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NEWS
May 8, 2012
The following excerpts are from the nominating information submitted to the Lindback Foundation for the winning Philadelphia high school teachers. These teachers will be honored Tuesday at ceremonies at the Prince Music Theater. The Christian R. and Mary S. Lindback Foundation celebrates excellence in education and has been awarding the teaching prizes since 2008. There is one winner from each school. Academy at Palumbo   James W. Dyke James W. Dyke received his bachelor of science degree in chemistry in 1997 and master's degree in educational technology in 2010.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ROUGHLY 15 miles apart, Overbrook High and Upper Dublin High are geographically close - but the two schools are virtually worlds apart when it comes to their academic realities. Upper Dublin, a suburban school, has a full production studio. Overbrook, an urban school, does not have a librarian. Upper Dublin graduates about 99 percent of its students. Overbrook, on 59th Street near Lancaster Avenue in Philadelphia, graduates fewer than 50 percent. And yet, the two schools are grappling with the same issue affecting schools across the state - a drastic reduction in state funding in recent years.
NEWS
September 13, 1998 | By Mike Madden, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Three years of wiring classrooms, linking the Internet to lesson plans, and keeping teachers current with state-of-the-art computers have won statewide recognition for Superintendent Don Falato. Falato will be honored next month as Technologist of the Year by the New Jersey Association for Educational Technology, for his efforts to use high-tech gadgets to enliven old-fashioned reading, writing and arithmetic. "It's nice for the district to get recognition, because the district has really come a long way," Falato said.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer
IMAGINE A PHILADELPHIA School District with kindergarten students creating stories on smart tables with technical capacities similar to that of an iPad. If the U.S. Department of Education chooses the school district to be the recipient of a Race to the Top grant, then such scenes would become reality under a proposal submitted by the district on Friday. The winners of the competition, which aims to personalize education, close achievement gaps and use the latest technology to prepare students for college and jobs, will be announced in December.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | By Sonya Senkowsky, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Board of Education has approved a plan to boost technology education at its elementary school by acquiring one computer for every three students by the end of the 1996-97 school year. Computers, principal Fred Cuddy said last week, have become as critical to the school environment as pencil and paper. Every Logan classroom has at least one, he said, and they are used by all 860 students, from kindergarten through eighth grade. The plan calls for as many as six computers in every classroom.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Ron Todt, Associated Press
A Yale student from Penn Valley, near Narberth, will head to England to study at Oxford as one of 32 Rhodes scholars named for 2013. David Carel, an economics major, received the scholarship established in 1902 by the will of British philanthropist Cecil Rhodes. "I keep sort of checking my phone to see if this actually happened," Carel said Sunday. "It's so hard to believe, I just sort of assume I dreamed the whole thing. " Carel, 21, said he spent much of his undergraduate years studying global health economics, mostly public health, and plans to study comparative social policy.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | By Rory J. O'Connor, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Tens of thousands of "surplus and excess" federal computers could wind up in the nation's schools instead of the trash under an executive order issued by President Clinton. The order, issued last week, isn't going to send any cutting-edge Pentium machines out of Washington and into classrooms; the machines are more probably several years old, with 386 or even 286 chips. But for many classrooms starved for computers - and for a Clinton presidential campaign running, in part, on improving educational technology - even outdated machines look better landing in schools than becoming landfill.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four Northeast public schools will participate in a program that will enable students to take computers home for short stints beginning in the fall. The program, the Take-Home Computer Project, is aimed at improving students' math skills and encouraging girls to take computer science courses. During a pilot project in 20 elementary schools this year, the program also fulfilled a key goal of boosting parental involvement in education, school district officials said last week. Twenty additional schools containing middle school grades 6, 7 and 8 were selected to participate in the project during the 1990-91 school year.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1996 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What will the high school of the 21st century look like? In Radnor, where the district is embarking on a $33.9 million make-over of its 40-year-old high school, the vision includes a state-of-the-art TV studio, an upgraded technology-education wing, four computer centers strategically situated near academic departments, and a sophisticated media center at its hub. Classrooms will have access to cable TV, the Internet, and a local computer network....
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Northeast high schools are among those selected to receive sophisticated videodisc technology that educators say will take the concept of visual learning to new heights. George Washington and Frankford High Schools will receive the new equipment in the fall, along with 10 other city public schools, according to Arlene Kramer, assistant director in the Philadelphia School District's Office of Educational Technology. The program - dubbed Project Video - was funded by a $200,000 grant from the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency.
