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Edith Wharton

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1992 | By Lewis Beale, FOR THE INQUIRER
How 'bout that Edith Wharton? Dead since 1937, and all of a sudden she's a hot property: Martin Scorsese is making a movie out of her The Age of Innocence; Ethan Frome was recently filmed for PBS's American Playhouse, and The Children, which will be released theatrically in Europe this year, hits American video stores this month. Wharton isn't the only female author enjoying a posthumous cinematic revival. In various stages of development are film or TV versions of classic books by Kate Chopin, the Bronte sisters, Jean Rhys, Ayn Rand, Willa Cather and Beryl Markham.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It promised to be the mismatch of the century. In one corner, Martin Scorsese, two-fisted chronicler of New York neighborhoods and their misfits (see Raging Bull, GoodFellas). In the other, Edith Wharton, refined limner of Manhattan society and its cosmopolites (see The House of Mirth, Custom of the Country). What right did Scorsese have being in the same ring with the turn-of-the- century novelist? How would this filmmaker, more familiar with boxing gloves than opera gloves, adapt Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning The Age of Innocence, a subtle and hushed saga of 1870s manners?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1997 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
You might not think a play that turns on something as mundane as a broken pickle dish would have much hold on your attention, but the Foundation Theatre production of Ethan Frome is an involving piece of theater. A dramatization of the novella by Edith Wharton, Ethan Frome is set in a New England village in the mid-19th century. The locale is reflected in Dennis Krausnick's adaptation and Julie Ellen Prusinowski's nicely conceived, well-acted production. Both are straightforward, unadorned and speak directly to the audience Krausnick's engaging script is a skillful mix of narration and drama.
NEWS
June 15, 2008
After getting married in 1870, Mark Twain used his wife's inheritance money and book proceeds to build a fabulous 14,000-square-foot house in Hartford, Conn. Financial troubles forced Twain to eventually sell the house. The house has survived other threats over the years, but once again it is beset by financial troubles that cry out for attention. In 1927, the house was saved from the wrecking ball by a developer who wanted to build apartments on the property. The home was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1963 and restored for its centennial in 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1989 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
No serious audio-book collection would be complete without at least one title by Edith Wharton, one of America's most accomplished authors. She has frequently been compared - favorably - with her friend and mentor, Henry James. And for Wharton narrators, you can't do better than Flo Gibson, who has lent a most proper aristocratic tone to eight Wharton readings. Wharton's world is American high society at the turn of the century. But far from being a source of friendship and amiable pleasure, society is a competitive playing field.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Writing and music have much in common, but the similarities that emerge when the two forms of communication are translated into graphic systems of color, as seen in the pairing of paintings by Gerard Brown and Melinda Steffy in "Chromography: Writing in Color" at Rowan University Art Gallery, are remarkable. Brown, a writer and a painter, has transformed writings by Robert Smithson, Judith Butler, Edith Wharton, and Richard Dawkins into his own paintings and prints of nautical signal flags arranged in tumbling-block patterns common to quilting.
NEWS
October 2, 2005 | By Ellen B. Cutler FOR THE INQUIRER
Bullets of rain smashed against the windshield as we drove through New York on the Taconic Parkway. We were headed for Stockbridge, Mass., and the estate of sculptor Daniel Chester French. Western Massachusetts is lousy with places that I have long meant to see. There just never seemed to be the time to detour from occasional runs up Interstate 95. In June, however, the celebration of my mother's 80th birthday in Boston motivated us to schedule a short vacation. We planned stops in New York City and in Stockbridge and Amherst, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Edith Wharton called the enduring characters at the flinty heart of Ethan Frome "granite outcroppings . . . half emerged from the soil and scarcely more articulate. " The strength of John Madden's plain-spoken adaptation of the classic novella lies in the skill with which he has transformed the wintry New England setting of their story into a landscape of the soul. Madden's film inaugurates a bumper movie year for Wharton; the much-awaited Martin Scorsese version of The Age of Innocence is due in the fall.
NEWS
June 10, 1992 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
It's that time of year again in Malvern. The magnificent rock garden is flourishing, the bosky Chester County landscape is sending out its siren call, and the 1992 Short Stuff Festival of the People's Light & Theatre Co. is off and running. The Short Stuff Festival works like this: Sixteen short plays are grouped into seven programs, each running approximately one hour. The playgoer can mix and match the seven programs, up to a point, at a pleasingly retrogressive price scale - that is, the more shows you buy, the more money you save (with judicious planning, you can see all 16 plays for a paltry $40)
NEWS
September 16, 1993 | by Chuck Arnold, Daily News Staff Writer
Summer's over and school's just beginning, but don't despair: There are fewer than 100 days left until Christmas vacation. Until then, you can always go see a movie when the real world gets too real for you to deal. Or when you need a cheap date. Here's the freshest of the fall crop of flicks, whether you're into Macaulay Culkin, Edith Wharton or cross-dressing nannies: SUMMER REDUX Dazed and Confused. This could be the perfect mind trip if you're longing for the hazy days of summer already.
