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Edward Cullen

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NEWS
November 13, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Expect a gaggle of tween girls at the King of Prussia mall today, and not because wide-leg jeans and pencil skirts are on sale. The stupendously cute Robert Pattinson, star of the new vampire movie, Twilight, and inciter of teen hysteria and a near-riot at a San Francisco mall this week, is scheduled to make an appearance. The mall expected fans to start lining up at midnight to get a chance to meet Pattinson, just as they did elsewhere on his nationwide mall tour to promote the movie, which will open Nov. 21. Those who aren't up to speed on the vampire/mortal saga should know this: The books by Stephenie Meyer have sold nearly 17 million copies, mostly to preteen and teenage girls who love the dashing and devoted Edward Cullen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2010 | By RAFER GUZMAN, Newsday
The "Twilight" franchise has kept fans riveted through three films now. And things are about to get interesting. So far, the story of teenager Bella Swan and her vampire boyfriend, Edward Cullen, has been tame: occasional violence, never sex. But "Breaking Dawn," the final book in Stephenie Meyer's popular series, veers into territory so extreme that even faithful readers were shocked. "Breaking Dawn" created a controversy that went largely unnoticed upon its release in August 2008, a few months before the first film generated widespread mania.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It won't be long now before teens across the globe take to the streets in sackcloth and ashes in mourning over Kristen Stewart's swan dive from media grace. K-Stew, whose romance with Twilight costar Robert Pattinson has helped us keep at bay the horrors of a world engulfed in poverty, war, and famine, admitted this week that she had engaged in what she called a "momentary indiscretion" with her married Snow White and the Huntsman director, Rupert Sanders. The fallout has been shocking: Fans, for the most part teenage girls, have unleashed a fury of disappointment and outrage, a wave of hysteria not seen since Sigmund Freud set up shop in Vienna.
NEWS
November 20, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'You're not in Phoenix anymore," Charlie Swann tells his teenage girl, Bella, welcoming her to the rain-drenched, vampire-pocked Pacific Northwest town of Forks, Wash. And if that line echoes a famous one from The Wizard of Oz , well, so be it, because in Twilight - the surefire hit adaptation of the first book from Stephenie Meyer's mega-selling saga - Bella Swann, like Dorothy Gale, is in for the ride of her life. A pheromone-drenched high school romance rife with heavy-duty Dracula stuff, Twilight - directed with savvy humor by Catherine Hardwicke - turns vampirism into a metaphor for teen lust.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"You're not in Phoenix anymore," Charlie Swann tells his teenage girl, Bella, welcoming her to the rain-drenched, vampire-pocked Pacific Northwest town of Forks, Wash. And if that line echoes a famous one from The Wizard of Oz, well, so be it, because in Twilight - the surefire hit adaptation of the first book from Stephenie Meyer's mega-selling saga - Bella Swann, like Dorothy Gale, is in for the ride of her life. A pheromone-drenched high school romance rife with heavy-duty Dracula stuff, Twilight - directed with savvy humor by Catherine Hardwicke - turns vampirism into a metaphor for teen lust.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
This review originally appeared Tuesday. The Twilight Saga: Eclipse - the third installment in the supernatural sexual-abstinence series that pits hot-blooded werewolves against cold-blooded vampires, with mopey-blooded Bella Swan in between - begins with a poem. It's Robert Frost's "Fire and Ice," and Bella (Kristen Stewart) recites it, splayed in a field of violets alongside her pallid beau, Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson). "Some say the world will end in fire," she says, "some say in ice. From what I've tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire . . . . " And that's as good (very good)
NEWS
November 20, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
LAST YEAR'S box-office sensation and poster child for small-town girls with chastity issues was Juno, the pregnant wisecracker. This year's is likely to be Bella Swan, already pop culture's most famous virgin, thanks to the phenomenally popular "Twilight" books, from which this film is adapted. Whether she maintains that status by design or necessity is open to question. As we see in "Twilight," her choices are limited mainly by the fact that her boyfriend is a vampire.
