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Ecotourism

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NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - Ten miles from the dock and getting close to the 21/2-hour mark of a three-hour whale-watching excursion, captain Jeff Stewart needed to turn the big red Cape May Whale Watcher around and head toward the shoreline if the boat was to make it back on schedule. But Stewart, who has been operating such trips for more than 40 years so tourists can get an up-close look at marine creatures, wasn't quite ready to give up. Neither were the passengers. Sure, some marine mammals had already been spotted that day - including a "super pod" of hundreds of bottlenose dolphin.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anyplace else, it's a smelly garbage dump. But now, in Bucks County, it's also . . . an eco-adventure! Yesterday, Bucks County tourism officials unveiled a publication designed to attract nature-minded East Coast tourists to an area that has retained a reputation as a bucolic escape from Philadelphia, despite waves of housing developments and the recent rapid growth of a local trash-disposal industry. Calling "ecotourism" the hottest trend in the trade since the budget motel, county officials say the publication will put Bucks County at the forefront of the ecotourism movement and is among the first of its kind.
NEWS
July 2, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILDWOOD CREST - It's Day 70 of the gulf oil spill, and the pontoon boat the Skimmer is being steered from the lush, green salt marsh in Jarvis Sound, where passengers have just witnessed the splendor of hundreds of nesting osprey, laughing gulls, and American oyster catchers. Ginny Powell, the craft's captain, launches into her usual talk about the importance of protecting the wetlands - a kind of nursery for many ocean animal and plant species - and, new this season, the toll the BP oil spill will have on the Gulf of Mexico and its estuaries.
NEWS
November 1, 2005 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It will take more than a trek through the forest to get travelers Bill and Karen Wheeler to vacation in the New Jersey Pinelands. The Washington state couple, vacationing recently in Philadelphia, said they would cross the Delaware River for New Jersey's forests, but "there's got to be more to it than trees and twigs," Bill Wheeler said. Indeed, there already is. Visitors to the Pinelands can kayak, camp, hike, bird-watch, even take tours about local legends such as the Jersey Devil.
NEWS
November 1, 1993 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Russell Adams has hiked through the Amazon jungle to launch a canoe onto a small lake in search of the alligator-like caiman. He and his wife, Faith, have journeyed to the Galapagos to see - but not touch - the endangered creatures living on those sun-baked islands. Last year, the Reading couple visited an archaeological dig in Sayil, a Mayan ceremonial center near the ruins at Uxmal in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. No Jersey Shore vacations for these folks. "I want to see these things while they still exist," Russell Adams said.
NEWS
October 9, 1997 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a continuing quest to make this city a vacation destination for adults and children, gamblers and non-gaming tourists, officials have started work on a $4 million jewel to cash in on ecotourism as the fastest growing travel trend. Ground was broken Monday on a fanciful-looking three-story, 14,000-square-foot Marine Life Education Center, which will become the centerpiece of historic Gardners Basin Waterfront Park. With $3.2 million being provided by the state Casino Reinvestment Development Authority and the rest by the Atlantic City Historic Waterfront Foundation and Atlantic City, the center is expected to offer sea life and "touch tank" exhibits, boat cruises, and other marine expeditions through the back bays and the open waters of the Atlantic Ocean around Absecon Island.
NEWS
September 30, 2005 | By Carol J. Suplee
In the vast region known as the Pinelands, ecotourism increasingly is being promoted as a way to improve the economy and protect the environment. People are encouraged to visit and learn about the wildlife, waterways, trees and flowers. South Jersey clearly has the "eco" component in abundance. The Pinelands, also known as the Pine Barrens, encompasses about 1.4 million acres, including 1.1 million within the Pinelands National Reserve created by Congress in 1978. The acidic, sandy soil holds 17 trillion gallons of pure water and supports an ecosystem of rare plants and animals.
NEWS
May 22, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SANDY HOOK, N.J. - Wildwood's the winner! The venerable Cape May County vacation destination is the victor in the state's first Top 10 Beaches Survey, the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium announced this afternoon. South Jersey beach towns swamped their northern competition in the contest. Placing second in the overall category was Wildwood Crest, followed by Ocean City, North Wildwood, Cape May, Asbury Park, Avalon, Point Pleasant Beach, Beach Haven and Stone Harbor.
