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Ed Rendell

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NEWS
November 5, 2002 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
THE Daily News is not the only media outlet assuming that Ed Rendell will win today's gubernatorial race, although it was the only one to say so out loud, which should surprise no one. Two weeks ago, I spoke with a reporter from the nation's leading political magazine. Its upcoming cover story will be on the new governors elected this week. Apparently, this election may yield the biggest crop of new state chief executives in memory. The story revolves around Ed Rendell, because everyone assumes he'll win, and because he's expected to be the best-known of the new governors.
NEWS
October 30, 2006
WHEN ED RENDELL took office as only the sixth Democratic governor in Pennsylvania in 100 years, he surely wasn't expecting his path to be strewn with roses. Republicans dominated the Legislature, and they rarely show a soft spot for Philadelphia. Still, it was clear Rendell wasn't prepared for the bruising battle over his first budget. When the budget finally passed after a grinding nine-month standoff, it gave Rendell only a little of the education spending he wanted, and none of the economic stimulus or property-tax relief he had campaigned on. The state deficit was then $2 billion.
NEWS
April 19, 2002
KATE Michelman and Leslie Anastasio (OpEd, April 9) are right on Ed Rendell's being the only choice for those who support the rights granted to women under Roe vs. Wade. A woman's right to choose hinges on the precarious 5-4 bloc in the U.S. Supreme Court. Even if that bloc remains intact, who's to say that our conservative state legislature will not attempt to pass further restrictions? Arlene Lee, Holmes, Pa. It is unusual in a primary for Democrats to have such a stark contrast in candidates as Bob Casey Jr. vs. Ed Rendell this year.
NEWS
May 2, 2002
AFTER SEVEN YEARS of Tom Ridge and one of Mark Schweiker - and the Republican philosophy of the less government the better - where does the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania stand? Right near the bottom in chart after chart comparing the commonwealth to other big states in the vital areas of jobs, population growth and education. Come the general election in November, Pennsylvania needs at least one gubernatorial candidate who will provide bold, visionary leadership. Someone who sees Pennsylvania not only for what it is, but for what it can be. In the Democratic primary for governor, only one candidate fills the bill: Ed Rendell.
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | By DEBBIE M. PRICE, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Maria Gallagher contributed to this report.)
The dreary day after found Edward G. Rendell back in his shabby campaign office, littered with half-empty jugs of white wine, paper cups and tattered Rendell-for-Mayor posters, fielding phone calls and pronouncing the battle well fought. He was discouraged, disappointed, tired, drained, but not, he said, bitter or regretful. "We ran a good campaign, a great campaign, and I wouldn't have done anything differently," Rendell said yesterday. "I don't think that much went wrong.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | BY TOM MAZZA
In little more than seven months, the most effective big-city mayor in America will step down. I ask Ed Rendell and his well-heeled supporters to pave the way for him to take on a more daunting challenge than he confronted eight years ago. Rendell should become point man in a nationwide campaign to enact the strictest gun-control legislation in the free world. Let the movers and shakers of Philadelphia who have contributed tens of millions of dollars to Rendell's campaigns step up one more time and put up the seed money to fund an organization whose goal is to disarm America.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
Ed Rendell, the former district attorney who wants to be the next mayor of this woebegone city, keeps saying that nobody cares anymore, that nothing works in Philadelphia, that people have lost faith in City Hall. He said this several times during the televised debate with Wilson Goode, and he said it a half dozen times on the campaign hustings one evening last week. He said it so many times that I think he might really believe it - and not without good reason. He started out a night of campaign appearances the other evening at Messiah Lutheran Church, at Broad and Roosevelt Boulevard.
NEWS
December 26, 2002
SUBJECT: The Sam Katz candidacy. It is clear that the city regressed significantly after the era of Ed Rendell. It must have broken his heart to throw support to John Street knowing that he didn't have the stuff to sustain the Rendell momentum. Street sent a clear message in his opposition to tax cuts and his handling of the Convention Center union mess that he is merely a caretaker and not the visionary Philly needs to continue what Rendell started. Had it been Street rather than Rendell facing financial crisis, Philadelphia would certainly have been bankrupt by now. Even though Rendell temporarily staved off the demise of Philly, a second Street term could accelerate the regression begun in his first term.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Those were the days. In this autumn of Philadelphia's discontent, with the schools crippled, a mayor who seems more technocrat than visionary, and a ho-hum field of possible successors, the city turns its lonely eyes to . . . Ed Rendell. A few business and opinion leaders have been asking: wouldn't it be great if Rendell were to run in 2015 for mayor of Philadelphia, the job he held from 1991 to 2000? Back then, Big Things got done. The city was rescued from the brink. Public pools reopened.
NEWS
November 8, 2002 | By DON HARRISON
HE WAS A pretty good mayor, and he'll probably be a pretty good governor - but Ed Rendell does not walk on water. Convinced that many, if not most, of the world's ills are based on unrealistic expectations, I think it's necessary to remind Pennsylvanians that some problems are beyond even a governor's powers, and I don't mean just natural disasters. The economy, for example, depends on many variables. There's no way that our state, no matter how capable its governor is, can avoid reflecting the global fluctuations that determine hard times or recovery.
