as managing partner of the group, which aims to increase the social consciousness of Philadelphia businesses. "I've had this job for 7 1/2 years," Bodine, 66, said yesterday. "It's time for me to hang it up. " Anderson, now a senior economist at Wharton's Center for Applied Research, was director of the social science division of the Rockefeller Foundation from 1979 to 1985.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
William A. Niskanen, 78, an economist who was dismissed by Ford Motor Co. after bluntly opposing the company's embrace of trade protection, and who later was a member of President Ronald Reagan's Council of Economic Advisers, died Wednesday in Washington. His death, of a stroke, was announced by the Cato Institute, the libertarian research organization, where he had been chairman for 23 years before stepping down in 2008. Mr. Niskanen had a long career as an economist, both in and out of government.
NEWS
December 17, 2012
Albert Hirschman, 97, who worked at prestigious colleges and institutes and wrote some of the most perceptive works of social science in his era, has died. Through his books, lectures, and essays, Dr. Hirschman, who died Dec. 10, sought to apply rigorous and rational social-science scholarship to clashes of political ideology and economic impasses - conflicts that have often fueled violence and repression. Having learned the stakes firsthand, he devoted his career to advancing economic development and the spread of democracy.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ursinus College on Thursday named the dean of economics and finance at Claremont McKenna College in California as its next president. S. Brock Blomberg, 48, a political economist who studies terrorism, replaces Lucien "Terry" Winegar, who had been serving as interim president since Bobby Fong's death in September. Blomberg takes over July 1 as the 17th president of Ursinus, a 1,600-student liberal arts college in Collegeville. "Our objective was to discover someone who could embrace the Ursinus DNA, our values and what we are about, who is passionate about the liberal arts, and comes with highly regarded leadership experience," Michael Marcon, a college trustee and search committee chair, said in a statement.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Miriam Cosand Ward, 96, a Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Camden County home economist who in the 1970s taught thousands of New Jerseyans how to sew, plan meala, and run a household, died of congestive heart failure on Sunday, Dec. 23, at her home at Medford Leas, a continuing care retirement community. Mrs. Ward had been a champion of good nutrition and a mentor to future homemakers since graduating from Earlham College in Richmond, Ind., in 1937. After carrying a double major in mathematics and home economics, she chose the latter career path, and stuck with it until her retirement in 1980.
NEWS
January 10, 2013
James M. Buchanan, 93, who won the 1986 Nobel Prize for applying the principles of economic self-interest to understand why politicians do what they do, died Wednesday in Blacksburg, Va. No cause of death was given. Mr. Buchanan, a professor emeritus at George Mason University, was a pioneer in the field known as public-choice theory, which views government decisions through the personal interests of the bureaucrats and elected leaders who want to advance in their careers and win campaigns.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It may make you feel good, but donations of food and clothes to Japan probably will be wasted. That's the advice of Lehigh University economist Frank R. Gunter, a former Marine who helped coordinate the 2004 tsunami relief effort in Indonesia. "I think it makes people feel like they're doing something, and there's a tax deduction, but it doesn't do good," Gunter said. Medical assistance will be useful to the Japanese in the first three days, but the only outfit already in position to offer that is the U.S. Navy, he said.
NEWS
July 8, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene C. Zorn Jr. wasn't prone to exaggeration. He was a nationally recognized economist, a sober, no-nonsense man who dealt with facts and figures. So his son, Robert, was caught off guard when, in 1980, the elder Zorn offered an unusual preface before launching into a story: "After you hear this, you may think your old man's off his rocker. " "I was driving and my hands tightened on the steering wheel," Robert Zorn recalled. "He never referred to himself as my 'old man.' " His father then began a riveting tale that kept the 22-year-old Wharton School student up all night.
NEWS
December 16, 2013
An article in Sunday's Inquirer mischaracterized writer and philosopher Ayn Rand as an economist.
