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Ed Van Impe

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SPORTS
April 9, 1993 | by Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
Valeri Kharlamov crumpled to the Spectrum ice one more time, as the crowd roared its approval. The scoreboard video screens evoked one of the most famous scenes in franchise history last night, a moment that helped define the Flyers. Kharlamov had his head down, watching the puck, when Ed Van Impe, a brick wall of a defenseman, bulldozed him from the blind side. Kharlamov lay on the ice, stunned, and the Soviet Red Army team briefly left the ice in protest of the Flyers' rough treatment in that Cold War-charged exhibition of Jan. 11, 1976.
SPORTS
May 28, 2010 | by Chuck Bausman
The 1974 and '75 Flyers won back-to-back Stanley Cups and captivated the city. The Broad Street Bullies will live forever in Philadelphia, much as coach Fred Shero promised the players that if they won the deciding Game 6 over Boston in '74, they would walk together forever. Given the remarkable way this season's Flyers have advanced to the finals, the Daily News asked members of the 1974-75 teams to talk about their counterparts. On this page, owner Ed Snider talks about how he has changed, his champions and the team he hopes will join them in Philadelphia sports lore.
SPORTS
January 11, 2011 | By FRANK SERAVALLI, seravaf@phillynews.com
PLAYING IT BACK, like a train wreck in slow motion, Ed Van Impe can vividly remember the hit that made the Soviets fold like a tent. The date: 35 years ago today, at the Spectrum, with the two-time defending Stanley Cup champion Flyers facing the Red Army team in the final game of the 1976 exhibition Super Series. Van Impe darted from the penalty box, about midway through the first period, and watched the Soviets' breakout develop as he got a glimpse of his favorite kind of pass.
SPORTS
November 8, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the late Fred Shero is inducted Monday into hockey's Hall of Fame in Toronto, 15 of his former Flyers players - 14 of whom played on at least one of the franchise's two Stanley Cup champions - will attend the ceremony. Shero, who died in 1990 at age 65, coached the Flyers for seven years in the 1970s before joining the New York Rangers. He will be inducted in the builder's category. Ed Snider, chairman of the Flyers' parent company, Comcast-Spectacor, is paying for the ex-players' expenses, and those who live in this area will be aboard his private plane en route to Toronto.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everett Patrick Borghesani, 79, an oral surgeon who patched up Flyers players for close to three decades, died Friday, Aug. 30, at Bryn Mawr Hospital following a long battle with kidney disease. Dr. Borghesani worked for the hockey club for 28 seasons, attending home games and traveling with the team during playoffs. In addition to stitching up hundreds of skaters so they could return to the ice, he treated players who sustained dramatic and, in some cases, life-threatening injuries.
NEWS
May 4, 2010 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
Way back in '67, Ed Snider made the rounds of the city's banks, looking for some money to bring professional hockey to town. It was a ridiculously low amount by today's standards, $2 million. "One banker fell asleep," Snider recounts Tuesday night at 10 in HBO's Broad Street Bullies, a trip down Memory Lane, frequently punctuated by fisticuffs and body blows, that every Philadelphian should enjoy. "Hockey will never make it in Philadelphia," another banker said. Seven years later, two million people lined Broad Street to celebrate the Flyers' first Stanley Cup win. Broad Street Bullies (the name was shortened by Bulletin copy editor Pete Cafone in a 1973 headline over an article by Jack Chevalier that referred to the Bullies of Broad Street)
SPORTS
January 4, 2009 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Flyers have had 16 different captains in their 41-year history. They have come in many shapes, sizes and toothless grins. Some of the captains were hardy souls. No-frills, net-clearing players. Ed Van Impe comes to mind. Some of the captains were physical on the ice and vocal off it. They were unafraid to lash the team, when needed, in the media. Hello, Derian Hatcher. Some of the captains weren't dominating players, but stood up for their teammates with their physical play - and didn't shy away from a fight or four.
SPORTS
March 23, 1988 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer
It is fitting, since Bobby Clarke and Bernie Parent led the Flyers to their two Stanley Cups, that they should be the first two inductees into the Flyers' Hall of Fame. Neither Clarke nor Parent are strangers to halls of fame. They are the only two players from NHL expansion teams in the Hockey Hall of Fame. While membership in the Hockey Hall of Fame carries more notoriety, being the original inductees into the new Flyers' Hall is a tribute to the respect that Clarke and Parent have brought to the franchise.
SPORTS
May 28, 2010 | by Bernard Fernandez
ASK RETIRED Flyers defenseman Ed Van Impe if he sees any of himself in the team's current standout backliner, Chris Pronger, and he offers a qualified yes. "Probably a little bit," Van Impe, 70, said from his home in British Columbia. "I used to take pride in my defensive play, in taking care of my own end and clearing out the front of the net so the goaltender can see the puck. Chris is like that, too. " But Van Impe, a member of the Flyers' 1974 and '75 Stanley Cup championship teams, is honest enough and realistic enough that he won't say that Pronger's abilities are a mirror image of his own. "Believe me, Chris Pronger is light years ahead of me in terms of overall ability is concerned," Van Impe said.
SPORTS
May 28, 2010
Ed Snider and the Flyers faithful would love to see this list grow by one. If the Flyers somehow manage to win the holy grail of hockey this year after barely squeaking into the playoffs and with a goaltender they claimed off waivers at midseason, the Cup clincher will have to check in at No. 3. But until then, here's one person's list: Rick MacLeish tipped in a Moose Dupont wrist shot, then the Flyers dogged the Bruins all over the ice and...