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NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
During his years as Ed Rendell's deputy mayor, Herbert Vederman refused to collect a city paycheck, living instead off the millions he made from his family's retail clothing empire. But recently, federal prosecutors say, he benefited from his government connections in other ways - by funneling cash to U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah in return for official favors from the Philadelphia Democratic congressman. Prosecutors said Wednesday that Fattah pressed tirelessly to get Vederman a federal post, going so far as to hand-deliver a letter to President Obama in fall 2010 asking him to make Vederman a U.S. ambassador.
NEWS
July 21, 2015
LET'S TAKE a peek inside Katie McGinty's tug of war. We know there is one. Otherwise she'd simply say, "I am not a candidate for U.S. Senate. " That would end speculation that started in May, after Montco Commissioner Josh Shapiro said he won't run against Republican Pat Toomey next year. So, just the fact that McGinty's not talking shows, as one source close to her put it, she's "seriously, seriously considering. " She needs to make a decision soon because as Gov. Wolf's chief of staff she's a distraction to the many distractions keeping the governor and GOP lawmakers from agreeing on a now three-week-late budget.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
While Meryl Levitz was standing gamely with the politicians and her fellow hospitality-industry executives at a news conference in the Mayor's Reception Room in City Hall on Thursday, her staff was already busy digging out old playbooks. "I hope they're already working," she said. The conference detailed a massive but welcome challenge for Philadelphia and its leadership: to be fully prepared for July 2016, when the Democrats hold their national convention here. Many of the strategies, and many of the individuals who created and employed those strategies, will be a direct repeat from 2000, when the Republican National Convention was in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's biggest hurdle in securing the 2016 Democratic National Convention was convincing the selection committee it could come up with the money, organizers said. Now that the gig belongs to the city, it comes with an $84 million fund-raising challenge. Amid celebration Thursday were promises Philadelphia can bring in the money, even with a concurrent fund-raising push to raise $45 million for Pope Francis' visit in September. Mayor Nutter said the plan was to rely on federal and private dollars and use no city funds for the weeklong political fest.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's official: The Democrats are coming to town. The Democratic National Committee's announcement Thursday that Philadelphia will host the party's 2016 presidential nominating convention - beating out Brooklyn, N.Y., and Columbus, Ohio - caps a yearlong campaign during which the city's marquee political names set aside their differences and pulled together as a team. The decision means Philadelphia will double down on national, even global, attention in the next 18 months, with Pope Francis visiting in September and the Democrats convening here in July 2016.
NEWS
November 25, 2014
ISSUE | EDUCATION Impressive resumé As a parent and a retired teacher, I felt student Natalie Hackett Abulhawa's frustration in applying to college and in the inequity of the system ("Daunting start to college application process," Nov. 20). I agree with every point she made. My hope is that she can use her opinion piece as her essay during her college application process. |Vivian Wolfson, West Chester, gwily7@verizon.net Wolf at chalkboard When Ed Rendell served as governor, I was chair of the state House Education Committee, drafting the legislation that provided for smaller class sizes across the state, all-day kindergarten, funding for quality preschool programs, and other education initiatives that Rendell embraced, signed into law, and included in his budgets ("Corbett campaign lied about Rendell's record," Nov. 14)
NEWS
September 30, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe the electrical problems that delayed Sunday's memorial service for Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Tony Auth were meant as metaphor. The power went out, but the light never dimmed. "In your life, Tony Auth, you welcomed the stranger, spoke up for the outcast, punctured the pretensions of the hypocrite," said longtime colleague Chris Satullo, quoting what he imagined God saying to Auth, a not particularly devout new arrival at heaven's gate. "You were devoted to those who loved you and you were disinclined to despise those who did not," Satullo said.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Thomas Fitzgerald, and Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writers
Standing in a beer garden across from the Liberty Bell, the city's leaders vowed Thursday to lure the Democratic National Convention to Philadelphia and announced their slogan: "Let's make history again. " Ed Rendell, the former mayor and governor, would not say whether that was a sly reference to the candidate he supports - Democratic front-runner Hillary Rodham Clinton, who could be the first woman to win a major party's nomination for president. "You can work on figuring that out," he said with a smile.
NEWS
June 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON & MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writers morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HE MOVED FREELY in the worlds of business, government, education and journalism, and those who knew him in all those worlds mourned Lewis Katz yesterday. His philanthropic activities were nearly the stuff of legend, including a $25 million gift last year to his alma mater Temple University, which will name its medical school after him. It was just a few weeks ago that Katz spoke at Temple's commencement ceremony. The speech was, according to Temple board of trustees chairman Patrick J. O'Connor, "among the most inspiring ever given.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
Gunsmoke rules Growing up in the 1950s, I watched a lot of TV westerns where the marshal would ride in, rid the town of villains, and save the day (" 'Nuclear option' looms over teacher talks," March 24). It's the same each time Philadelphia gets a new school superintendent, and look who William R. Hite Jr. has decided are the villains: Apparently, the villains are the rapacious, avaricious teachers and their union. Hite plans to impose work rules. But teachers are not the villains of this story.
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