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NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Writing and music have much in common, but the similarities that emerge when the two forms of communication are translated into graphic systems of color, as seen in the pairing of paintings by Gerard Brown and Melinda Steffy in "Chromography: Writing in Color" at Rowan University Art Gallery, are remarkable. Brown, a writer and a painter, has transformed writings by Robert Smithson, Judith Butler, Edith Wharton, and Richard Dawkins into his own paintings and prints of nautical signal flags arranged in tumbling-block patterns common to quilting.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Something is missing. Something obvious. Usually, it's so obvious you can't avoid it - in Center City, or leaching out into the neighborhoods and suburbs. But even though it's gone, few seem to have noticed. "I totally didn't," said Steve Red, an advertising executive whose offices are just a few feet beneath the 17-ton object that has abruptly vanished. Ring any bells? No bell, in fact, is ringing, and that's the point. The bell in question is exactly where it's always been, if quiet of late.
NEWS
June 15, 2008
After getting married in 1870, Mark Twain used his wife's inheritance money and book proceeds to build a fabulous 14,000-square-foot house in Hartford, Conn. Financial troubles forced Twain to eventually sell the house. The house has survived other threats over the years, but once again it is beset by financial troubles that cry out for attention. In 1927, the house was saved from the wrecking ball by a developer who wanted to build apartments on the property. The home was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1963 and restored for its centennial in 1974.
NEWS
October 2, 2005 | By Ellen B. Cutler FOR THE INQUIRER
Bullets of rain smashed against the windshield as we drove through New York on the Taconic Parkway. We were headed for Stockbridge, Mass., and the estate of sculptor Daniel Chester French. Western Massachusetts is lousy with places that I have long meant to see. There just never seemed to be the time to detour from occasional runs up Interstate 95. In June, however, the celebration of my mother's 80th birthday in Boston motivated us to schedule a short vacation. We planned stops in New York City and in Stockbridge and Amherst, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1997 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
You might not think a play that turns on something as mundane as a broken pickle dish would have much hold on your attention, but the Foundation Theatre production of Ethan Frome is an involving piece of theater. A dramatization of the novella by Edith Wharton, Ethan Frome is set in a New England village in the mid-19th century. The locale is reflected in Dennis Krausnick's adaptation and Julie Ellen Prusinowski's nicely conceived, well-acted production. Both are straightforward, unadorned and speak directly to the audience Krausnick's engaging script is a skillful mix of narration and drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1995 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
The rough and ready Wall Street financier - rather common after all, despite his riches - doesn't usually bother with social questions. But he's just a little puzzled. And so he asks his luncheon partner, a politician: "Why is it that we Americans, who fought our great war for independence, are so keen to make millions of dollars - only to shift them back into the pockets of the English nobility?" "Because you like their style," the man responds. And their boisterous laughter disturbs the refined conversation of the dukes and marquises around them at the London club.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"Genius is of small use to a woman who does not know how to do her hair. " Edith Wharton offered this prickly bit of social commentary in 1900. She was 38 then, recovered from a nervous breakdown and gasping for breath under the suffocating conventions of New York City's high society. Wharton eventually made her escape and gave the world some of the 20th century's finest fiction. Tonight, actress Irene Worth will read from Wharton's writings in her one-woman show, A Portrait of Edith Wharton, at Bryn Mawr College.
NEWS
September 16, 1993 | by Chuck Arnold, Daily News Staff Writer
Summer's over and school's just beginning, but don't despair: There are fewer than 100 days left until Christmas vacation. Until then, you can always go see a movie when the real world gets too real for you to deal. Or when you need a cheap date. Here's the freshest of the fall crop of flicks, whether you're into Macaulay Culkin, Edith Wharton or cross-dressing nannies: SUMMER REDUX Dazed and Confused. This could be the perfect mind trip if you're longing for the hazy days of summer already.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It promised to be the mismatch of the century. In one corner, Martin Scorsese, two-fisted chronicler of New York neighborhoods and their misfits (see Raging Bull, GoodFellas). In the other, Edith Wharton, refined limner of Manhattan society and its cosmopolites (see The House of Mirth, Custom of the Country). What right did Scorsese have being in the same ring with the turn-of-the- century novelist? How would this filmmaker, more familiar with boxing gloves than opera gloves, adapt Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning The Age of Innocence, a subtle and hushed saga of 1870s manners?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Edith Wharton called the enduring characters at the flinty heart of Ethan Frome "granite outcroppings . . . half emerged from the soil and scarcely more articulate. " The strength of John Madden's plain-spoken adaptation of the classic novella lies in the skill with which he has transformed the wintry New England setting of their story into a landscape of the soul. Madden's film inaugurates a bumper movie year for Wharton; the much-awaited Martin Scorsese version of The Age of Innocence is due in the fall.
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