IN THE NEWS

Ed

NEWS
September 1, 2015
LET'S BEGIN BY saying we agree with Gov. Wolf's belief that the way the state funds special education for students in charter schools is messed up. The formula used isn't related to actual cost. A school is given the same amount whether the child has a mild disability - say, requiring speech therapy three times a week - or is severely handicapped - a wheelchair-bound child who requires special transportation and the presence of a full-time aide. Local school districts, which have to foot the bill for special-ed students in charters, say the cost of paying this subsidy to charters imperils their own financial stability.
SPORTS
August 19, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Sunday was a good overall day for the Eagles as they opened the exhibition season with a fairly solid and injury-free win over the Indianapolis Colts, but it was also a very good day, specifically, for the 2014 draft class. The last draft controlled by Howie Roseman had some undeniable high points. Receivers Jordan Matthews and Josh Huff were contributors as rookies, as was nose tackle Beau Allen and, to a lesser degree, defensive back Jaylen Watkins. There were gaps among the draftees, however, and none bigger than first-round pick Marcus Smith, who became the poster boy of what was portrayed as a failure of the previous player-personnel department.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
This would have been a good week for Eileen and Paul J. Marmino III, their friend Cathy Barbara said. "They had put in a bid" to buy a home, she said, "and were waiting . . . to hear if it had been accepted. They were excited, because it was in Marlton, near her mom and dad. " But on Sunday morning, Eileen Lafferty Marmino, 34, of Medford, a special education science teacher at Burlington City High School, died of head trauma when the bicycle she was riding was hit by a car on Church Road near Trotter Drive in Medford, police said.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | BY MICHAEL KLEIN, Philly.com Staff Writer mklein@philly.com, 215-854-5514
ED HITZEL, 64, known for tough but fair restaurant reviews as well as an encyclopedic knowledge of the Jersey Shore restaurant and food scene, died Monday. Hitzel, who lived in Mays Landing, was stricken during dinner with friends at the Maplewood, in Hammonton, whose spaghetti he frequently raved about. His wife of 33 years, Susan, told the Press of Atlantic City that the cause was cardiac arrest. Hitzel, the Longport-raised son of an Atlantic City hotelier, rose from a copy boy in the 1970s to editing jobs at the Press , then left in the early 1990s to publish Ed Hitzel's Restaurant Magazine.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
CHAKA FATTAH has grown accustomed to the sound of footsteps. Federal prosecutors have been following the longtime Philadelphia congressman for eight years - subpoenaing his emails and congressional records, auditing his nonprofits and flipping his political confidants - as they seek to build a corruption indictment against him. Fattah, 58, has been tapping his campaign war chest to cover hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees. He's in a "safe" district, so he doesn't need the campaign money to, ya know, campaign.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
At 24, the cherubic, redheaded Ed Sheeran has shown dexterity as an artist and as a chart-topper, with a blend of folk and soul (occasionally tipped with hip-hop rhythms) with undeniable nods to American culture (example: his tune "The A-Team"). His affiliations further show his flexibility. He covered Pink Floyd's "Wish You Were Here" during the 2012 Summer Olympics. He has cowritten several hits with One Direction, and he has toured with Taylor Swift. Sheeran has also worked with drum-and-bass god Goldie and weird rapper Lupe Fiasco.
NEWS
May 29, 2015
ONE PIECE of good news this week was the $150,000 grant the MacArthur Foundation gave to the Philadelphia prison system to study ways to shrink the population in city jails. The timing couldn't be better. Council is set to deliberate a bill to purchase a tract of land near the Delaware River to build a new city jail with the stated aim of replacing the city's 90-year-old House of Correction, which houses 1,500 inmates in crowded conditions. Some are protesting the site for the prison - along an increasingly valuable and active stretch of riverfront.
SPORTS
May 20, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
THE DARKEST of clouds hovered over the Wells Fargo Center at noon yesterday, threatening a downpour of epic proportions. Inside, though, the sun's high beams were on. Accolades for a coach who has never dipped his toes into the NHL, from a first-year general manager who has never hired a head coach before. Accolades for both from an 82-year-old chairman whose very approval of it clearly indicates a mindset that is now all-in. Give the old man credit for this. Ed Snider defended the hiring of a career college coach yesterday by referencing the humble starts of Fred Shero and Mike Keenan, reminding us not only that his stewardship has not always been about hiring known quantities and former players, but also how long his tenure as head of this team has been.
NEWS
May 5, 2015
CITY CONTROLLER Alan Butkovitz calls it his "Anchor Procurement Initiative," which is a real mouthful that needs to be translated: Anchor means the large universities and teaching hospitals that anchor the city's Eds & Meds sector. Combined, these institutions spend $14 billion each year, much of it on salaries, but billions more on commodities - goods such as paper, office supplies, surgical equipment and so on. Procurement means purchasing. Each institution has a procurement department that fulfills the institution's needs by purchasing goods and services.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ed Graziano, like any astute art-school student, knows where to find the free food. "There's three stations," he said to a classmate over the whir of an exhibit opening last week at the University of the Arts. The man who once wore custom suits and $500 shoes untucked a white dress shirt from his baggy jeans. He clutched a water with lemon, grabbed from the open bar. A red ribbon attached to his name tag identified him: ARTIST . Graziano, a third-year fine arts major with a focus in sculpture, turns 51 in May. He is a graying undergraduate, a man of paradoxes.
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