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Edmund Pettus Bridge

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NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. John Lewis, a sharecropper's son who helped lead the 1965 "Bloody Sunday" march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., will receive this year's Liberty Medal, the National Constitution Center announced Thursday. Lewis, a Democrat who represents Georgia's Fifth District, is the last surviving "Big Six" leader of the civil rights movement. Others in the group were the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., James Farmer, A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, and Whitney Young. "It is an honor for me to receive the Liberty Medal, especially as the U.S. Constitution Center celebrates the 150th anniversary of the 14th Amendment," Lewis, who was out of the country, said in a statement.
NEWS
March 8, 1999 | By Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Flanked by former comrades from the civil rights movement and current colleagues in Congress, Rep. John Lewis led a delegation of 20 lawmakers across the Edmund Pettus Bridge yesterday to commemorate the violent, defining moment that helped win voting rights for black Americans. Thirty-four years ago yesterday, mounted state troopers beat and trampled voting-rights demonstrators, led by Lewis, as they crossed the bridge to begin a march to Alabama's capital. Yesterday, with the gray, rusting bridge as a backdrop, the Georgia Democrat urged his colleagues and more than 500 other marchers to "continue to build bridges of understanding, bridges of reconciliation.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - The Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth, who was bombed, beaten and repeatedly arrested in the fight for civil rights and hailed by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. for his courage and tenacity, has died. He was 89. Relatives said that Shuttlesworth died yesterday at Princeton Baptist Medical Center, in Birmingham. A former truck driver who studied religion at night, Shuttlesworth became pastor of Bethel Baptist Church, in Birmingham, in 1953 and soon emerged as an outspoken leader in the struggle for racial equality.
NEWS
July 17, 1987 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
At least a score of high school and college students and others interested in the history of the civil rights movement are scheduled to leave Philadelphia this morning on a week-long bus trip to places in Alabama and Georgia that were the sites of significant events in the movement. The trip, sponsored by the Philadelphia Martin Luther King Jr. Association for Nonviolence Inc., will include a four-day workshop on nonviolence at the Martin Luther King Center in Atlanta. When the bus arrives in Selma, Ala., tomorrow, the 1987 "Freedom Riders" will retrace the steps that their counterparts followed in 1965.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Phillip Rawls, Associated Press
SELMA, Ala. - The vice president and black leaders commemorating a famous civil-rights march on Sunday said efforts to diminish the impact of African Americans' votes haven't stopped in the years since the 1965 Voting Rights Act added millions to Southern voter rolls. More than 5,000 people followed Vice President Biden and Rep. John Lewis (D., Ga.) across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma's annual Bridge Crossing Jubilee. The event commemorates the "Bloody Sunday" beating of voting rights marchers - including a young Lewis - by state troopers as they began a march to Montgomery in March 1965.
NEWS
July 25, 1988 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
"If you will protest courageously and yet with dignity and Christian love, when the history books are written in future generations the historians will pause and say, 'There lived a great people - a black people - who injected new meaning and dignity into the veins of civilization.' " - The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., 1955 Police met the demonstrators at the foot of the Edmund Pettus Bridge, just as they had 23 years ago. But this time, the Alabama officers didn't swing billy clubs, crack horse whips or throw tear gas. They didn't rush the crowd of mostly black faces, beating and ridiculing them as they did in 1965.
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Millions of Americans try to find an appropriate way to observe Martin Luther King Day each year. Here's one: Take a young person who is old enough to understand to see Selma . Or go by yourself or with a group to be reminded of why this nation set aside a day to commemorate the murdered civil rights leader. Much has been made of the film's apparent inaccuracies, which in truth are more akin to literary license, such as depicting conversations that actually happened but were not recorded.
NEWS
July 18, 1987 | By Maida Odom, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol Blackman sent her son, Jahmal Jenkins, off yesterday morning hoping he would experience "something sacred. " Shortly after 7 a.m., Jenkins, 19, and 13 other Philadelphia-area young people embarked on a bus trip back in time: a journey devised for students to relive history and learn about the civil rights movement by retracing the steps of civil rights activists in the South during the 1960s. "It's more than an education," Blackman said. "It's an opportunity to experience history.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Commissioner Stephanie Singer this week compared the removal of her name from the May 19 primary ballot to the beatings of civil rights marchers 50 years ago in Selma, Ala. Singer, who is white, e-mailed supporters a fund-raising plea Tuesday with this title: "URGENT, Civil Rights in Philadelphia. " She recounted the violence visited upon the marchers in 1965 on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, though she spelled the bridge's name Pettis . "The heroes of Selma in 1965 were fighting for the people of Philadelphia in 2015," Singer wrote.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fifty years after the historic March on Washington, a panel of key black leaders in Philadelphia on Friday said the most important issues facing African Americans are the need for jobs, improvements in education, and preserving the right to vote. At the National Urban League's conference at the Convention Center, leaders including the Rev. Al Sharpton, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, and Urban League president and CEO Marc Morial addressed those issues during a panel discussion entitled "50 Years and Marching On. " "Black unemployment has not decreased," Sharpton said after a question from the moderator, the journalist George Curry.
