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NEWS
November 22, 1993 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sun is up in this worn steel town, just a holler from the Ohio line. Out her kitchen window, Elizabeth Smith can see the rusty sheds of the old Sharon Steel Works, its smokestacks idle for a year. All the big employers are gone now, and with them a lot of the small ones. Like her dad, like her husband, nearly a quarter of the people in Farrell are out of work. But for the moment, Smith has her eye on the future - on her 20-month-old twins, Idrais and Alise, playing on the carpet with an effervescent woman named Bonnie King.
NEWS
March 9, 2000 | By Tomoeh Murakami, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The test booklets arrived from the state Department of Education, sealed in boxes. After New Jersey's 93,000 eighth graders finish taking the statewide standardized tests today, the booklets will be packed up and sent back to the state. But it will not be educators in Trenton who will grade them. It will be temporary workers at a testing company in Durham, N.C. The writing portions of the Grade Eight Proficiency Assessment, now in its second year, will be graded by hundreds of employees at Measurement Inc., a company contracted by the state.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | By Karen D. Brown, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
South Jersey educators, fearing the worst after a season of deep budget cuts, were giddy yesterday at the news that more state aid is on the way. "I'm just ecstatic the State Supreme Court recognizes we have to be fair to all children," said Camden City Superintendent Roy J. Dawson Jr. Camden is one of four special-needs districts in South Jersey to be affected by yesterday's ruling, which will force the state to add $250 million to the...
NEWS
May 10, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kathleen Sligh's colleagues at Roxborough High call her "an education angel. " At George Washington High, Yvonne Schwiker is a "treasure and an inspiration," her principal said. Kareem Demetrius Edwards "helped me to realize that my potential as a student is more powerful than anything," one of his pupils at Parkway West High said. They are emblematic of excellent teachers citywide - men and women who spend nights and weekends on schoolwork, who dip into their own pockets for supplies, who take a personal interest in their students' lives.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2003 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's some good news for the Convention Center. A society of 6,000 educators has just decided to book a meeting there in 2009 - despite the political, legal and labor turmoil surrounding the building, which is one of Philadelphia's chief economic drivers. "We got the confirmation last week," said Jack P. Ferguson, the man charged with persuading major shows to book the center for meetings planned years in advance. The group asked not to be identified until all its members were notified that Philadelphia was chosen as the 2009 meeting site, he said.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | By Vicki McClure, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
George Crispin lets out a weary chuckle when questioned about the changes he has seen in education over the span of his 38-year career. Among the first teachers hired when Washington Township High School opened in 1962, Crispin plans to retire in December to tend his 8-acre farm and teach English part time at Rowan University. According to the Washington Township School District, Crispin is the last of the high school's original teachers to leave. "Teaching today is so much more demanding.
NEWS
October 16, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drawing from personal experience as a disruptive, underachieving student from a poor Los Angeles neighborhood, Eboni Wilson, the former principal of Chester High School, urged urban educators yesterday to raise the bar and give students the tools to reach it. In a keynote speech charged with passion and injected with his own poetry, Wilson tried to inspire about 100 educators at the Urban Education Conference at Penn's Landing to see the potential...
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Fifteen years ago, Harvard psychologist Howard Gardner became an educational guru with a near-cult status after he wrote Frames of Mind. He made the social judgment that there were seven kinds of intelligences: linguistic, musical, mathematical, spatial, kinesthetic (related to movement), intrapersonal and interpersonal. And his rigorous research clearly backed up his thinking. For many educators, Gardner had uncovered the factors that seemed to explain why students may excel at one subject but lag behind in others.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Joel Legatt, 33, loves his job teaching math at Northeast High School. But he says the day-to-day life of a classroom instructor is like being an emergency-room doctor performing triage - minus the life-and-death situations: So much to do, and no time to sit back and think. That's one of the reasons Legatt and three Northeast colleagues are excited to have been selected for a coveted fellowship program at Stanford University designed to keep talented young high school educators from leaving the field.
NEWS
March 4, 2016
ISSUE | BULLYING School got it wrong The Tacony Charter High School suspended and expelled a student for not reporting that he was being bullied ("Expelled student says he was bullied," Monday). This proves two things: These educators do not understand bullying, and they are bullies themselves. |I. Milton Karabell, Philadelphia
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