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Education Issues

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NEWS
July 25, 1995 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
The state House Democratic Policy Committee yesterday kicked off the first in a dozen statewide town meetings to solicit feedback on education reform and push its own reform agenda. Committee members said they are holding the meetings because Gov. Ridge has been slow in responding to a request for an education summit at which parents, students and community leaders could voice concerns about education. The committee's efforts are largely viewed as an attempt by school choice opponents to ensure that Ridge's now stalled voucher plan isn't resurrected.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There aren't too many places where you can check out sporting goods, digital player pianos, scissors and glue, not to mention an exhibit of Aedes triseriatus - mosquito larvae wriggling in a plastic container full of water. Then again, there aren't too many events like the annual convention of the New Jersey Education Association - a 150,000-member union that includes 90,000 of the state's public-school teachers. With 50,000-plus attendees expected yesterday and today at the Atlantic City Convention Center, the event is billed as the country's - and perhaps the world's - largest gathering of educators.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THE TOPIC of discussion in a voter forum yesterday with the four Democratic candidates for governor was to be education - and only education. But York County businessman Tom Wolf has opened up a double-digit lead on his opponents. And the May 20 primary election is three short weeks away. So politics swiftly overtook and temporarily displaced policy. State Treasurer Rob McCord used his opening statement to criticize Wolf for serving in 2001 as campaign chairman for then-York Mayor Charles Robertson, who won the primary election but withdrew from the general election after he was charged with murder for the 1969 death of a black woman during a race riot.
NEWS
May 3, 1996 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Seventh-grader Marchanda Keels, of Austin Meehan Middle School, was among the 200 middle school students who marched to City Hall yesterday. As part of Law Week, they carried banners to call attention to education issues. The rally was organized by the Philadelphia Bar Association, Temple Law School, and Philadelphia's Teens, Crime and the Community group.
NEWS
October 15, 2002
IF HISTORY is any indication, the next governor of Pennsylvania will lead us for eight years. Pennsylvania needs a leader who will make education a priority as we journey through the first decade of the 21st century. The state's education system is at a critical crossroad. We must elect a leader with a plan for reform and the courage to make difficult decisions to improve public education for all. The Pennsylvania Partnership for Public Education is committed to engaging the candidates for Pennsylvania's highest office in discussions on key issues facing education: Education funding.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
A peaceful demonstration over education issues turned ugly yesterday when about 25 people stormed the School District Administration Building to protest the removal of an Overbrook High counselor. Two school police officers were knocked down, but not seriously injured, according to John McLees, the district's director of school security. City police were called, but there were no arrests, he said. "They suddenly ran from the street toward the front door," said School District spokesman Charles Thomson.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | By Mac Daniel, Special to The Inquirer
Beginning Tuesday, North Penn School District Superintendent Alan Elko will begin holding monthly coffees with residents to discuss education issues. The meeting times will alternate every month between 7 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. to accommodate varying work schedules. A complete schedule of the meetings is available from the school district. The coffees are open to all residents of the North Penn area and will be held in the district's educational service center at Church Road and Hancock Street in Lansdale.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
AT FIRST, Philadelphia teacher LeShawna Coleman believed she'd be meeting with Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to discuss education issues. Late last week, she was informed that things had changed: Coleman would be having a luncheon meeting with President Obama instead. Coleman, who as a teacher coach with the district works with teachers in classrooms, was one of four educators to have an "honest, open conversation" with Obama in the White House. Duncan was also present. "It's a once-in-a-lifetime experience," Coleman said.
NEWS
October 20, 1997
Residents of Cherry Hill, Haddonfield, Voorhees and the other 14 Camden County municipalities in the Sixth Senatorial District have the sort of Election Day problem that other voters in New Jersey might envy - two qualified candidates competing. Both 18-year-veteran Republican Assemblyman John Rocco and six-year incumbent Democrat Sen. John Adler are respected legislators with experience and knowhow. But the choice in this race so vital to which party controls the New Jersey Senate is John Adler.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
The Board of Education yesterday named a national panel of education experts to render an opinion on School Superintendent David Hornbeck's method of rating schools. The six panel members were named eight months after Hornbeck and board members agreed to an independent review. Moreover, the announcement comes two weeks before the School District is scheduled to release its second annual "performance index" rankings for city schools. Board members Jacques Lurie and Thomas A. Mills lobbied for the review nearly a year ago, when the first school rankings were disclosed, and said that Hornbeck's method overstated school gains by including untested students.
