CollectionsEdmund Bacon
IN THE NEWS

Edmund Bacon

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia is a city that struggles with certain disadvantages. It is not easy being stuck midway between the nation's financial and political capitals. It doesn't regularly produce winning sports teams. We don't have enough corporate giants headquartered here, or enough of the philanthropists who trail in their wake. But the most inexplicable shortcoming, it's always seemed to me, was that there's no biography of Edmund Bacon. Bacon was not merely the greatest urban planner Philadelphia ever produced, he was also one of the greatest characters to figure on the city stage in the 20th century.
NEWS
October 15, 2005
Greatness is not always cuddly. Edmund Bacon, the legendary city planner who died yesterday at age 95, was undeniably great. It's hard to imagine what Philadelphia would be today had Ed Bacon not made it his laboratory, his labor, his love for all those decades. Mr. Bacon was also undeniably stubborn and combative. He was always ready to fight the good fight, and some that were a little dubious. Few men harbor dreams for their city as grand as the ones he dreamt for Philadelphia; fewer still see so many of their ideas turned into glass and steel and concrete and macadam.
NEWS
October 17, 2005
THE LAST FEW WEEKS have been tough ones for Philadelphia, as a number of civic leaders have passed away. First, local ACLU head Stefan Presser, who devoted his life to the protection of civil rights. Then C. DeLores Tucker, the flamboyant advocate for equal rights for women and minorities. A few days later, Robert Montgomery Scott, the Main Line philanthropist and devoted exponent of the arts. It's as if an entire generation of Philadelphia's most impassioned leadership is disappearing before our eyes.
NEWS
October 15, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury and Leonard W. Boasberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Edmund Bacon, 95, the brilliant, irascible city planner who spent much of the first part of the 20th century reinventing Philadelphia and the American city and much of the latter part defending his achievements, died yesterday of natural causes at his Center City home, according to family members. He suffered in recent years from a variety of what were, to him, mostly annoying ailments and infirmities that got in the way of doing things. Whether Mr. Bacon was pushing for the demolition of the city's infamous Chinese Wall to make way for the modern commercial downtown, arguing for selective redevelopment of a shabby river ward that became known as Society Hill, conceiving of a central city mall anchored by big department stores - the future Market East - or sketching out plans for what became iconic spaces such as Independence Mall and JFK Plaza, he kept one thing foremost in his mind: Philadelphia could be at the top of contemporary American cities, boasting a vibrant center, muscular public design, housing for the middle and upper classes, and rejuvenated green spaces.
NEWS
October 7, 1996 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer
Renowned Philadelphia city planner Edmund Bacon is wading back into the controversy over a proposed redesign of Independence Mall with a new plan of how he envisions the historic area. A model of Bacon's revised plan for the mall will be on public display for the first time tonight at the Free Library in conjunction with a presentation by acclaimed architect and city planner Alexander Garvin. After years of often contentious discussion, the National Park Service is nearing a decision on a mall redesign that would include a new Gateway Visitors Center.
NEWS
March 7, 1997
Can he really be only 38? It seems several cinematic eras ago that Kevin Bacon first caught our eye in Diner as that '50s-vintage slacker, Fenwick, who amazed his pals with his rapid-fire answers to quiz-show questions. That was 1982 - and he'd already been making movies for four years. Now he's the subject of this week's Philadelphia Weekend Film Festival. It's a fitting tribute to a Philly kid made good. Since Mr. Bacon's debut in Animal House, the movies - some of them schlocky, some of them superb - have followed at a breakneck pace, 30 in all. He's been an astronaut (Apollo 13)
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Life is a party. And Ruth Bacon the quintessential party planner. "She was an incredible mom. She could find something fun to do anywhere at any time," said actor Kevin Bacon, 32, one of Ruth and Edmund Bacon's six children. "She could take an ordinary kitchen and turn it into a playroom. She could find theater and playacting around every corner. " Living rooms became dance studios. Circles in the grass became magical places where dances were created. An overflowing costume box yielded hundreds of fantasy characters for the Bacon children.
NEWS
June 6, 2004 | By Chris Satullo
"A pimple on an elephant's hide. " With that elegant phrase, Philadelphia's managing director dismissed the issue of whether to restore skateboarding in LOVE Park. Thus, Philip Goldsmith rejected an offer from DC Shoes Inc. to give the city $1 million over 10 years to maintain LOVE. In return, the city would allow street skaters to regain their mecca for a limited time every day, minimizing the annoyance their rebellious, riveting sport would cause. This smart compromise was crafted by skaters working with a group called Young Involved Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 23, 2004 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Hometown Legends: Ed Bacon Tonight at 8:30 on WHYY (Channel 12) In its lazy and superficial biography of city planner Edmund Bacon, which airs tonight, WHYY perpetuates the uncritical hero worship that has surrounded him since his autocratic reign as Philadelphia's master builder in the '50s and '60s. Instead of exploring Bacon's mixed legacy - which left Philadelphia with a revived Society Hill neighborhood, but dead zones around City Hall and Penn's Landing - the half-hour documentary prefers to spend its precious minutes gushing over Bacon's semi-famous son Kevin, the Hollywood actor.
