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NEWS
October 17, 1996 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Educators are invited to learn more about the programs and facilities of the Mercer, Fonthill and James A. Michener Art Museums during an open house starting at 4:30 p.m. Oct. 29. The event will include an opportunity to visit the Michener's new wing and a free audio guide tour through the Mercer Museum. Also, staff from each of the institutions will introduce teachers to the museums' various services and activities. The free event is open to all educators. Reservations should be made by Wednesday.
NEWS
July 19, 2005 | By Debra P. DiLorenzo
Teaching is a challenging career that requires dedication, enthusiasm, stamina, a love for learning and much more. With the state Core Curriculum Content Standards, pressure to produce academic results, and constant assessment of the education provided by our public schools, the need for teachers to remain current in teaching methods is increasingly important. For these reasons, the participation of 28 teachers in the Chamber of Commerce Southern New Jersey's South Jersey Summer Institute for Educators program is commendable.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | By Yvette Ousley, Special to The Inquirer
The latest high-tech educational tool - a satellite dish and transmitting station - got favorable reviews at Monday's work session of the Great Valley school board. The so-called satellite-earth station proposal has been in the works for the last year, according to David Morgan, assistant superintendent of instruction. The proposal was drafted by George Martynick, a science and video communications teacher at Great Valley High School, and Betty Bernardin, chairwoman of the audio visual department.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Warrington, 77, of Yeadon, a longtime Philadelphia public school teacher and vice principal, died Thursday at Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital in Darby. Mr. Warrington began his career teaching history in Philadelphia's junior high schools. After 36 years in the public school system, including 10 years as vice principal of the John P. Turner Middle School in West Philadelphia, he retired in 1978. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Warrington graduated from Central High School in 1935.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | By Ovetta Wiggins, Special to The Inquirer
More than 400 teachers, administrators and college professors are expected to attend the spring conference of the N.J. Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development (NJASCD) at 3:30 p.m. tomorrow at Cinnaminson High School. Educators from Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties will discuss the most effective tools available in education. "The workshops give teachers a chance to get new information," said Nicholas Sferraza, a member of NJASCD. "We try to figure out what's current in education and the needs of the staff.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Go to see Lean on Me, the box-office smash about controversial high school principal Joe Clark, and you're likely to witness a curious phenomenon: Teenagers who would bristle at having a disciplinarian like Clark running their school are cheering his screen image in theaters. "That's not surprising," says Norman Spencer, principal of Benjamin Franklin High School in North Philadelphia. "You can criticize the picture in part, but when you leave, you leave the theater with a good feeling.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In her 11 years as a social worker in the Phoenixville Area School District, Pat Brill saw a lot of troubled children - especially those who have an alcoholic or drug-addicted parent. The numbers alarmed her, particularly because research has shown that children of addicts are themselves likely to develop addictions. So more than a year ago, she decided to become an elementary school guidance counselor to help students who might be at risk. Toward that end, Brill can be found after school these days spending her free time in a classroom at Phoenixville High School learning about chemical dependencies and how as a counselor she can help keep students from becoming addicts or at least intervene if they do. She is one of the growing numbers of educators - teachers, administrators and counselors - who are turning to a six-year-old master's-level chemical- dependency counseling program offered at the Great Valley campus of Pennsylvania State University in Malvern.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elena Karpukhina, a social science professor and a member of the Soviet Communist Party Central Committee, deftly evaded the question. Karpukhina was one of 23 Soviet and U.S. educators who joined students at Philadelphia's William W. Bodine High School for International Affairs yesterday to exchange ideas across barriers of culture and ideology. The Soviets were asked for their impressions of capitalism. "The most important question is our impression about the American people," said Karpukhina.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Area educators saw alarming numbers in the results of the new state teacher tests published last week. But it was not merely the disparity in scores between white and black test- takers that troubled them. It was that so few blacks were among those tested. The test scores showed that 93 percent of the white test-takers and 57 percent of the black test-takers passed the battery of multiple-choice tests required for elementary and secondary teaching jobs in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | By Arlene Martin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Back from Beijing, Virginia Ritchie thinks about the thousands of bicycles, the street food stalls and repair shops, the bamboo frames of snowy laundry draping apartment blocks and, of course, the people - always the people. This week, she will try, through a slide presentation, to convey her impressions of her two-week trip to China. Ritchie is director of admissions and development at Haddonfield Friends School. She has a master's degree from Temple University and 23 years of experience in early-childhood education.