CollectionsEconomist
IN THE NEWS

Economist

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 9, 1987 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard E. Anderson, a Wharton School economist and former schoolmate of Mayor Goode, yesterday was named to head the Urban Affairs Partnership, a private civic organization dedicated to working on socio-economic problems in the area. Anderson, 48, succeeds James Bodine as managing partner of the group, which aims to increase the social consciousness of Philadelphia businesses. "I've had this job for 7 1/2 years," Bodine, 66, said yesterday. "It's time for me to hang it up. " Anderson, now a senior economist at Wharton's Center for Applied Research, was director of the social science division of the Rockefeller Foundation from 1979 to 1985.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
William A. Niskanen, 78, an economist who was dismissed by Ford Motor Co. after bluntly opposing the company's embrace of trade protection, and who later was a member of President Ronald Reagan's Council of Economic Advisers, died Wednesday in Washington. His death, of a stroke, was announced by the Cato Institute, the libertarian research organization, where he had been chairman for 23 years before stepping down in 2008. Mr. Niskanen had a long career as an economist, both in and out of government.
NEWS
December 17, 2012
Albert Hirschman, 97, who worked at prestigious colleges and institutes and wrote some of the most perceptive works of social science in his era, has died. Through his books, lectures, and essays, Dr. Hirschman, who died Dec. 10, sought to apply rigorous and rational social-science scholarship to clashes of political ideology and economic impasses - conflicts that have often fueled violence and repression. Having learned the stakes firsthand, he devoted his career to advancing economic development and the spread of democracy.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Miriam Cosand Ward, 96, a Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Camden County home economist who in the 1970s taught thousands of New Jerseyans how to sew, plan meala, and run a household, died of congestive heart failure on Sunday, Dec. 23, at her home at Medford Leas, a continuing care retirement community. Mrs. Ward had been a champion of good nutrition and a mentor to future homemakers since graduating from Earlham College in Richmond, Ind., in 1937. After carrying a double major in mathematics and home economics, she chose the latter career path, and stuck with it until her retirement in 1980.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ursinus College on Thursday named the dean of economics and finance at Claremont McKenna College in California as its next president. S. Brock Blomberg, 48, a political economist who studies terrorism, replaces Lucien "Terry" Winegar, who had been serving as interim president since Bobby Fong's death in September. Blomberg takes over July 1 as the 17th president of Ursinus, a 1,600-student liberal arts college in Collegeville. "Our objective was to discover someone who could embrace the Ursinus DNA, our values and what we are about, who is passionate about the liberal arts, and comes with highly regarded leadership experience," Michael Marcon, a college trustee and search committee chair, said in a statement.
NEWS
January 10, 2013
James M. Buchanan, 93, who won the 1986 Nobel Prize for applying the principles of economic self-interest to understand why politicians do what they do, died Wednesday in Blacksburg, Va. No cause of death was given. Mr. Buchanan, a professor emeritus at George Mason University, was a pioneer in the field known as public-choice theory, which views government decisions through the personal interests of the bureaucrats and elected leaders who want to advance in their careers and win campaigns.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It may make you feel good, but donations of food and clothes to Japan probably will be wasted. That's the advice of Lehigh University economist Frank R. Gunter, a former Marine who helped coordinate the 2004 tsunami relief effort in Indonesia. "I think it makes people feel like they're doing something, and there's a tax deduction, but it doesn't do good," Gunter said. Medical assistance will be useful to the Japanese in the first three days, but the only outfit already in position to offer that is the U.S. Navy, he said.
NEWS
July 8, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene C. Zorn Jr. wasn't prone to exaggeration. He was a nationally recognized economist, a sober, no-nonsense man who dealt with facts and figures. So his son, Robert, was caught off guard when, in 1980, the elder Zorn offered an unusual preface before launching into a story: "After you hear this, you may think your old man's off his rocker. " "I was driving and my hands tightened on the steering wheel," Robert Zorn recalled. "He never referred to himself as my 'old man.' " His father then began a riveting tale that kept the 22-year-old Wharton School student up all night.
