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NEWS
October 21, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - State Senate President Stephen Sweeney on Monday announced a Democratic proposal to ramp up state investment in such things as early-childhood education and transportation to spur economic growth and create opportunities for "everyday New Jerseyans. " The Christie administration "has wasted the last six years on its policy of deinvestment, resulting in rising poverty and lost opportunity," Sweeney (D., Gloucester) said at a Statehouse news conference, where he was joined by other Senate Democrats.
NEWS
October 1, 2015
ISSUE | U.S. GOVERNMENT Avert a shutdown I came to Congress because I wanted to work to keep our country and economy moving forward. That is why I will not use the threat of a government shutdown to fight political battles. Anything that keeps Americans out of work, threatens to delay benefits for our veterans, and weakens our economy is not a valuable negotiating tool. In 2013, as a Chester County commissioner, I was frustrated that the federal government unnecessarily shut down for 16 days.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
HAMMONTON, N.J. - When Robert and Leyda Torres needed to relocate their country home decor shop, they wanted to move to a charming downtown with a population to support their enterprise. For about a year they had operated out of the Amish Marketplace in Vineland, a nearby Cumberland County town where the Torreses live. But that co-op-type food and retail market was set to close over the summer, so the Torreses found a narrow storefront on Bellevue Avenue here and opened Country Clutter about five months ago. "We really feel supported here by the community and by the town fathers," said Robert "Bobby" Torres, 39. ". . . It's like they really want us to succeed, so there is this unified spirit about the place that we felt as soon as we came over here and looked around for a location.
NEWS
September 16, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's five nuclear power plants contribute about $2.4 billion to the state's economy, and the industry supports 15,600 direct and indirect jobs, according to a study commissioned by the advocacy group Nuclear Matters. The state's greenhouse gas emissions would be about 52 million tons greater if fossil-fuel plants replaced the carbon-free reactors, according to a report released Monday by The Brattle Group, a global consulting firm. The state report is part of a broader campaign by Nuclear Matters to build support for retaining the nation's atomic plants, which produce about 19 percent of America's electricity.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a lot to like about the current state of the Philadelphia region's economy, particularly in the city, economist Mark Zandi said Tuesday afternoon during a panel discussion at the Union League of Philadelphia. "For the first time in a long time, it feels there's real underlying strength here," said Zandi, who is chief economist at Moody's Analytics. But the goal of the panel was to talk about what keeps the Philadelphia region from excelling economically like rival metro areas, such as Boston; Austin, Texas; and Seattle, and what can be done about it. Other members of the panel - sponsored by a nonprofit, Students Helping Students, which redistributes supplies and furnishings from wealthy schools to poor schools - were Jeremy Nowak, a consultant and former head of the William Penn Foundation, and Matt Cabrey, executive director of Select Greater Philadelphia, a group that markets the region to companies looking to relocate.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
In the case of the Toyota Highlander Hybrid, you have to pay up front if you want to save at the pump - and wear an ecological white hat. The top-of-the-line hybrid I tested, the Limited Platinum AWD, had a base price of $49,990. That's $5,850 more than a comparable gas-engine model. What you get for those extra bucks is a substantial improvement in fuel economy. The conventionally powered counterpart to the tester has EPA mileage ratings of 18 city and 24 highway. The test car is rated at 27 city and 28 highway.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Statistics in Friday's employment report from the U.S. Labor Department point to an economy humming along nicely: Employment was up by 215,000 jobs in July, with hires in nearly every major sector. The unemployment rate stayed the same at 5.3 percent. Employment numbers from previous months were revised upward, indicating more growth. But the statistics don't do much for housing supervisor Marian Gwadera, 55, who, on July 31, lost his job overseeing janitors at 2116 Chestnut St., thereby becoming one of the nation's nearly 8.3 million jobless.
NEWS
July 28, 2015
HOW DOES A CITY make progress? That's never a simple proposition, especially in a city like ours. Political will is certainly a factor (as is citizen will), but even the most disciplined political will can be no match for a strong stand from the business community. For example, much of the reform of the city's tax structure over the years would not have happened without the business community; we doubt that major events like the pope's upcoming visit or the Democratic National Convention would be a reality without their participation, either.
NEWS
July 21, 2015
PHILADELPHIA'S future is dependent on the future of its children. Most parents know that. And most parents - rich, poor and middle-class - want a better life for their children. They also know, in their gut, that the path to that better life is an education. There is a vast aspiring class of parents in this city who spend an enormous amount of time and effort seeking a good education for their kids. They join the admissions lottery at charter schools. They sometimes move to be in the catchment area of a good public school.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | BY DICK MEYER
ECONOMIC POPULISM is having a moment of celebrity these days. But so is economic gluttony. These conflicting impulses - equality vs. liberty - have been in constant competition. For some, equality of opportunity and outcomes is the ultimate political value; for others, it is liberty, which is degraded when property rights are too restricted by taxation and regulation. There is a view in both parties that voters are in an egalitarian mood. I don't buy it. The icon of economic gluttony in politics today is Donald Trump, however grotesque and trivial that may seem.
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