NEWS
April 25, 2005
Tribute to actress was great - except for a slip The commentary about Jilline Ringle by Debra Donahue and Carol Suplee was well-written and moving ("A hearty act to follow," April 1). I never had the pleasure of seeing Ms. Ringle, but I have often read about her and regret her untimely passing. However, as a retired editor, I'm disturbed by apparent misinformation and would like to set the record straight. The authors quote Philadelphia writer-composer Michael Ogborn (whom my husband and I have met several times)
NEWS
February 13, 2005 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Soon motor coaches could be rumbling through the Pinelands, taking tourists to the edge of a scarlet cranberry bog or to paths leading to ghost towns tucked into a pygmy pine forest. South Jersey tourism officials and marketers have joined together to finesse the Pinelands into a destination or, at the very least, make it a stop on a trip from the Philadelphia area to Atlantic City. At a tourism summit Jan. 31, more than 90 state, regional and local officials, marketing representatives, small-business owners, hoteliers, conservationists, field trip leaders, and others met in the mess hall of the YMCA Camp Ockanickon in Medford to exchange ideas.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - Ten miles from the dock and getting close to the 21/2-hour mark of a three-hour whale-watching excursion, captain Jeff Stewart needed to turn the big red Cape May Whale Watcher around and head toward the shoreline if the boat was to make it back on schedule. But Stewart, who has been operating such trips for more than 40 years so tourists can get an up-close look at marine creatures, wasn't quite ready to give up. Neither were the passengers. Sure, some marine mammals had already been spotted that day - including a "super pod" of hundreds of bottlenose dolphin.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
When Crawford Hill was a biology teacher at Episcopal Academy, his core pedagogical principle was to "give pause" - to encourage students to stop, look, pay attention, "to see things through a new lens about themselves and the world around them. " In 1999, Hill led a dozen students on a two-week trip to Costa Rica. It was, he says, "a life-changing experience for them and for me. " The Costa Rica trip became a yearly ritual for Hill and students. In 2010, after 35 years, Hill, 62, retired from the classroom, though he is still very much a teacher.
TRAVEL
December 9, 2013 | By Eric Vohr, For The Inquirer
ISLA BASTIMENTOS, Panama - Known for pristine white sand beaches, unspoiled lush green jungles, and tiny red poison dart frogs, Isla Bastimentos has become one of Panama's top ecotourism destinations. Located in the archipelago Bocas del Toro on the northwest Caribbean coast, this magical island has just the right balance of development and wild natural beauty. It's tastefully nestled into the relatively untamed landscape, and you will find an eclectic selection of beach and jungle accommodations ranging from primitive huts to luxury villas.
TRAVEL
October 9, 2011 | By Brian Wright O'Connor, For The Inquirer
MANUEL ANTONIO, Costa Rica - The afternoon rains long gone, the beach crowd at Playa Espadilla sits back to watch the liquid golds and purples of the Pacific sunset spread across the sky. Surfers catch the last curls of the day breaking toward the crescent-shaped cove. The snowbirds who flock to this resort along Costa Rica's central Pacific coast won't be here for months. There's plenty of room - and plenty of bargains - in local hotels, inns, and restaurants for travelers who don't mind dodging a shower or two during the region's May-to-December rainy season.
NEWS
July 2, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILDWOOD CREST - It's Day 70 of the gulf oil spill, and the pontoon boat the Skimmer is being steered from the lush, green salt marsh in Jarvis Sound, where passengers have just witnessed the splendor of hundreds of nesting osprey, laughing gulls, and American oyster catchers. Ginny Powell, the craft's captain, launches into her usual talk about the importance of protecting the wetlands - a kind of nursery for many ocean animal and plant species - and, new this season, the toll the BP oil spill will have on the Gulf of Mexico and its estuaries.
NEWS
May 22, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SANDY HOOK, N.J. - Wildwood's the winner! The venerable Cape May County vacation destination is the victor in the state's first Top 10 Beaches Survey, the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium announced this afternoon. South Jersey beach towns swamped their northern competition in the contest. Placing second in the overall category was Wildwood Crest, followed by Ocean City, North Wildwood, Cape May, Asbury Park, Avalon, Point Pleasant Beach, Beach Haven and Stone Harbor.
NEWS
May 11, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ballots are in. And the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium is guarding the results as if it were PricewaterhouseCoopers on Oscar night. Will the winner of the state's first "Best Beach" contest - to be revealed May 22 at a news conference heralding Memorial Day weekend - rekindle that old North Jersey-South Jersey rivalry? Is one of the soft-sanded strands favored by Philadelphia-area visitors in Atlantic or Cape May County the "it" beach of 2008? Could Asbury Park, in Monmouth County, have rallied the north's Springsteen faithful and blown away the competition?
NEWS
December 9, 2005 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Club Med it's not, but two Arcadia University professors will be developing a "high-end ecotourism operation" on an African island where they have been working to save endangered primates. The ExxonMobil Foundation, the charitable arm of the oil giant, awarded a $384,000 grant to Arcadia to develop the tourism project on Bioko Island, part of the West African nation of Equatorial Guinea. The grant also will pay to develop a research station and animal sanctuary on the island.
NEWS
November 1, 2005 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It will take more than a trek through the forest to get travelers Bill and Karen Wheeler to vacation in the New Jersey Pinelands. The Washington state couple, vacationing recently in Philadelphia, said they would cross the Delaware River for New Jersey's forests, but "there's got to be more to it than trees and twigs," Bill Wheeler said. Indeed, there already is. Visitors to the Pinelands can kayak, camp, hike, bird-watch, even take tours about local legends such as the Jersey Devil.
NEWS
September 30, 2005 | By Carol J. Suplee
In the vast region known as the Pinelands, ecotourism increasingly is being promoted as a way to improve the economy and protect the environment. People are encouraged to visit and learn about the wildlife, waterways, trees and flowers. South Jersey clearly has the "eco" component in abundance. The Pinelands, also known as the Pine Barrens, encompasses about 1.4 million acres, including 1.1 million within the Pinelands National Reserve created by Congress in 1978. The acidic, sandy soil holds 17 trillion gallons of pure water and supports an ecosystem of rare plants and animals.
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