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NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ursinus College on Thursday named the dean of economics and finance at Claremont McKenna College in California as its next president. S. Brock Blomberg, 48, a political economist who studies terrorism, replaces Lucien "Terry" Winegar, who had been serving as interim president since Bobby Fong's death in September. Blomberg takes over July 1 as the 17th president of Ursinus, a 1,600-student liberal arts college in Collegeville. "Our objective was to discover someone who could embrace the Ursinus DNA, our values and what we are about, who is passionate about the liberal arts, and comes with highly regarded leadership experience," Michael Marcon, a college trustee and search committee chair, said in a statement.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter wants Philadelphians to take a look at the numbers and see how their city has done over the last seven years with him at the helm. The murder rate has hit a historic low, jobs have trickled back into town, and the city is putting more money into its schools than at any time in 30 years. Experts eye those numbers and say yes, but consider: Crime fell nationwide, as did joblessness. The schools are running on bare-bones budgets, and Philadelphia still has the highest poverty rate among big cities.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2014 | By Mark V. Pauly, For The Inquirer
The Obama administration has given employers a reprieve from the mandate that they offer their workers insurance at low employee premiums or pay a penalty. The enforcement is postponed until 2016. But should the mandate ever come back? Even strong supporters of the Affordable Care Act are divided. David Blumenthal, of the Commonwealth Fund, says the mandate on employers is needed to compel them to honor their "shared responsibility" to pay their workers' premiums. Tim Jost, a professor at Washington and Lee University and a leading backer and interpreter of the complex ACA rules, says the mandate has too many adverse side effects and should be "repealed and replaced" by something else.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Full recovery continued to elude the Philadelphia region's residential real estate market in the first quarter of this year, as the value of a typical home fell 4.9 percent from the last three months of 2013. University of Pennsylvania economist Kevin Gillen, who analyzed data from 11 area counties for Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Fox & Roach, said Tuesday that with the latest decline, average house prices in the region were "barely above the post-bubble bottom they hit two years ago. " While sales of 11,000 houses regionally were 10 percent above the same quarter of 2013, the numbers were 41 percent below what Gillen considered the "normal historic average.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Applications for mortgages to buy houses have been lagging so far this year - 16 percent below the pace for 2013. Yet, for the first time since 2009, applications to purchase are exceeding deals to refinance mortgages. The lower numbers for home-buying mortgages reflect continued weakness in the real estate market, even though the 30-year fixed rate fell Thursday to 4.21 percent - its low for the year so far. There are many reasons, according to economist Mark Zandi, chief economist of Moody's Analytics in West Chester.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Jonathan Lai, and Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writers
It has been a tough week for florists. And restaurants. And jewelers. And airlines. Oh, make that just about any business that depends on customers. After a relentless weeks-long onslaught of rough winter weather, Mother Nature did its best on Thursday to deck what was left of our region's economy. A foot of snow closed malls, shuttered stores, delayed travelers, and kept legions of workers at home with their wallets. "It is like everything else," said economist Joel Naroff of Bucks County.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. economy, while growing, will perform less well than was earlier predicted through most of 2014, but will finish the year with a bang, according to economists surveyed by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. With that late push, the forecasters see real gross domestic product - the total value of all goods and services in the economy - growing 2.8 percent in 2014, up from their prediction of 2.6 percent in the last quarterly survey. The bank said Friday that its survey of 45 forecasters showed economists scaling back projections for growth in the first nine months of the year, but the economy outperforming earlier forecasts when the October-December period rolls around.
NEWS
December 16, 2013
An article in Sunday's Inquirer mischaracterized writer and philosopher Ayn Rand as an economist.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time since the start of the recession in late 2007, the number of people filing initial claims for unemployment insurance in the month fell to 330,500 a week on average, the U.S. Labor Department reported Thursday. The news buoyed Wall Street, but the national story isn't what's happening in the Philadelphia region. "Philadelphia's economy has struggled this summer," said Ryan Sweet, an economist with Moody's Analytics in West Chester. The last time the national number was so low was in November 2007 - the month before the official start of what economists have described as the worst recession since the Great Depression.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2013 | By Joe McDonald, Associated Press
BEIJING - China's government has ordered companies to close factories in 19 industries where overproduction has led to price-cutting wars, affirming its determination to push ahead with a painful economic restructuring despite slowing growth. The industry ministry issued orders late Thursday to more than 1,400 companies to cut excess capacity that has led to financial trouble for manufacturers. The affected industries include steel, cement, copper, and glass. It requires some companies to close outright.
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