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NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. John Lewis, a sharecropper's son who helped lead the 1965 "Bloody Sunday" march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., will receive this year's Liberty Medal, the National Constitution Center announced Thursday. Lewis, a Democrat who represents Georgia's Fifth District, is the last surviving "Big Six" leader of the civil rights movement. Others in the group were the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., James Farmer, A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, and Whitney Young. "It is an honor for me to receive the Liberty Medal, especially as the U.S. Constitution Center celebrates the 150th anniversary of the 14th Amendment," Lewis, who was out of the country, said in a statement.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | Valerie Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
BERNARD Lafayette Jr. wasn't portrayed in the movie "Selma," about the historic marches across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 1965 to seek voting rights for African-American citizens. Yet history shows that the young activists of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) wouldn't have been in Selma if not for Lafayette. Lafayette, who spent part of his childhood in Philadelphia, was a college roommate of former SNCC activist Congressman John R. Lewis (D-Ga.) at American Baptist College, in Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Commissioner Stephanie Singer this week compared the removal of her name from the May 19 primary ballot to the beatings of civil rights marchers 50 years ago in Selma, Ala. Singer, who is white, e-mailed supporters a fund-raising plea Tuesday with this title: "URGENT, Civil Rights in Philadelphia. " She recounted the violence visited upon the marchers in 1965 on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, though she spelled the bridge's name Pettis . "The heroes of Selma in 1965 were fighting for the people of Philadelphia in 2015," Singer wrote.
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Millions of Americans try to find an appropriate way to observe Martin Luther King Day each year. Here's one: Take a young person who is old enough to understand to see Selma . Or go by yourself or with a group to be reminded of why this nation set aside a day to commemorate the murdered civil rights leader. Much has been made of the film's apparent inaccuracies, which in truth are more akin to literary license, such as depicting conversations that actually happened but were not recorded.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. John Lewis, the civil rights leader who was beaten as he and others marched in 1965 from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., had already seen the film Selma three times. But he was invited to watch it again Friday - with President Obama at the White House. "I tell you, I cried some more," said Lewis, 74, who was teargassed and clubbed on the head by Alabama state troopers during the historic march that led to passage of the Voting Rights Act. His head bears the scars. "I saw death.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fifty years after the historic March on Washington, a panel of key black leaders in Philadelphia on Friday said the most important issues facing African Americans are the need for jobs, improvements in education, and preserving the right to vote. At the National Urban League's conference at the Convention Center, leaders including the Rev. Al Sharpton, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, and Urban League president and CEO Marc Morial addressed those issues during a panel discussion entitled "50 Years and Marching On. " "Black unemployment has not decreased," Sharpton said after a question from the moderator, the journalist George Curry.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Phillip Rawls, Associated Press
SELMA, Ala. - The vice president and black leaders commemorating a famous civil-rights march on Sunday said efforts to diminish the impact of African Americans' votes haven't stopped in the years since the 1965 Voting Rights Act added millions to Southern voter rolls. More than 5,000 people followed Vice President Biden and Rep. John Lewis (D., Ga.) across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma's annual Bridge Crossing Jubilee. The event commemorates the "Bloody Sunday" beating of voting rights marchers - including a young Lewis - by state troopers as they began a march to Montgomery in March 1965.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
Mary McCarty writes for the Dayton Daily News It was a quirk of the 24-hour news cycle that the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, one of the lions of the civil rights movement, died the same day as Apple founder Steve Jobs. The New York Times wrote a glowing tribute, but on TV news, Shuttlesworth's death was somewhat eclipsed by that of the iPod inventor. Many commentaries focused on the way that Jobs' inventions transformed our everyday lives. His original partner, Steve Wozniak, compared Jobs to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in terms of his social significance.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - The Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth, who was bombed, beaten and repeatedly arrested in the fight for civil rights and hailed by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. for his courage and tenacity, has died. He was 89. Relatives said that Shuttlesworth died yesterday at Princeton Baptist Medical Center, in Birmingham. A former truck driver who studied religion at night, Shuttlesworth became pastor of Bethel Baptist Church, in Birmingham, in 1953 and soon emerged as an outspoken leader in the struggle for racial equality.
NEWS
November 5, 2010 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fewer than half of Pennsylvania's 8.5 million registered voters troubled themselves to cast ballots in Tuesday's election. But voting wasn't too much trouble for Charles K. Gorby, 83, of Havertown. He did it lying flat on a gurney, his feet sticking out from the voting-booth curtains. A Navy veteran and retired physician, Gorby was coming home via ambulance after a two-week hospital stay that left him too weak to stand. He asked the driver whether he could stop at the Brookline Fire Company station a few blocks from his home.
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