NEWS
June 29, 1999 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer
The technology may be new and the audio and visual may be state of the art, but, says venerable city planner Edmund Bacon, the notion of a sound-and-light show at Independence Hall dates back 40 years. Blame alcohol. Blame bad dry runs. But some ideas just need time to simmer. "I got the idea when traveling in Europe," Bacon said. It was the 1950s, and he visited the Chateau de Chambord in France's Loire Valley. The curator, Robert Houdin, the son of magician Harry Houdini, is considered the father of modern sound-and-light shows.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 28, 2014
I LOVE LOVE Park. It's not perfect - few things are in Philly - but it is a gem. The iconic Robert Indiana LOVE sculpture frames a view up the Parkway to the Art Museum that could compete with any cityscape. It's a Philadelphia classic that attracts camera-toting visitors day and night. The main thing wrong with LOVE Park is not the design, but the people - the ones who litter (attracting rats), the ones who skateboard (scarring surfaces and cracking tiles) and the serenity-shattering panhandlers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia is a city that struggles with certain disadvantages. It is not easy being stuck midway between the nation's financial and political capitals. It doesn't regularly produce winning sports teams. We don't have enough corporate giants headquartered here, or enough of the philanthropists who trail in their wake. But the most inexplicable shortcoming, it's always seemed to me, was that there's no biography of Edmund Bacon. Bacon was not merely the greatest urban planner Philadelphia ever produced, he was also one of the greatest characters to figure on the city stage in the 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2012 | Ellen Gray
  THAT SIX DEGREES of Kevin Bacon game is about to get a lot easier. The Philly-raised Bacon, who's famously worked with at least half the actors in Hollywood, will be tracking a vast network of serial killers in "The Following," a new drama from Kevin Williamson ("Vampire Diaries," "Dawson's Creek") that Fox's entertainment chief calls "our next ‘24.' " Premiering at midseason — where Fox is still at its strongest — it has Bacon playing a former FBI agent brought in to help deal with a death-row escapee (James Purefoy, "Rome")
NEWS
July 3, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
In X-Men: First Class , one of the summer's box-office hits ($320 million worldwide and counting), Kevin Bacon stars as a maniacal mutant super-villain. Later this month, the Philadelphia born-and-bred actor can be seen with Steve Carell in the comedy Crazy, Stupid, Love . "I've always mixed it up," Bacon says on the phone from Los Angeles, where his wife, Kyra Sedgwick, is shooting the final season of The Closer . "That's been my MO. I don't want to do one kind of movie.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Here's a little thought experiment to get you steamed: What if the celebrated urban planner Edmund Bacon had embraced the prevailing ideology of the 1960s and leveled Society Hill, replacing its blocks of outmoded, colonial-era townhouses with sleek modern high-rises for middle-class families? Would Philadelphia be a livelier, more successful place today? Frankly, it's hard to imagine that wiping out one of today's most desirable urban neighborhoods in the city, if not the country, could have benefited anyone, rich or poor.
NEWS
October 17, 2005
THE LAST FEW WEEKS have been tough ones for Philadelphia, as a number of civic leaders have passed away. First, local ACLU head Stefan Presser, who devoted his life to the protection of civil rights. Then C. DeLores Tucker, the flamboyant advocate for equal rights for women and minorities. A few days later, Robert Montgomery Scott, the Main Line philanthropist and devoted exponent of the arts. It's as if an entire generation of Philadelphia's most impassioned leadership is disappearing before our eyes.
NEWS
October 16, 2005 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Edmund N. Bacon, who died Friday at 95, was a planning visionary who dragged a declining, smoke-blackened Philadelphia kicking and screaming into the modern postindustrial age. But he was also an ideologue so entranced by his own vision that he couldn't always tell when best to leave stodgy old Philadelphia exactly as it was. To understand Bacon's huge accomplishments and huge failings, it is worth remembering that he was born in 1910 and...
NEWS
October 15, 2005
Greatness is not always cuddly. Edmund Bacon, the legendary city planner who died yesterday at age 95, was undeniably great. It's hard to imagine what Philadelphia would be today had Ed Bacon not made it his laboratory, his labor, his love for all those decades. Mr. Bacon was also undeniably stubborn and combative. He was always ready to fight the good fight, and some that were a little dubious. Few men harbor dreams for their city as grand as the ones he dreamt for Philadelphia; fewer still see so many of their ideas turned into glass and steel and concrete and macadam.
NEWS
October 15, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury and Leonard W. Boasberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Edmund Bacon, 95, the brilliant, irascible city planner who spent much of the first part of the 20th century reinventing Philadelphia and the American city and much of the latter part defending his achievements, died yesterday of natural causes at his Center City home, according to family members. He suffered in recent years from a variety of what were, to him, mostly annoying ailments and infirmities that got in the way of doing things. Whether Mr. Bacon was pushing for the demolition of the city's infamous Chinese Wall to make way for the modern commercial downtown, arguing for selective redevelopment of a shabby river ward that became known as Society Hill, conceiving of a central city mall anchored by big department stores - the future Market East - or sketching out plans for what became iconic spaces such as Independence Mall and JFK Plaza, he kept one thing foremost in his mind: Philadelphia could be at the top of contemporary American cities, boasting a vibrant center, muscular public design, housing for the middle and upper classes, and rejuvenated green spaces.
NEWS
December 19, 2004 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kobe's got another player gunning for him. Nas, the mono-named New York rapper, leaves little of the Lower Merion grad standing at the end of his new song "These Are Our Heroes. " In the cut from his new CD, Street's Disciple, the outspoken singer blasts Bryant, the Los Angeles Lakers' tarnished star, for having abusive relationships with white women, disrespecting Shaquille O'Neal, and letting down young fans. Most of the lyrics don't pass the breakfast test, but here's a taste: While scorching O.J. Simpson, Taye Diggs and Tiger Woods, Nas calls the basketball player a "stupid spoof" and rhymes his name with Toby, the slave owner's handle for Kunte Kinte in Alex Haley's Roots.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|