NEWS
June 28, 2010 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Twilight Saga: Eclipse - the third installment in the supernatural sexual-abstinence series that pits hot-blooded werewolves against cold-blooded vampires, with mopey-blooded Bella Swan in between - begins with a poem. It's Robert Frost's "Fire and Ice," and Bella (Kristen Stewart) recites it, splayed in a field of violets alongside her pallid beau, Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson). "Some say the world will end in fire," she says, "some say in ice. From what I've tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire . . . . " And that's as good (very good)
LIVING
October 25, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I'm a vampire, he's a vampire, won't you be a vampire too? Gee, thanks, Count. Thanks, but no. Despite being a lifelong vampire aficionado (um, does that sound creepy?), I'd rather be a vampire hunter right now. We're crypt-deep in vampires, thanks in part to an avalanche of mega-selling books and films, including Twilight, True Blood, the Underworld Trilogy, and their rapidly mutating spawn. Pop-cult trends don't usually last this long. After nearly two years, vamp craze continues to rage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It won't be long now before teens across the globe take to the streets in sackcloth and ashes in mourning over Kristen Stewart's swan dive from media grace. K-Stew, whose romance with Twilight costar Robert Pattinson has helped us keep at bay the horrors of a world engulfed in poverty, war, and famine, admitted this week that she had engaged in what she called a "momentary indiscretion" with her married Snow White and the Huntsman director, Rupert Sanders. The fallout has been shocking: Fans, for the most part teenage girls, have unleashed a fury of disappointment and outrage, a wave of hysteria not seen since Sigmund Freud set up shop in Vienna.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2010 | By RAFER GUZMAN, Newsday
The "Twilight" franchise has kept fans riveted through three films now. And things are about to get interesting. So far, the story of teenager Bella Swan and her vampire boyfriend, Edward Cullen, has been tame: occasional violence, never sex. But "Breaking Dawn," the final book in Stephenie Meyer's popular series, veers into territory so extreme that even faithful readers were shocked. "Breaking Dawn" created a controversy that went largely unnoticed upon its release in August 2008, a few months before the first film generated widespread mania.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
This review originally appeared Tuesday. The Twilight Saga: Eclipse - the third installment in the supernatural sexual-abstinence series that pits hot-blooded werewolves against cold-blooded vampires, with mopey-blooded Bella Swan in between - begins with a poem. It's Robert Frost's "Fire and Ice," and Bella (Kristen Stewart) recites it, splayed in a field of violets alongside her pallid beau, Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson). "Some say the world will end in fire," she says, "some say in ice. From what I've tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire . . . . " And that's as good (very good)
NEWS
June 28, 2010 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Twilight Saga: Eclipse - the third installment in the supernatural sexual-abstinence series that pits hot-blooded werewolves against cold-blooded vampires, with mopey-blooded Bella Swan in between - begins with a poem. It's Robert Frost's "Fire and Ice," and Bella (Kristen Stewart) recites it, splayed in a field of violets alongside her pallid beau, Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson). "Some say the world will end in fire," she says, "some say in ice. From what I've tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire . . . . " And that's as good (very good)
LIVING
October 25, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I'm a vampire, he's a vampire, won't you be a vampire too? Gee, thanks, Count. Thanks, but no. Despite being a lifelong vampire aficionado (um, does that sound creepy?), I'd rather be a vampire hunter right now. We're crypt-deep in vampires, thanks in part to an avalanche of mega-selling books and films, including Twilight, True Blood, the Underworld Trilogy, and their rapidly mutating spawn. Pop-cult trends don't usually last this long. After nearly two years, vamp craze continues to rage.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"You're not in Phoenix anymore," Charlie Swann tells his teenage girl, Bella, welcoming her to the rain-drenched, vampire-pocked Pacific Northwest town of Forks, Wash. And if that line echoes a famous one from The Wizard of Oz, well, so be it, because in Twilight - the surefire hit adaptation of the first book from Stephenie Meyer's mega-selling saga - Bella Swann, like Dorothy Gale, is in for the ride of her life. A pheromone-drenched high school romance rife with heavy-duty Dracula stuff, Twilight - directed with savvy humor by Catherine Hardwicke - turns vampirism into a metaphor for teen lust.
NEWS
November 20, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
'You're not in Phoenix anymore," Charlie Swann tells his teenage girl, Bella, welcoming her to the rain-drenched, vampire-pocked Pacific Northwest town of Forks, Wash. And if that line echoes a famous one from The Wizard of Oz, well, so be it, because in Twilight - the surefire hit adaptation of the first book from Stephenie Meyer's mega-selling saga - Bella Swann, like Dorothy Gale, is in for the ride of her life. A pheromone-drenched high school romance rife with heavy-duty Dracula stuff, Twilight - directed with savvy humor by Catherine Hardwicke - turns vampirism into a metaphor for teen lust.
NEWS
November 20, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
LAST YEAR'S box-office sensation and poster child for small-town girls with chastity issues was Juno, the pregnant wisecracker. This year's is likely to be Bella Swan, already pop culture's most famous virgin, thanks to the phenomenally popular "Twilight" books, from which this film is adapted. Whether she maintains that status by design or necessity is open to question. As we see in "Twilight," her choices are limited mainly by the fact that her boyfriend is a vampire.
NEWS
November 13, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Expect a gaggle of tween girls at the King of Prussia mall today, and not because wide-leg jeans and pencil skirts are on sale. The stupendously cute Robert Pattinson, star of the new vampire movie, Twilight, and inciter of teen hysteria and a near-riot at a San Francisco mall this week, is scheduled to make an appearance. The mall expected fans to start lining up at midnight to get a chance to meet Pattinson, just as they did elsewhere on his nationwide mall tour to promote the movie, which will open Nov. 21. Those who aren't up to speed on the vampire/mortal saga should know this: The books by Stephenie Meyer have sold nearly 17 million copies, mostly to preteen and teenage girls who love the dashing and devoted Edward Cullen.
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