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Economy

NEWS
November 4, 1991 | BY MIKE ROYKO
I got a hole in my shoe," said Slats Grobnik, "but I don't know what to do about it. " What are you talking about? Your choices are simple. Get a new pair of shoes or get the old pair resoled. "Not that simple. I wanna do what's best for the country. " What does a hole in your shoe have to do with the well-being of this country? "See? You never did know nothing about economics, did you? The hole in my shoe is what this recession is all about. " Your shoe? "It works this way. If I go out and buy a new pair of shoes, I'm gonna be spending money on consumer stuff, right?
NEWS
January 9, 2012 | BY WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
MANCHESTER, N.H. - Pastor Max Darbouze, a U.S. citizen born in Haiti and now a pastor at Grace of God Church amid the three-story working-class apartments on the east side of New Hampshire's largest city, showed up an hour early for the Newt Gingrich town hall yesterday because he wanted to learn one thing. It was a rough Christmas at Darbouze's church, with more toys doled out to poverty-stricken families than ever before, and even nonmembers walking in off the street begging for cash donations.
SPORTS
March 6, 1991 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boxers are known for absorbing blows, but the sluggish economy is forcing them to take the punches to their pocketbooks - an area that may be even more vulnerable than their chins or bellies. The hard times have become apparent with the Carl "The Truth" Williams- Tim Witherspoon card on Friday night at the Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City. Williams, who will defend his United States Boxing Association heavyweight title, will make $175,000, while former world champ Witherspoon will earn $165,000 - purses that would have been bigger, according to promoter Bob Arum, if the economy were healthier.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Six years ago, David A. Stockman, the brash Reagan administration budget director, left Washington, vilified by the city's establishment for warning that the President and Congress would drive the country to financial ruin by failing to cut the federal budget deficit. Today, the former supply-side Wunderkind, who has barely been heard from since arriving on Wall Street in 1986, sounds more like Pollyanna than Cassandra. He thinks the budget and the U.S. economy are back on a healthy track.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Metro Philadelphia's mix of corporate employers makes for a mellow regional economy, slow-growing but also recession-resistant. An Inquirer survey of more than 200 major employers shows the region's biggest job engines are the hospital system affiliated with Thomas Jefferson University, and the combination of the University of Pennsylvania and its hospital network. Other big employers include drugmakers and medical-device manufacturers such as Merck & Co. Inc. , GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
By Matt Joyce As I slid slowly into Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's glistening, space-age MRI machine recently, preparing for a 40-minute, $1,500 procedure that would yield more than 100 images of my injured wrist, thoughts of American entrepreneurship, preventive care, and the glaring ironies of our health-care system circled through my head. Three years ago, my former college roommate, Tim Ifill, and I started a nonprofit organization called Philly Fellows. Both of us chose to forgo traditional jobs with stable salaries and benefits to build a program that we were passionate about, and that we felt would make a tangible impact on the city of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 2, 2011 | By Siobhan Redding, MARPLE NEWTOWN HIGH SCHOOL
In today's economy, hard work does not seem to be enough for small businesses to prosper. Fulfilling the dream has become much more complicated. In the Philadelphia area, small-business owners have struggled with the difficulties of the uncertain economy. Independently owned Jacquette's Bakery in Broomall has struggled with the failing economy and has been able to survive. Dennis Jacquette, the pastry shop's owner for 31 years, described the economy's effect as "a little challenging, but not much of a problem.
NEWS
July 18, 1986
The editorial of July 10, "Time for action to boost growth of U.S. economy," correctly lists the economy's troubles, but does not say why it is in trouble. In 1945, the United States was the most outstanding industrial nation in the world. Japan, on the other hand, was prostrate, with Gen. Douglas MacArthur reordering Japanese life after that country's military defeat. In the post-war period, Japan de-emphasized militarism, but the United States concentrated on that activity.
NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By Christopher S. Rugaber and Paul Wiseman, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A streak of robust job growth came to a halt in March, signaling that U.S. employers may have grown cautious in a fragile economy. The gain of 88,000 jobs was the smallest in nine months. Even a decline in unemployment to a four-year low of 7.6 percent was nothing to cheer: The rate fell only because more people stopped looking for work and were no longer counted as unemployed. The weak jobs report Friday from the Labor Department caught analysts by surprise and served as a reminder that the economy is still recovering slowly nearly four years after the Great Recession ended.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Editor's note: As the economy struggles to find new footing, this occasional series will focus on areas of emerging demand for workers and the forces behind it. By the time developer Michael Pestronk closed on the deal to buy the old Goldtex textiles factory near 12th and Callowhill Streets, vandals had stripped out all the copper pipes and plenty of Philadelphia's graffiti "artists" had signed their names on the walls. With buckled floors, pigeon poop, and missing windows, it was a mess.
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