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SPORTS
May 20, 2014
BOB CLARKE was the captain and driving force of the Flyers' 1974 and '75 Stanley Cup champions. A three-time Hart Trophy winner as the NHL's Most Valuable Player, he also was a two-time, first-team NHL All-Star and the Flyers' all-time leading scorer. A Hockey Hall of Famer, Clarke later served as Flyers team president and general manager. Now 64, Clarke is a Flyers senior vice president. He spoke with Bill Fleischman, the Daily News' Flyers beat writer when the team won its only Stanley Cups, from his winter home in Sarasota, Fla. Q: It's the 40th anniversary of the Flyers' Stanley Cup-clinching victory over Boston at the Spectrum.
SPORTS
November 8, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the late Fred Shero is inducted Monday into hockey's Hall of Fame in Toronto, 15 of his former Flyers players - 14 of whom played on at least one of the franchise's two Stanley Cup champions - will attend the ceremony. Shero, who died in 1990 at age 65, coached the Flyers for seven years in the 1970s before joining the New York Rangers. He will be inducted in the builder's category. Ed Snider, chairman of the Flyers' parent company, Comcast-Spectacor, is paying for the ex-players' expenses, and those who live in this area will be aboard his private plane en route to Toronto.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everett Patrick Borghesani, 79, an oral surgeon who patched up Flyers players for close to three decades, died Friday, Aug. 30, at Bryn Mawr Hospital following a long battle with kidney disease. Dr. Borghesani worked for the hockey club for 28 seasons, attending home games and traveling with the team during playoffs. In addition to stitching up hundreds of skaters so they could return to the ice, he treated players who sustained dramatic and, in some cases, life-threatening injuries.
SPORTS
January 11, 2011 | By FRANK SERAVALLI, seravaf@phillynews.com
PLAYING IT BACK, like a train wreck in slow motion, Ed Van Impe can vividly remember the hit that made the Soviets fold like a tent. The date: 35 years ago today, at the Spectrum, with the two-time defending Stanley Cup champion Flyers facing the Red Army team in the final game of the 1976 exhibition Super Series. Van Impe darted from the penalty box, about midway through the first period, and watched the Soviets' breakout develop as he got a glimpse of his favorite kind of pass.
SPORTS
May 28, 2010 | by Bernard Fernandez
ASK RETIRED Flyers defenseman Ed Van Impe if he sees any of himself in the team's current standout backliner, Chris Pronger, and he offers a qualified yes. "Probably a little bit," Van Impe, 70, said from his home in British Columbia. "I used to take pride in my defensive play, in taking care of my own end and clearing out the front of the net so the goaltender can see the puck. Chris is like that, too. " But Van Impe, a member of the Flyers' 1974 and '75 Stanley Cup championship teams, is honest enough and realistic enough that he won't say that Pronger's abilities are a mirror image of his own. "Believe me, Chris Pronger is light years ahead of me in terms of overall ability is concerned," Van Impe said.
SPORTS
May 28, 2010 | by Chuck Bausman
The 1974 and '75 Flyers won back-to-back Stanley Cups and captivated the city. The Broad Street Bullies will live forever in Philadelphia, much as coach Fred Shero promised the players that if they won the deciding Game 6 over Boston in '74, they would walk together forever. Given the remarkable way this season's Flyers have advanced to the finals, the Daily News asked members of the 1974-75 teams to talk about their counterparts. On this page, owner Ed Snider talks about how he has changed, his champions and the team he hopes will join them in Philadelphia sports lore.
SPORTS
May 28, 2010
Ed Snider and the Flyers faithful would love to see this list grow by one. If the Flyers somehow manage to win the holy grail of hockey this year after barely squeaking into the playoffs and with a goaltender they claimed off waivers at midseason, the Cup clincher will have to check in at No. 3. But until then, here's one person's list: Rick MacLeish tipped in a Moose Dupont wrist shot, then the Flyers dogged the Bruins all over the ice and...
NEWS
May 4, 2010 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
Way back in '67, Ed Snider made the rounds of the city's banks, looking for some money to bring professional hockey to town. It was a ridiculously low amount by today's standards, $2 million. "One banker fell asleep," Snider recounts Tuesday night at 10 in HBO's Broad Street Bullies, a trip down Memory Lane, frequently punctuated by fisticuffs and body blows, that every Philadelphian should enjoy. "Hockey will never make it in Philadelphia," another banker said. Seven years later, two million people lined Broad Street to celebrate the Flyers' first Stanley Cup win. Broad Street Bullies (the name was shortened by Bulletin copy editor Pete Cafone in a 1973 headline over an article by Jack Chevalier that referred to the Bullies of Broad Street)
SPORTS
January 4, 2009 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Flyers have had 16 different captains in their 41-year history. They have come in many shapes, sizes and toothless grins. Some of the captains were hardy souls. No-frills, net-clearing players. Ed Van Impe comes to mind. Some of the captains were physical on the ice and vocal off it. They were unafraid to lash the team, when needed, in the media. Hello, Derian Hatcher. Some of the captains weren't dominating players, but stood up for their teammates with their physical play - and didn't shy away from a fight or four.
SPORTS
November 14, 2001 | BY STAN HOCHMAN For the Daily News
Former Flyer Jim Watson tells the story about Ted Harris, traded from Minnesota to Detroit, back in the day. Harris joins the Red Wings and asks his new teammate, Bugsy Watson, how the Wings move the puck out of their own end. "Any bleeping way we can," Watson tells him. In those days hockey was described as one long, broken play. The emphasis was on strength and using your stick to crowbar the puck loose in the corners. Then, Fred Shero arrived with his "fil-ums" and his Russian theories and his "System," guiding the Flyers through most of the 1970s.
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