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Eddie Vedder

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LIVING
April 28, 1995 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Post, USA Today and Inquirer staffer Dan DeLuca
Eddie Vedder made an undeclared appearance at the Trocadero Wednesday night playing drums with the art-noise band, Hovercraft, led by his wife, Beth Liebling. So as not to upstage his mate, the Pearl Jam leader at first showed in dark glasses and a wig. But by the second set - when he jammed for an hour with ex- Nirvanans Dave Grohl and Pat Smear plus legendary punk bassist Mike Watt - he gave in to "Ed-die" chants and doffed the disguise. Swilling a Yuengling Lager, Vedder's only words to the crowd were: "I haven't been in Philadelphia for a while.
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In his now 20-year role as Pearl Jam's vocalist and lyricist, Eddie Vedder has been regarded as brooding, obtuse, intelligent, and intense. What he has probably never been thought of, until now, is charming. It is through his new solo efforts, the live Water on the Road Blu-ray and the sweet and aptly titled Ukulele Songs , that his levels of gracefulness have become apparent. During his sold-out solo show Saturday at the Tower Theater, with opener Glen Hansard and a few special guests, the elegant manner in which Vedder embraced songs old, new, borrowed, and blue was mesmerizing in a way that bested even his weightier performances with Pearl Jam. For all this allure and panache, Vedder never lacked for aggression.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2002 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Eddie Vedder looks out at the canyons of Manhattan from the top-floor balcony of the SoHo Grand Hotel. This has been his perch for 10 days, his refuge while finishing the artwork and beginning promotion for Pearl Jam's seventh studio album in 11 years, Riot Act. The singer and songwriter is on intimate terms with the office towers and high-rise apartments in the distance, not to mention the massive hole nearby, where the twin towers stood....
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1995 | By Sara Sherr, FOR THE INQUIRER
Current modern-rock staple Green Apple Quick Step is one of the more promising candidates in the less-than-promising genre known as "modern rock. " On Friday, the Seattle quintet, concentrating on material from their latest album, the mostly forgettable Related (Medicine), began a series of appearances in Philadelphia before a midsized, enthusiastic crowd at J.C. Dobbs. (The group will appear Friday at the Khyber Pass Pub.) The playing of guitarists Steve Ross and Dan Klempthorne and the unassuming vocals of bassist Mari Anne Braeden gave energy to the brief set at Dobbs.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
GLENN BECK is moving to Philly. Kind of. In the wake of the news that Rush Limbaugh will be returning to 1210 WPHT, I've learned exclusively that Beck will give his Internet-only TheBlaze Radio Network a Philadelphia feel by adding local news and weather twice per hour and traffic four times per hour, provided by partnerships with local news and information services. Philly is the first market for the localized expansion, but I hear Beck wants to move to more markets.
NEWS
April 30, 2003 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
There's a level of trust between Pearl Jam and its audience that has become virtually unheard of among big acts and their fans. Pearl Jam's members know they can open a sold-out arena gig - such as Monday's 2 3/4-hour marathon at the First Union Spectrum - with the Southern Gothic strum of Victoria Williams' "Crazy Mary" and not lose the frothing crowd. The audience obliges the band, sensing that the sonic butt-kicking it craves - like the white-knuckle double shot of "Spin the Black Circle" and "Hail Hail" that quickly followed - will be just around the corner.
NEWS
October 3, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's been a dozen years since Pearl Jam, with Nirvana, stood at the center of the culture as Seattle's godheads of grunge. As he made clear during the band's sold-out show Friday at the Borgata Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City, Eddie Vedder is keenly aware of that passage of time. "We don't need to be crowd-surfing like it was some video from 1992," the 40-year-old singer said as he surveyed a sea of jostling bodies. "We're all older, smarter, and perhaps more fragile now. " And, he might have added, still able to command a mass audience hungry for muscled-up rock-and-roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ever since the mega-platinum success of Ten, Pearl Jam's fist-pumping 1991 debut, the band has been atoning for the sin of popularity. The great thorn in the side of frontman Eddie Vedder is that Pearl Jam is loved by the people Kurt Cobain hated - the well-adjusted, reasonably privileged, high- fivin' white guys - so the albums got weirder: less anthemic, more personal and idiosyncratic. The magazine cover story offers were politely declined, and videomaking was completely sworn off. As such, Pearl Jam managed to downsize its audience to a manageable million or two, shaking loose the emotional tourists and the pop culture sheep.
NEWS
June 13, 2009 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Eddie Vedder is a golden god to that sector of the rock-audience demographic that loves sports as much as it loves music. On Thursday night, the first of a two-night sold-out solo stand at the Tower Theater, Vedder regaled the crowd with tales of soul-brother handshakes with Dr. J and bar-hopping during the NBA Finals with Sean Penn and Jack Nicholson (wherein a beautiful woman walks up to Jack and asks if he wants to dance, and Jack responds that...
NEWS
May 29, 2006 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
The most "alternative" thing about Pearl Jam in 1992 was the band's hometown. Alt-rock's heavy punk-indie hybrid style was born in Seattle, so any group with four Seattleites must be alternative - even if frontman Eddie Vedder was a California surfer dude, even if their riffs were the stuff of conventional hard rock. Throughout the '90s, however, the band struggled admirably to live up to that tag's musical and social implications, growing rawer yet more experimental, and adopting a staunch anticorporate stance.