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NEWS
March 3, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ROUGHLY 15 miles apart, Overbrook High and Upper Dublin High are geographically close - but the two schools are virtually worlds apart when it comes to their academic realities. Upper Dublin, a suburban school, has a full production studio. Overbrook, an urban school, does not have a librarian. Upper Dublin graduates about 99 percent of its students. Overbrook, on 59th Street near Lancaster Avenue in Philadelphia, graduates fewer than 50 percent. And yet, the two schools are grappling with the same issue affecting schools across the state - a drastic reduction in state funding in recent years.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Ron Todt, Associated Press
A Yale student from Penn Valley, near Narberth, will head to England to study at Oxford as one of 32 Rhodes scholars named for 2013. David Carel, an economics major, received the scholarship established in 1902 by the will of British philanthropist Cecil Rhodes. "I keep sort of checking my phone to see if this actually happened," Carel said Sunday. "It's so hard to believe, I just sort of assume I dreamed the whole thing. " Carel, 21, said he spent much of his undergraduate years studying global health economics, mostly public health, and plans to study comparative social policy.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer
IMAGINE A PHILADELPHIA School District with kindergarten students creating stories on smart tables with technical capacities similar to that of an iPad. If the U.S. Department of Education chooses the school district to be the recipient of a Race to the Top grant, then such scenes would become reality under a proposal submitted by the district on Friday. The winners of the competition, which aims to personalize education, close achievement gaps and use the latest technology to prepare students for college and jobs, will be announced in December.
NEWS
May 8, 2012
The following excerpts are from the nominating information submitted to the Lindback Foundation for the winning Philadelphia high school teachers. These teachers will be honored Tuesday at ceremonies at the Prince Music Theater. The Christian R. and Mary S. Lindback Foundation celebrates excellence in education and has been awarding the teaching prizes since 2008. There is one winner from each school. Academy at Palumbo   James W. Dyke James W. Dyke received his bachelor of science degree in chemistry in 1997 and master's degree in educational technology in 2010.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2000 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An international children's advocacy group yesterday called for a moratorium on the introduction of computers in preschools and elementary schools until researchers have examined whether computers are harmful to young children. "It is time to stop for a moment," Joan Almon, a former kindergarten teacher and the U.S. coordinator of the Alliance for Childhood, said during a news conference in Washington. "It is time to take a breath and look at the children again. " The 18-month-old alliance, based in College Park, Md., released a list of more than 75 educators, child-development experts, health professionals and technology experts who have endorsed a moratorium except in cases involving children with certain disabilities.
NEWS
October 23, 1998 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Building an entire house without touching a hammer is an idea that appeals to carpentry teacher Harry Root. His students at the Delaware County Technical High School could learn to frame out windows and install doors without wasting a single bent nail. That is, he said, if his school were equipped with a virtual reality classroom. "I think virtual reality would be a great aid to education, because it would allow the students to build and tear down unlimited projects without the expense of new materials," Root said.
NEWS
September 13, 1998 | By Mike Madden, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Three years of wiring classrooms, linking the Internet to lesson plans, and keeping teachers current with state-of-the-art computers have won statewide recognition for Superintendent Don Falato. Falato will be honored next month as Technologist of the Year by the New Jersey Association for Educational Technology, for his efforts to use high-tech gadgets to enliven old-fashioned reading, writing and arithmetic. "It's nice for the district to get recognition, because the district has really come a long way," Falato said.
NEWS
January 25, 1998 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Judy Angelo loves her job as Burlington City High School's librarian, but being a librarian these days, she will tell you, is a daunting task. And for that she blames technology. "We're probably in the middle of one of the biggest information explosions ever, and it's hard to keep up," Angelo explained. "These days, the printed page is likely to be on a computer. " To keep abreast of technological changes and to learn how to integrate technology into classroom teaching, Angelo and other educators in Burlington County are enrolling in courses at the Educational Technology Training Center (ETTC)
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | By Natalie Kostelni, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When residents received their first viewing Monday of the Spring-Ford School District's budget of $40.2 million for next year, they decided to pick on two big-ticket items - special education and technology. Budget talks did not dominate the meeting as parents and students also aired their concerns about switching the location of this year's high school graduation and the time for the start of elementary schools. The Spring-Ford School District's budget for next year calls for a 14.35-mill increase, for a total tax bill of 257.41 mills, for residents living in Limerick, Royersford and Upper Providence.
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jann Bradshaw likes to keep her computer lab updated with the latest technology. But that's not an easy task when money is scarce, as it is in the local school district. The 29 computers in Bradshaw's lab at the Charles Street School are five years old - dinosaurs when it comes to technology. But now, Bradshaw and four other teachers will be able to update their classroom technology with help from Palmyra Educational Funding Enterprises, a nonprofit local educational foundation that awarded its first teacher mini-grants last week.
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