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NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Gov. Corbett took Pennsylvania voters to school last week in "Statistics Class," a 30-second TV spot, complete with bar graphs, that asserts he has increased state education spending to "its highest level ever. " Democratic challenger Tom Wolf "and his special-interest friends," Corbett says into the camera, "have spent millions trying to mislead you that I cut education spending. " Wolf responded with his sharpest attack ad yet, a compendium of news clippings that say Corbett "took an ax" to schools with a $1 billion cut in education dollars that caused 27,000 layoffs and big jumps in local property taxes.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
AT FIRST, Philadelphia teacher LeShawna Coleman believed she'd be meeting with Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to discuss education issues. Late last week, she was informed that things had changed: Coleman would be having a luncheon meeting with President Obama instead. Coleman, who as a teacher coach with the district works with teachers in classrooms, was one of four educators to have an "honest, open conversation" with Obama in the White House. Duncan was also present. "It's a once-in-a-lifetime experience," Coleman said.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THE TOPIC of discussion in a voter forum yesterday with the four Democratic candidates for governor was to be education - and only education. But York County businessman Tom Wolf has opened up a double-digit lead on his opponents. And the May 20 primary election is three short weeks away. So politics swiftly overtook and temporarily displaced policy. State Treasurer Rob McCord used his opening statement to criticize Wolf for serving in 2001 as campaign chairman for then-York Mayor Charles Robertson, who won the primary election but withdrew from the general election after he was charged with murder for the 1969 death of a black woman during a race riot.
NEWS
April 17, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most Philadelphia voters disagree with the way the School Reform Commission is handling its responsibilities. They're dissatisfied with Gov. Corbett's positions on public education. And they side with teachers in an ongoing contract dispute with the Philadelphia School District by a ratio of 4-1 - or so says a poll commissioned by the teachers union. The findings come from a new survey of 554 registered voters commissioned by the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers and conducted by a Democratic polling firm, Washington-based Hart Research Associates.
NEWS
September 5, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE PHILADELPHIA Federation of Teachers hasn't just been busy at the negotiating table lately - today, the union is expected to release two new ads, one of which attacks Mayor Nutter and Gov. Corbett because they "failed to lead" in the school-funding crisis. The commercial, paid for by the PFT, shows a montage of school scenes, including a teacher walking down a hallway with students and kids sitting in a classroom. "Facing overcrowded classrooms in unsafe schools, parents and teachers have offered real sacrifices and real solutions," the female narrator says.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
WHENEVER national publications offer a checklist of fun and charming places to visit in Philadelphia, Point Breeze and Grays Ferry usually aren't neighborhoods that make the cut. Both areas have been plagued for years by poverty, blight, crime and struggling schools. Although there's no easy way to cure those deep-rooted urban ailments, Kenny Gamble's Universal Companies has given itself the task of trying to create a path forward for both communities, thanks to a $100,000 neighborhood planning grant it received earlier this month from the Wells Fargo Regional Foundation.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
This summer, it handed out 40,000 backpacks filled with school supplies to students in Camden and other low-income areas. This week, one of its founders promised to bail out an after-school program that was set to shutter after state funding cuts. Now, Better Education for Kids (B4K), an organization bankrolled by two hedge-fund managers, is using its cash to help elect candidates who agree with its ideas on education, including tenure reform, voucher programs, and teacher merit pay. The group's political action committee has spent money in four competitive districts, including in Burlington County's Seventh Legislative District, where it has fronted more than $31,000 to send glossy fliers promoting Troy Singleton, a Democrat running for the Assembly, according to financial disclosures filed with the state this week.
NEWS
December 14, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
A panel of leaders from every sector of education in the city gathered last night at the Franklin Institute and pledged to work together to ensure quality education for all Philadelphia students. Anthony Conti, chairman of the World Affairs Council, which hosted the event, said the group's mission is to bring education issues to the forefront of the local policy agenda. He noted the achievements of Bodine High School, a special-admissions school that graduates 100 percent of its seniors and where for three straight years instructors received the Ruth Hayre Community Service Award, named in honor of a former president of the Philadelphia Board of Education.
NEWS
August 29, 2008
LABOR DAY weekend not only brings the end of summer, but the end of the teachers' current contracts. Contracts for all school workers, from principals and cafeteria staffs to blue-collar employees, expire Sunday. Not that you'd know it. This year's negotiations with the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers have been so quiet that both sides must have been trained by the Chinese government on how to conduct a news blackout. Not that we think the labor negotiations should be played out in public for theatrical value.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By William C. Kashatus
Patsy Tollin, the second-grade teacher recently dismissed by the Baldwin School, allegedly to appease a wealthy couple, is lucky. She enjoyed a 22-year career on the Main Line before she was sent packing. There are many others who were dispatched much earlier in their careers for challenging the authority of an administrator or wealthy parent. Some were forced to find employment outside teaching, their chosen profession. How do I know? I taught at some of the area's most prestigious private schools for 15 years.
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