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NEWS
January 2, 2014
The top-searched story of 2013 on the Yahoo News website was the trial of Jodi Arias, the wispy Arizona woman convicted of stabbing her boyfriend nearly 30 times, slitting his throat from ear to ear, and shooting him in the forehead. Yes, America loves a love story, especially one that reads like a real-life episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent . Of course, there were many more important stories last year, and most will get new chapters in 2014. So will the Arias tale, when she returns to court for sentencing.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steady as it goes was the theme of this month's Business Outlook Survey released Thursday by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. The survey of area manufacturers showed continued modest improvement in economic activity and an optimism that things will be better in six months. It marked the seventh month in a row that the survey showed a positive response from manufacturers. The survey is based on responses from area manufacturers questioned about a series of business indicators and whether they were up or down for the month.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
CAIRO - It isn't easy being a senior lawyer for Egypt's deposed president, the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohammed Morsi. A respected jurist and former member of Egypt's upper house of parliament, Mohamad Tosson was clearly frustrated, as he talked to me over tea in a dim hotel lobby. He has been permitted to see Morsi only once since the military ousted and jailed him in July, after huge anti-Morsi protests. "His lawyers need to discuss the case with him, but they don't allow it," he told me. "They don't permit him family visits, or even to see his son. " "They" means the military.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Although fuel prices have been on something of a plateau recently, people are realizing that they are trending upward. That's why surveys are showing that prospective auto buyers are attaching a higher priority to fuel economy. So, let's look at some of the ways you can save on fuel and some of the ways automakers are helping you to do that. First, things you can do: Avoid jackrabbit starts. Lead-foot departures are a great way to waste gas or diesel. Instead of jumping on the gas and then laying off as you reach the desired speed, get away with a moderate, steady throttle opening.
NEWS
November 26, 2013
Congressional inaction could put more obstacles in the path of the already slow economic recovery. If lawmakers don't extend the Emergency Unemployment Compensation program, $25 billion in benefits - money that tends to be quickly spent on rent, food, and other necessities - would be ripped out of the economy. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office says the program is a highly effective antirecession measure. An estimated 1.3 million long-term-unemployed Americans are expected to lose the emergency benefits in December if Congress doesn't act. Another 850,000 could join them before next spring.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY Reducing property taxes, growing the economy, and revitalizing Atlantic City dominate this year's Second Legislative District races in Atlantic County. Democratic State Sen. James Whelan, a former mayor of Atlantic City and a fixture in local and state politics for 30 years, is being challenged by Republican Frank Balles, the Atlantic County sheriff. Republican Assembly incumbents John Amodeo and Chris A. Brown face two Democratic mayors, Nick Russo of Longport and Vince Mazzeo of Northfield.
REAL_ESTATE
October 21, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
In this post-housing-boom era, when prices still aren't what sellers want them to be, and there isn't a lot on the market, and a lot of folks are loath to move because of the uncertain economy, more people seem to be doing major renovations again - fixing up their houses for their own current use, or to update them for future sale. After several years of minor repairs and roof replacements, residential contractors say, they are once again getting big projects. Kim Pelkey and David Bushnell's undertaking, for example.
NEWS
September 26, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAWRENCEVILLE, N.J. For almost four months, Republican Steve Lonegan has relentlessly attacked Newark Mayor Cory Booker on any number of issues: his record on crime, his support of President Obama's health-care overhaul, his position on U.S. involvement in Syria. Striking a different tone Tuesday night at a forum hosted by the Rebovich Institute for New Jersey Politics at Rider University, Lonegan mentioned his Democratic rival's name just once and discussed Obamacare only when asked about it. Instead, in front of an audience of mostly college students, he spoke mainly about the economy and the threat he said it posed to America's youth.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moderation in all things seemed to be the theme of this month's Beige Book report for the Philadelphia region. While the Philly50 might be underwhelmed by the report's somewhat tepid view of the region's recovery - "moderate growth" was a recurring phrase - local firms might still take heart in a few hints of better days to come. Among the positives: Despite hesitancy and vacillation in other areas, consumers continued a recent buying spree when it comes to automobiles, particularly pickup trucks.
NEWS
August 28, 2013
Do you feel like you're working harder than ever, but your pay isn't keeping up? That's probably because you are - and it's not. A new study by the Economic Policy Institute shows that while the productivity of the average American worker increased nearly 75 percent between 1979 and 2012, his real income during that period grew only 5 percent. The New York Times interviewed a cashier at a KFC in Manhattan who, after eight years on the job, earns only $7.75 an hour. She hasn't had a raise since 2007.
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