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NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
GLENN BECK is moving to Philly. Kind of. In the wake of the news that Rush Limbaugh will be returning to 1210 WPHT, I've learned exclusively that Beck will give his Internet-only TheBlaze Radio Network a Philadelphia feel by adding local news and weather twice per hour and traffic four times per hour, provided by partnerships with local news and information services. Philly is the first market for the localized expansion, but I hear Beck wants to move to more markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Pearl Jam performed "Wishlist," a song from 1998's Yield , during its three-hour sold-out show at the Wells Fargo Center on Monday, Eddie Vedder added some lyrics not in the original. "My only wish is to wish for nothing," the leader of the enduring Seattle band sang. "Who could ask for more than that?" Then, before pushing off to "Sirens" from the sturdy new mortality-contemplating Lightning Bolt , Vedder, 48, elaborated on his Zen grunge idea. He told of being a 15-year-old "idiot" who used to grind up cheap speed pills known as "Black Beauties" on his first Fender Stratocaster.
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In his now 20-year role as Pearl Jam's vocalist and lyricist, Eddie Vedder has been regarded as brooding, obtuse, intelligent, and intense. What he has probably never been thought of, until now, is charming. It is through his new solo efforts, the live Water on the Road Blu-ray and the sweet and aptly titled Ukulele Songs , that his levels of gracefulness have become apparent. During his sold-out solo show Saturday at the Tower Theater, with opener Glen Hansard and a few special guests, the elegant manner in which Vedder embraced songs old, new, borrowed, and blue was mesmerizing in a way that bested even his weightier performances with Pearl Jam. For all this allure and panache, Vedder never lacked for aggression.
NEWS
November 1, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Forty-two years after opening its doors with the Quaker City Jazz Festival, and 15 months after its impending demolition was announced, the Spectrum said the last of its long goodbyes in South Philadelphia last night. The master of ceremonies for the momentous occasion was Eddie Vedder, the charismatic rock star whose band, Pearl Jam, played the final four shows at the venue, which opened in 1967. The grand finale brought the curtain down on the storied arena, which was home to championship Flyers and Sixers teams before the Wachovia Center opened in 1996.
NEWS
June 13, 2009 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Eddie Vedder is a golden god to that sector of the rock-audience demographic that loves sports as much as it loves music. On Thursday night, the first of a two-night sold-out solo stand at the Tower Theater, Vedder regaled the crowd with tales of soul-brother handshakes with Dr. J and bar-hopping during the NBA Finals with Sean Penn and Jack Nicholson (wherein a beautiful woman walks up to Jack and asks if he wants to dance, and Jack responds that...
NEWS
May 29, 2006 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
The most "alternative" thing about Pearl Jam in 1992 was the band's hometown. Alt-rock's heavy punk-indie hybrid style was born in Seattle, so any group with four Seattleites must be alternative - even if frontman Eddie Vedder was a California surfer dude, even if their riffs were the stuff of conventional hard rock. Throughout the '90s, however, the band struggled admirably to live up to that tag's musical and social implications, growing rawer yet more experimental, and adopting a staunch anticorporate stance.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The summer concert season tunes up - big time - this weekend, with the Jam on the River on Penn's Landing and Pearl Jam across the river at the Tweeter Center in Camden. Summer means lots of big names and big shows - in addition to the oversize events highlighted here, there are plenty of others, mostly at the Tweeter, where it seems as if there's a marquee name most nights: Def Leppard and Journey on June 23; the Dave Matthews Band on June 27 and 28; the Warped tour (with Joan Jett and Against Me!
NEWS
October 3, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's been a dozen years since Pearl Jam, with Nirvana, stood at the center of the culture as Seattle's godheads of grunge. As he made clear during the band's sold-out show Friday at the Borgata Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City, Eddie Vedder is keenly aware of that passage of time. "We don't need to be crowd-surfing like it was some video from 1992," the 40-year-old singer said as he surveyed a sea of jostling bodies. "We're all older, smarter, and perhaps more fragile now. " And, he might have added, still able to command a mass audience hungry for muscled-up rock-and-roll.
NEWS
April 30, 2003 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
There's a level of trust between Pearl Jam and its audience that has become virtually unheard of among big acts and their fans. Pearl Jam's members know they can open a sold-out arena gig - such as Monday's 2 3/4-hour marathon at the First Union Spectrum - with the Southern Gothic strum of Victoria Williams' "Crazy Mary" and not lose the frothing crowd. The audience obliges the band, sensing that the sonic butt-kicking it craves - like the white-knuckle double shot of "Spin the Black Circle" and "Hail Hail" that quickly followed - will be just around the corner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2003 | By HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
COMEDIAN Rosie O'Donnell demanded a retraction from the National Enquirer yesterday for: a) Saying she was actually a space alien; b) Claiming she ate her cat during a marathon midnight snack; c) Reporting that she was not-so-secretly a man; d) Publishing a story stating she and her live-in partner, Kelli Carpenter were on the verge of splitting up. Yeah, the answer is d. Like who cares. The story, published in the April 15 issue (so how can we really be sure it's not true since April 15 is 11 days from now)
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