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to the way charter schools are paid for teaching children in special-education classes, critics say Pennsylvania has been flunking basic math for years - and unfairly subtracting hundreds of millions of dollars from taxpayers' wallets. Last week, the Wolf administration took the first step in a case observers say could bring the issue to a head - a bid to block $24.7 million in charter payouts in the cash-strapped Chester Upland School District. Public school advocates say large charter school payouts are the result of faulty calculations that lawmakers and state officials have had a hard time erasing.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rapper Kendrick Lamar's "Alright" has become the black joy anthem of 2015. The lyrics, "We gon' be alright!" are chanted in protests, shouted at house parties, tweeted in solidarity, and spewed in fierce rebuttal. Now the proclamation of joy in the face of adversity is the inspiration behind the "Be Alright" college scholarship launched by Oogeewoogee.com . The Philly-based online publication, founded by entrepreneur Tom Stafford, is a "global multimedia outlet with an emphasis on Hip Hop and counterculture, and how those two intersect with society and current affairs," while stressing financial, technological, and multicultural unity.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five years ago, EdCamp was a seed of an idea, 10 Philadelphia-area educators in a room attempting to make traditional teacher training more meaningful and democratic. On Monday, the teachers' work - which has already been hailed as an international professional learning phenomenon - takes the spotlight. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is scheduled to announce a $2 million grant to the EdCamp Foundation. EdCamp specializes in "unconferences" - training sessions where participants dream up the discussion topics, attend only the sessions they're interested in, and serve as the experts they are, leading sessions in their area of interest.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
In some circles, Washington law professor Edgar S. Cahn, 80, is a social justice icon and poverty law pioneer whose many accomplishments changed the legal landscape. "The people who know him think he's a saint, but far too few people know him," said Martin Friedman, executive director of EducationWorks. Friedman and his local nonprofit, which runs after-school and social-justice programs in Philadelphia, Chester, and Camden, wants to change that. It hopes to increase Cahn's public profile in the region by awarding him EducationWorks' inaugural Social Justice Award at the National Constitution Center gala on Sept.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Laying down a position from which top Democrats will not back away, State Sen. Vincent Hughes said Thursday there would be no Pennsylvania budget without a Marcellus Shale tax and millions of dollars in new education spending. Heading into a second straight day of budget talks with Gov. Wolf and leaders of the four legislative caucuses, Hughes (D., Phila.) said falling state standardized test scores demonstrated a need for greater funding for schools across the state. Lawmakers and the governor are more than a month late in delivering a state spending plan.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Teachers are right, says Pennsylvania's education secretary, Pedro Rivera - the goalposts keep moving, and it's not fair to them. Based on standards that in some cases had students learning material that was a full year ahead of where they had been previously, state exams got tougher amid a period of steep decline in state aid. Scores, which have yet to be released publicly, dropped sharply, he said. And teachers will now be judged in part on student scores. In an interview late last week in Harrisburg, Rivera, a former Philadelphia teacher, principal, and union official who is now the state's top educator, said it brought to mind a "Peanuts" character.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry Hasheian, 77, of Chestnut Hill, an artist and educator, died Saturday, July 18, of a pulmonary embolism at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. He and his family were lifelong Philadelphia residents, and his work was known throughout the region. Mr. Hasheian said his drawings and paintings were influenced by the "raw, divine clumsiness" of the German Expressionists. In addition, the work of painters Wassily Kandinsky and Arshile Gorky, he said, allowed him to experiment with the "visually sophisticated doodle.
NEWS
July 28, 2015
HOW DOES A CITY make progress? That's never a simple proposition, especially in a city like ours. Political will is certainly a factor (as is citizen will), but even the most disciplined political will can be no match for a strong stand from the business community. For example, much of the reform of the city's tax structure over the years would not have happened without the business community; we doubt that major events like the pope's upcoming visit or the Democratic National Convention would be a reality without their participation, either.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
TWO MORE former Philadelphia educators have been implicated in the statewide test-cheating probe that began in 2011. Darlynn Gray and Ellen Berson, who were principal and assistant principal, respectively, at Delaplaine McDaniel Elementary in South Philadelphia, both surrendered their credentials earlier this year due to allegations they "violated the integrity and security of PSSA exams," according to a state Department of Education database....
NEWS
July 21, 2015
PHILADELPHIA'S future is dependent on the future of its children. Most parents know that. And most parents - rich, poor and middle-class - want a better life for their children. They also know, in their gut, that the path to that better life is an education. There is a vast aspiring class of parents in this city who spend an enormous amount of time and effort seeking a good education for their kids. They join the admissions lottery at charter schools. They sometimes move to be in the catchment area of a good public school.
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