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NEWS
February 14, 2016
The headline "School leaders angered by Wolf" (Wednesday) following the governor's unveiling of his 2016-17 budget was misleading. Wolf was elected with the help of educators and parents across the commonwealth with a clear mandate: Reverse the damage done to public education by former Gov. Tom Corbett and the Republican-led General Assembly. Lesser politicians would have used Republican obstructionism as an excuse to give up on that goal. By sticking to his principles and maintaining his promise to voters, he is showing leadership.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Educators are invited to learn more about the programs and facilities of the Mercer, Fonthill and James A. Michener Art Museums during an open house starting at 4:30 p.m. Oct. 29. The event will include an opportunity to visit the Michener's new wing and a free audio guide tour through the Mercer Museum. Also, staff from each of the institutions will introduce teachers to the museums' various services and activities. The free event is open to all educators. Reservations should be made by Wednesday.
NEWS
July 19, 2005 | By Debra P. DiLorenzo
Teaching is a challenging career that requires dedication, enthusiasm, stamina, a love for learning and much more. With the state Core Curriculum Content Standards, pressure to produce academic results, and constant assessment of the education provided by our public schools, the need for teachers to remain current in teaching methods is increasingly important. For these reasons, the participation of 28 teachers in the Chamber of Commerce Southern New Jersey's South Jersey Summer Institute for Educators program is commendable.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | By Yvette Ousley, Special to The Inquirer
The latest high-tech educational tool - a satellite dish and transmitting station - got favorable reviews at Monday's work session of the Great Valley school board. The so-called satellite-earth station proposal has been in the works for the last year, according to David Morgan, assistant superintendent of instruction. The proposal was drafted by George Martynick, a science and video communications teacher at Great Valley High School, and Betty Bernardin, chairwoman of the audio visual department.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Warrington, 77, of Yeadon, a longtime Philadelphia public school teacher and vice principal, died Thursday at Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital in Darby. Mr. Warrington began his career teaching history in Philadelphia's junior high schools. After 36 years in the public school system, including 10 years as vice principal of the John P. Turner Middle School in West Philadelphia, he retired in 1978. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Warrington graduated from Central High School in 1935.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | By Ovetta Wiggins, Special to The Inquirer
More than 400 teachers, administrators and college professors are expected to attend the spring conference of the N.J. Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development (NJASCD) at 3:30 p.m. tomorrow at Cinnaminson High School. Educators from Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties will discuss the most effective tools available in education. "The workshops give teachers a chance to get new information," said Nicholas Sferraza, a member of NJASCD. "We try to figure out what's current in education and the needs of the staff.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Go to see Lean on Me, the box-office smash about controversial high school principal Joe Clark, and you're likely to witness a curious phenomenon: Teenagers who would bristle at having a disciplinarian like Clark running their school are cheering his screen image in theaters. "That's not surprising," says Norman Spencer, principal of Benjamin Franklin High School in North Philadelphia. "You can criticize the picture in part, but when you leave, you leave the theater with a good feeling.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
Two former Philadelphia School District educators pleaded guilty this week to criminal charges stemming from accusations that they perpetuated a "culture of cheating" on standardized tests, the state Attorney General's Office said Wednesday. The pleas by former Cayuga Elementary principal Evelyn Cortez on Tuesday and former Cayuga teacher Jennifer Hughes on Wednesday marked the first convictions in the test-cheating scandal that resulted in the arrest of eight city educators. "We're pleased with the outcome, given the pleas required the defendants to take responsibility for their actions," said Jeffrey Johnson, a spokesman for the Attorney General's Office.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In her 11 years as a social worker in the Phoenixville Area School District, Pat Brill saw a lot of troubled children - especially those who have an alcoholic or drug-addicted parent. The numbers alarmed her, particularly because research has shown that children of addicts are themselves likely to develop addictions. So more than a year ago, she decided to become an elementary school guidance counselor to help students who might be at risk. Toward that end, Brill can be found after school these days spending her free time in a classroom at Phoenixville High School learning about chemical dependencies and how as a counselor she can help keep students from becoming addicts or at least intervene if they do. She is one of the growing numbers of educators - teachers, administrators and counselors - who are turning to a six-year-old master's-level chemical- dependency counseling program offered at the Great Valley campus of Pennsylvania State University in Malvern.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elena Karpukhina, a social science professor and a member of the Soviet Communist Party Central Committee, deftly evaded the question. Karpukhina was one of 23 Soviet and U.S. educators who joined students at Philadelphia's William W. Bodine High School for International Affairs yesterday to exchange ideas across barriers of culture and ideology. The Soviets were asked for their impressions of capitalism. "The most important question is our impression about the American people," said Karpukhina.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 16, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Fund schools equally As a former member of the Lower Merion school board, I disagree with the commentary about the controversies involving charter schools and student testing ("Can Real World and Education World get along?" Wednesday). Neither annual testing nor state-based curricular standards will help our young people learn. We already know that large numbers of students in Lower Merion test "advanced" and that too many students in the Philadelphia School District - whether in charter schools or traditional public schools - test "below basic.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Paul B. Winkler, 79, of Lawrenceville, N.J., the groundbreaking executive director of the New Jersey Commission on Holocaust Education from 1975 to May of this year, died of cancer on Tuesday, July 12, at his home. In March 1994, the New Jersey Senate adopted "an act regarding genocide education in the public schools. " It stated that "every board of education shall include instruction on the Holocaust and genocide in an appropriate place in the curriculum of all elementary and secondary school pupils.
