IN THE NEWS

Ed

NEWS
September 28, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A community group has sued the city, the state, the state Department of Education and the Philadelphia School Reform Commission on behalf of special-education students who attended schools that closed in June. The suit, which was filed in Commonwealth Court in February, had sought to prevent the SRC from closing 24 schools in June on grounds that the district had failed to provide new individual learning plans for as many as 2,000 special-education students in those schools as is required by law. Representatives from the group, 7000 Villagers, said Thursday that the court has scheduled arguments in the case for Oct. 8 in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 28, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ed Rendell - 45th governor of Pennsylvania, 96th mayor of Philadelphia, former head of the Democratic National Committee - likes to lead. Now he's out front again, cochairing a task force of the D.C.-based, nonprofit Bipartisan Policy Center, traveling the country - next stop, Biloxi - and urging Congress to pass immigration reform. He took questions on the run. Question: Lawmakers are swamped: Syria, the debt ceiling, a possible shutdown of the government next week. Does immigration stand a chance?
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Those were the days. In this autumn of Philadelphia's discontent, with the schools crippled, a mayor who seems more technocrat than visionary, and a ho-hum field of possible successors, the city turns its lonely eyes to . . . Ed Rendell. A few business and opinion leaders have been asking: wouldn't it be great if Rendell were to run in 2015 for mayor of Philadelphia, the job he held from 1991 to 2000? Back then, Big Things got done. The city was rescued from the brink. Public pools reopened.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Guys hate being called cute. I imagine that Tony Braithwaite would similarly recoil from anyone dismissing his new one-man show as "enjoyable. " It's certainly not risqué. Despite the provocative title, Didn't Your Father Have This Talk With You? focuses more on the delicate, often amusing job of molding young minds. From 1994 to 2006, Braithwaite taught world religion and sex ed to freshmen at St. Joe's Prep. I initially thought he invented the curricular pairing but, like the show's structure, the first semester covered theology, the second semester sex and its eager malcontents.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
FOR THE longest time, I deluded myself into thinking that the only difference between me and a Miss America hopeful was the fact that I wore glasses. Actually, I did not wear "glasses. " I wore a portable version of the Hubble Telescope. For this reason, and this reason alone, it was clear to my adolescent self that the only aisle I'd likely be strolling down was the one at Penn Fruit. But come every Labor Day, I'd suspend reality for a few blessed hours and mentally substitute my face (including all four of my eyes)
NEWS
September 7, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the start of school just days away, parents and advocates for children with autism, physical disabilities, or other special needs are becoming increasingly concerned that the Philadelphia School District will not be able to adequately educate those students because of staff and budget cutbacks. A group of parents met Thursday with officials from the nonprofit Public Interest Law Center in Philadelphia to learn what steps to take if they believe their child's school is failing to provide education as required by law. "We want parents to know how to file a complaint immediately," said Helen Gym, cofounder of Parents United for Public Education and a public school parent.
NEWS
August 25, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
SCRANTON - President Obama was on the road Friday afternoon to wrap up a two-day bus tour of colleges in upstate New York with a speech to students at Lackawanna College here. Obama embarked on his bus tour during a tough political time: his approval rating below break-even, foreign policy crises in Syria and Egypt and the prospect of brinksmanship with a hostile Congress over the budget and the national debt ceiling in the fall. With its blue-collar roots, Scranton is usually friendly Democratic territory.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Margaret Hunter Jordan, 86, formerly of Hainesport, a Browns Mills physical education teacher for 16 years, died of cancer Sunday, Aug. 11, at the Wiley Christian Retirement Community in Marlton. At Ursinus College, Mrs. Jordan was "a basketball player, varsity all four years," daughter Karen said. "She was kind of a jock. " Born in Yeadon, she earned a bachelor's degree in physical education at Ursinus in 1948, and for a year coached girls' sports at a public school in Frenchtown, N.J. She was married in 1950.
NEWS
August 13, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Ann McConnell, 50, of Cinnaminson, a former special-education teacher in Burlington City, died of a rare muscle-disabling disease Wednesday, Aug. 7, at her home. Miss McConnell graduated from Archbishop Ryan High School in Northeast Philadelphia and earned a bachelor's degree in special education at what is now Rowan University in 1987. Her 20-year teaching career in the Burlington City School District was spent at Capt. James Lawrence Elementary School and then Wilbur Watts Intermediate School, her brother, Jerry, said.
SPORTS
July 18, 2013
BIO BOX Name: Ed Pinckney Born: March 27, 1963 (age 50), in Bronx, N.Y. College: Villanova; was a member of the underdog Wildcats team that upset Georgetown to win the 1985 NCAA championship. He won the Most Outstanding Player award for the Final Four. Also won the Robert V. Geasey Award as the Big 5 player of the year in 1985. Pros: Drafted No. 10 overall by Phoenix in 1985. Played with the Suns until 1987. Also played for Sacramento Kings (1987–89), Boston Celtics (1989–94)
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