IN THE NEWS

Ed

NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Friday that Pennsylvania does the worst job in the nation of funding low-income school districts. "The state of Pennsylvania is 50th, dead last, in terms of the inequality between how wealthy school districts are funded and poor districts," Duncan said. Recent Education Department figures show that the amount spent on each student in Pennsylvania's poorest school districts is 33 percent less than the amount spent on each student in the wealthier districts.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ed Sabol, 98, the passionate Philadelphian whose obsession with home movies developed into a business that helped transform professional football into America's preeminent sport, died Monday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. The man everyone called "Big Ed" founded NFL Films in 1964, just two years after he bought the rights to the 1962 NFL championship for $5,000. He headed that company, now headquartered in Mount Laurel, from 1964 to 1995, during which time NFL Films won 52 Emmy Awards.
SPORTS
January 30, 2015
Check out more Super Bowl prop bets from the Daily News' Mike Kern here. COLLEAGUE Mike Kern stumbled on an interesting - and very appropriate - stat. There have been 48 Super Bowls. The opening coin toss has landed on heads 24 times and tails 24 times. That's quite symbolic for those who try to make money picking this game. Tom Brady's offense vs. that red-hot Seahawks defense. Heads or tails. So, with that, prop bets with fake money. * I'm taking the Seahawks in another part of this paper, so my first move is to lay the $110 to win $100 that they will score first.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
WHEN ADRIAN Rios arrived in Philadelphia nearly four years ago to begin his studies on the ivy-clad campus of the University of Pennsylvania, the East Los Angeles native was increasingly drawn to political issues, from the plight of Palestinians to a labor fight involving Penn's cafeteria workers. But most of his classmates stayed on the sidelines. That's why it was a life-altering experience - "exciting and nerve-racking," he recalls - last month when he found himself amid about 100 student protesters lying on the floor of a large, heated tent in a protest at Penn president Amy Gutmann's house.
REAL_ESTATE
December 1, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
When you ask residential developers in Philadelphia who their target audience is, the typical response is "eds and meds," meaning those who work in education and health care. Both seem impervious to the economic stresses and strains that affect other business sectors, so developers who focus on building for-sale and rental units near medical centers and universities are not taking great risks. Health care is the fastest growing because America is aging rapidly and demand for services is increasing.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
As security guard Carlos Cadiz walked down the sixth-floor hallway around 2:30 a.m. making his nightly rounds, the air around him started to feel cooler, denser. He fought back an overwhelming feeling that someone was striding along with him, close but not quite touching his arm. Suddenly, a locked door leading to the old jail started rattling violently. "I just ran for the elevator," said Cadiz, a guard at Camden City Hall. "I got out of there fast as I could. " This month, with the help of 10 paranormal investigators who blanketed the sixth floor with spirit-detection technology, Cadiz was introduced to his walking mate.
NEWS
November 6, 2014
YOUR PAPER recently published an oped by Chad Dion Lassiter, the President of Black Men at Penn School of Social Work, that called real-estate development company Templetown Realty and Temple University, "the new Jim Crow. " The objective of Mr. Lassiter's letter is to raise awareness of the allegedly heavy-handed tactics used by the realty company and Temple to displace the poor African-American community that surrounds the campus, and to call for a campaign of civil disobedience against the university's expansion efforts.
NEWS
November 1, 2014
  LOGAN COHEN, 24, of Malvern, is co-founder and COO of ed-tech startup Kudzoo. The company built a mobile app that rewards students, aged 13 and older, for their grades and achievements with deals and opportunities. Cohen also teaches a weekly entrepreneurship class for 14-to-16-year-olds at the Science Leadership Academy.   Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Kudzoo? A: My co-founder, Trevor Wilkins, came up with it to reward students for academic achievement. It started as discounts and deals and we wanted to see what would get kids excited and it evolved into an app. Q: The startup money?
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ed Keegan, 75, who pitched briefly with the Phillies and Kansas City Athletics after a spectacular career at Haddonfield High, died Sunday at his daughter's home in Franklinville, N.J., according to Larry Shenk, the Phillies' vice president of alumni relations. The hard-throwing righthander was signed by the Phillies in 1957 after compiling a 26-2 career record and a 0.37 ERA at Haddonfield. Two years later, Mr. Keegan made his major-league debut with the Phillies at age 20. Mr. Keegan, who stood 6-foot-3 and weighed 165 pounds, was 0-3 with a 9.00 ERA in 13 big-league games, highlighted by a strikeout of Hall of Famer Roberto Clemente.
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