NEWS
July 14, 2016
By Jonathan Zimmerman I live in two worlds. In one of them, Education World, there are angry and divisive battles over our public schools. But in the other one, known colloquially as the Real World, there's an enormous degree of consensus about them. Witness Hillary Clinton's recent speech to the National Education Association, the nation's largest teachers' union. It was a lovefest, for the most part, as Clinton endorsed higher teacher pay and the other standard items on the NEA's wish list.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: I know you provide a booklet to help teens with questions about sex. But when should I talk to my son or give him a copy? He will turn 9 soon. I know that is young, but kids today are exposed to so much so early. - Kristen in Maryland DEAR KRISTEN: You're absolutely right; they are. They also mature earlier than children of previous generations. That's why it is so important for parents - and guardians - to begin discussing subjects like alcohol, drugs, sex, and family values well before their children start experimenting.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Joel Legatt, 33, loves his job teaching math at Northeast High School. But he says the day-to-day life of a classroom instructor is like being an emergency-room doctor performing triage - minus the life-and-death situations: So much to do, and no time to sit back and think. That's one of the reasons Legatt and three Northeast colleagues are excited to have been selected for a coveted fellowship program at Stanford University designed to keep talented young high school educators from leaving the field.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Sister Helen St. Paul Herberich, 95, a member of the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia for 72 years, died of heart failure at Assisi House, the order's retirement home in Aston, Delaware County, on Sunday, July 3. Sister Helen was born Helen Christine Herberich in Philadelphia, where she attended St. Aloysius Parish School and graduated from John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School. She entered the convent in 1941 and took her first vows in 1944. At a time when the sciences attracted few women, she earned a bachelor's degree in biology from the Catholic University of America and a master's in biology from Villanova University.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
Less than a week before Camden County College's newly appointed president officially assumes his role, the county Board of Freeholders and the college board of trustees introduced Donald A. Borden to the community. Borden addressed county officials and faculty, staff, and students Thursday morning in Taft Hall at the college's Blackwood campus. The college appointed Borden as its fifth president April 5 and he will start Wednesday. "As long as I'm in this position, we will be student-centered.
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
Cheryl Bembery Darden, 69, a former social worker in the Philadelphia court system who devoted her career to helping children, died Thursday, June 9, in her home in Altadena, Calif., from complications of multiple myeloma, according to her family. A Philadelphia native, Ms. Bembery Darden spent her early career with the Common Plea Court Counseling and Referral Unit, working with children. She worked under Grace Nash, who had helped her and her sister find homes as teenagers after their grandmother could no longer care for them, said her sister, Sharon Bembery.
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, STAFF WRITER
Joanne Huntington Tunnell was a trailblazer, a fierce advocate for women's education known for her intelligence and independent spirit. "She was very opinionated, but not judgmental," said daughter Kathleen Handel. "She was always very understanding and tried to see things from your perspective. " Ms. Tunnell, 86, of West Chester, who with her husband started a fund to support education for girls, died Friday, June 17, of a heart attack at Paoli Hospital. Ms. Tunnell was born in Rochester, N.Y., and her family moved several times because of economic hardship during the Great Depression.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
In an unprecedented move, the CEOs of nine of Pennsylvania's 13 cyber charter schools have invited state Education Secretary Pedro Rivera to join them in a conversation on improving virtual education. Their letter, which was sent Thursday, came a week after three national pro-charter organizations released a report calling for improved oversight of cyber charters and cracking down on poorly performing ones nationwide. "Although none of the data in that report is new, and many of the recommendations are inappropriate or illegal in Pennsylvania, the basic premise that we could do more to assure the quality and accountability of cyber education is valid," said Reese Flurie, CEO of Harrisburg-based Commonwealth Charter Academy.
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