NEWS
December 16, 2013
An article in Sunday's Inquirer mischaracterized writer and philosopher Ayn Rand as an economist.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
That raspy noise? It's the sound of the nation's economists, pundits, and prognosticators scratching their heads, trying to figure out how the nation's economy could have produced so few jobs in the month of May. Yes, the economy has been slowing, dealing with fallout from lower oil prices, China's stall, and problems in Europe. Payrolls that had grown by an average of 230,000 a month are now expanding more slowly, by an average of 116,000. Even so, the total of 38,000 jobs created in May was way lower than anyone expected - and it's not what some business leaders are seeing in their payrolls.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 4, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
The nation's payrolls expanded by 151,000 positions in August, while the unemployment rate stayed at 4.9 percent, where it has been throughout the summer, the U.S. Labor Department reported on Friday. "This was far from exciting, but 151,000 jobs is about right where we would expect the U.S. economy to be at this stage in the cycle," wrote James Marple, senior economist at TD Economics, an offshoot of TD Bank. "Given the August payroll report's tendency to underwhelm, the size of the miss likely had many breathing a sigh of relief," he said.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2016 | By Mark Zandi
Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton disagree about most everything. On economic policy, their differences couldn't be more stark. Especially important, at least when it comes to the key question of how to jump-start stronger economic growth, are their views on foreign immigration. Trump is clearly no fan of immigration. Curtailing the entry of migrants is one of his recurring campaign themes. He wants to build a wall between the United States and Mexico, institute a temporary ban on Muslims coming to the country, and, perhaps most important for the economy, he wants the more than 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S. to leave.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Three Obama administration veterans said Wednesday that Hillary Clinton, if elected president, should push for broad infrastructure investment during her first 100 days in office. "The first priority should be a decade-long, $1- to $2 trillion investment in renewing this country," Lawrence H. Summers, who was U.S. treasury secretary under Bill Clinton and director of the National Economic Council for Obama, said at a Politico Caucus panel in Center City. Summers painted a picture of peeling paint in schools, potholes in city streets, and a seemingly interminable five-year project to fix a bridge across the Charles River near his office at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
That raspy noise? It's the sound of the nation's economists, pundits, and prognosticators scratching their heads, trying to figure out how the nation's economy could have produced so few jobs in the month of May. Yes, the economy has been slowing, dealing with fallout from lower oil prices, China's stall, and problems in Europe. Payrolls that had grown by an average of 230,000 a month are now expanding more slowly, by an average of 116,000. Even so, the total of 38,000 jobs created in May was way lower than anyone expected - and it's not what some business leaders are seeing in their payrolls.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Higher inflation "has been set in motion," James Marple , senior economist for TD Bank Group , tells clients in a new report. Oil prices bounced back up 70 percent from May to February; he expects they'll rise modestly into next year, boosting price levels generally. Higher prices aren't all bad: "Wage pressures have been building," too, Marple adds, with median pay for people with jobs up 3 percent over the past year, faster than economic growth. Berwyn-based food analyst Jonathan Feeney tells his clients at Athlos Research to brace for rising prices on foreign grain, meats, and sweeteners.
NEWS
May 4, 2016
OSCEOLA, Ind . - Ted Cruz's conservative crusade for the presidency fought for new life Monday ahead of an Indiana vote that could effectively end the GOP's primary season. The fiery Texas senator hinted at an exit strategy, even as he vowed to compete to the end against surging Republican front-runner Donald Trump. "I am in for the distance - as long as we have a viable path to victory," Cruz told reporters after campaigning at a popular breakfast stop. With his supporters fearing Cruz could lose a seventh consecutive state Tuesday, the candidate's formulation hinted at a time when he may give up. Like Ohio Gov. John Kasich, Cruz is already mathematically eliminated from reaching a delegate majority before the Republican Party's national convention in July.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2016
As an economist, it is assumed I am an astute investor. The economy does determine the direction of the markets, right? Though that's true to some extent, investors must recognize that economic data provide current or even lagging indicators of activity, and are emotion- free. Meanwhile, the markets may be efficient, but that doesn't mean they don't move for periods of time on emotion, or on perceptions that don't match economic reality. That the economy and Wall Street may not be in sync is hardly an idea that requires a lot of research to back up. Just take the recent sharp decline in stock prices.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Princeton University's Angus Deaton won the Nobel Prize for economics by bringing his ivory-tower profession down to earth and into homes where people are uplifted - or punished - by social, industrial, trade, and tax policies. The Scotland-born Deaton, 69, earned his degrees at Britain's elite Cambridge University back when it gave students few mandatory courses and lots of discretion to pursue their interests, he told an applauding crowd Monday at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of International and Public Affairs hours after learning he had won the prize from the Sweden-based Nobel selection committee that included a Princeton colleague.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: My twin sister is a smart, successful professional. We're both near 40. I am married with three kids. She wants a family, too. Unfortunately, she has had a live-in boyfriend for several years. He didn't work for the first year after they moved in together (or do much of anything). Now another year has passed. He did get hourly work. She told him last year she didn't want to be with him but never kicked him out. Now, she tells me that he's not her boyfriend and that she doesn't want a family with him. Yet he remains there.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's not to like about June's 223,000 jobs bump in the nation's payrolls and an unemployment rate that declined to 5.3 percent - the lowest since April 2008? Plenty, as economists reacted to Thursday's employment report from the U.S. Department of Labor. Economists are concerned, despite hiring increases in nearly every major sector of the labor market, except mining and utilities. Although the jobless rate improved from 5.5 percent in May, the Labor Department revised April and May's employer job gains downward by a total 60,000.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|