IN THE NEWS

Ed

NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
CAMDEN The Camden that I encounter at the annual meeting of the Cooper's Ferry Partnership seems unfamiliar. Who are these people, I wonder as I walk around the Adventure Aquarium ballroom, where hundreds of professional folks are networking over small plates of chic eats. The theme of the event is "Rediscover Camden," and nowhere to be seen is the familiar Camden - the city cited in "worst" lists and luridly chronicled by visiting celebrity journalists. Instead, it's eds, meds, the new Campbell Soup campus, and more.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
I once asked Paul McCartney an impertinent question. Or at least it seemed so to Sir Paul, one half of the greatest and most successful pop songwriting team in history, and one quarter of the band - the Beatles - whose first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show happened 50 years ago Sunday. The query was simple: What would he have become if the Beatles had never made it out of Liverpool? His response made it clear that, in 2005, he thought it a bloody stupid question. "An underwater salvage man," he quipped.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Democrats fired an early volley in the state budget battle on Monday, accusing Gov. Corbett of decimating higher-education funding and refusing to seek input from across the aisle on how to restore deep cuts his office made in 2011. Pennsylvania Democratic Party Chairman Jim Burn, on a conference call with reporters, encouraged Corbett to restore money that was slashed in 2011, when the state's public institutions saw a 20-percent drop in funding. "Welcome both parties and both chambers in to have this conversation," Burn said in a message to the governor.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore W. Wing II, 65, of Wynnefield, a special-education teacher who also worked for the City of Philadelphia, died Tuesday, Oct. 15, at Lankenau Hospital of complications from an earlier heart attack. At the time of his death, Mr. Wing, known as Ted, was a special-education teacher at Woodrow Wilson High School in Camden. He had worked there for two years and at Camden High School for about six years. Before that, he had been vice president of government sales for Ray Communications; a deputy commissioner of public property for Philadelphia under Mayor Ed Rendell; vice president of data and voice technologies for AT&T in Bala Cynwyd; and interim manager of the African American Historical and Cultural Museum in Philadelphia through AT&T's loaned-executive program.
NEWS
October 9, 2013
THE U.S. auto industry is thriving, running its factories at triple-shift full capacity, hiring new workers. It's begging auto-parts suppliers for more product, as hiring grows all along the U.S. car-market supply chain, where millions of Americans are employed in the real economy, building and making actual things. Its workers are shopping, buying, paying taxes, funding schools and showing the effect that manufacturing jobs can have in the honest-to-God economy. Even Government Motors, otherwise known as GM, will make a handsome profit this year, and soon the feds will have sold off our stake in the bailed-out automaker, a deal now estimated to cost you, the taxpayer, $10 billion.
NEWS
September 28, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A community group has sued the city, the state, the state Department of Education and the Philadelphia School Reform Commission on behalf of special-education students who attended schools that closed in June. The suit, which was filed in Commonwealth Court in February, had sought to prevent the SRC from closing 24 schools in June on grounds that the district had failed to provide new individual learning plans for as many as 2,000 special-education students in those schools as is required by law. Representatives from the group, 7000 Villagers, said Thursday that the court has scheduled arguments in the case for Oct. 8 in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 28, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ed Rendell - 45th governor of Pennsylvania, 96th mayor of Philadelphia, former head of the Democratic National Committee - likes to lead. Now he's out front again, cochairing a task force of the D.C.-based, nonprofit Bipartisan Policy Center, traveling the country - next stop, Biloxi - and urging Congress to pass immigration reform. He took questions on the run. Question: Lawmakers are swamped: Syria, the debt ceiling, a possible shutdown of the government next week. Does immigration stand a chance?
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Those were the days. In this autumn of Philadelphia's discontent, with the schools crippled, a mayor who seems more technocrat than visionary, and a ho-hum field of possible successors, the city turns its lonely eyes to . . . Ed Rendell. A few business and opinion leaders have been asking: wouldn't it be great if Rendell were to run in 2015 for mayor of Philadelphia, the job he held from 1991 to 2000? Back then, Big Things got done. The city was rescued from the brink. Public pools reopened.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Guys hate being called cute. I imagine that Tony Braithwaite would similarly recoil from anyone dismissing his new one-man show as "enjoyable. " It's certainly not risqué. Despite the provocative title, Didn't Your Father Have This Talk With You? focuses more on the delicate, often amusing job of molding young minds. From 1994 to 2006, Braithwaite taught world religion and sex ed to freshmen at St. Joe's Prep. I initially thought he invented the curricular pairing but, like the show's structure, the first semester covered theology, the second semester sex and its eager malcontents.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
FOR THE longest time, I deluded myself into thinking that the only difference between me and a Miss America hopeful was the fact that I wore glasses. Actually, I did not wear "glasses. " I wore a portable version of the Hubble Telescope. For this reason, and this reason alone, it was clear to my adolescent self that the only aisle I'd likely be strolling down was the one at Penn Fruit. But come every Labor Day, I'd suspend reality for a few blessed hours and mentally substitute my face (including all four of my eyes)
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|