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Edward Hopper

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NEWS
August 17, 1989 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Edward Hopper enjoyed a long association with the Whitney Museum of American Art, beginning with his first solo exhibition at the Whitney Studio Club in 1920, continuing through his inclusion in numerous museum Annuals and Biennials, and culminating in two retrospectives during his lifetime, in 1950 and 1964. Hopper's widow, Josephine, bequeathed his entire artistic estate of more than 2,500 works to the museum in 1968, the year after his death. The Whitney exhibited selections from the bequest in 1971, and drew on it for a third retrospective in 1980.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Perhaps it is the grating sound of its name. Or maybe it's because most people dismiss it as the place where traffic spills off at the west end of the Tappan Zee Bridge. Whatever the reason, Nyack, a quaint Victorian village carved into the cliffs of the Hudson River, just doesn't get any respect. When I mentioned to people that my sister and I were going to Nyack one weekend last fall, I got many skeptical looks. (Maybe they thought I said Newark?) Unlike many other Hudson River towns farther north that thrive on tourist trade, Nyack is quite satisfied with its anonymity.
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts has acquired a number of significant works by Hudson River School artists of the 19th century, as well as work by contemporary artists, including etchings by Sue Coe and David Lynch's first foray into a kind of filmmaking. Funds for the acquisitions, which totaled more than $2 million, were drawn from a number of sources, said Harry Philbrick, director of PAFA's museum. Acquisition of the etchings by Coe and an oil painting by Katherine Bradford marked the first time the academy has used funds generated by the sale of Edward Hopper's East Wind Over Weehawken , which fetched $40.5 million at a 2013 auction.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, owner of two signature oil paintings by American realist Edward Hopper, intends to sell one and plow the expected sizable proceeds into a fund largely for acquisition of contemporary art, officials have announced. The 1934 work, East Wind Over Weehawken , is a characteristically bleak streetscape, this one in North Jersey, of angular Victorian houses, tilted telephone and light poles, and almost insignificant figures; a prominent sign stands in the foreground, "For Sale" scrawled in vivid red across its face.
NEWS
September 3, 2013
To see an art treasure no more With all the horrible and frightening events in today's world, why, I ask myself, does the proposed sale of Edward Hopper's East Wind Over Weehawken by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts make me so very sad? Perhaps, because this represents society's callous dismissal of what is quiet and lovely for what is new and momentarily exciting. In art, as in life, what remains treasured is not the flash of the contemporary, but what is finely crafted and meaningful.
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware Art Museum is planning to sell as many as four unnamed paintings to cover $20 million in old construction debt and replenish its endowment funds, the museum said Wednesday. "After detailed analysis, heavy scrutiny, and the exhaustion of every reasonable alternative to relieve our bond debt, the trustees had two agonizing choices in front of them - to either sell works of art or to close our doors," museum chief executive Mike Miller said in a statement. "While today's decision is certainly hard to bear, the closure of this 100-year-old museum would be, by comparison, unbearable.
NEWS
September 9, 2003 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
At the last Fringe Festival, Rabid Rascal Productions staged an inventive, well-acted comedy called The Writer's Mind. Anticipating something as entertaining, I decided to see this year's Fieldwork. Not a good idea. In place of a multi-character, spirited work, Rabid Rascal offers a single actor alternately reading the text of and reciting by memory from published short stories that Joseph Capriotti based on his experiences traveling in Central America. Michael J. Ewing didn't bring much to his performance, and the first tale, an account of foreigners trying to score drugs in a seedy bar, barely held my interest.
NEWS
June 8, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
With consignments from the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Herbert Schiffer Antiques of West Chester, Pook & Pook's two-day antique sale next weekend is sure to attract serious buyers and collectors. But with a nice grouping of more affordable illustration art, the auction Friday and next Saturday at the Ludwigs Corner Fire Company will also appeal to the more casual auction-goer. The Art Museum consignments, being sold to benefit its Acquisitions Fund (according to the $35 catalog)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1990 | By Jennifer Crohn, Special to The Inquirer
Kurt Solmssen's paintings at Marian Locks gallery look similar in spirit to the work of Edward Hopper. Like Hopper, Solmssen is interested in the confluence of architecture and landscape, where shadows have as much weight and presence as objects. Both artists' figures appear as isolated characters in otherwise unpopulated places. But Solmssen's paintings are about twice the size of Hopper's better-known works, and despite similarities in the looseness of brushwork, generalization of shapes and overall composition (compare Cold Storage Plant by Hopper to Solmssen's Indian Summer)
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If some of the paintings in Jon Redmond's one-man show that opened last week at the Somerville-Manning Gallery here remind you of the late N.C. Wyeth, you're not mistaken. Redmond regards one painting in particular - Sway-back, an almost life-size rendering of a barn door bathed in moonlight - as a personal tribute to the Chadds Ford illustrator and painter. Redmond calls Wyeth a master of composition whose traditional landscapes and illustrations were often painted on the "monumental" scale.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts has acquired a number of significant works by Hudson River School artists of the 19th century, as well as work by contemporary artists, including etchings by Sue Coe and David Lynch's first foray into a kind of filmmaking. Funds for the acquisitions, which totaled more than $2 million, were drawn from a number of sources, said Harry Philbrick, director of PAFA's museum. Acquisition of the etchings by Coe and an oil painting by Katherine Bradford marked the first time the academy has used funds generated by the sale of Edward Hopper's East Wind Over Weehawken , which fetched $40.5 million at a 2013 auction.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anyone visiting the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts hoping to see both of its Edward Hopper paintings will be disappointed. The academy sold Hopper's East Wind Over Weehawken (1934) in December for $40.5 million to raise funds for other art. Only his Apartment Houses (1923) remains. A trip to St. Charles Borromeo Seminary on City Avenue to view its six Thomas Eakins oils will also disappoint. In March, the seminary announced the portraits will be sold to fund renovations.
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware Art Museum is planning to sell as many as four unnamed paintings to cover $20 million in old construction debt and replenish its endowment funds, the museum said Wednesday. "After detailed analysis, heavy scrutiny, and the exhaustion of every reasonable alternative to relieve our bond debt, the trustees had two agonizing choices in front of them - to either sell works of art or to close our doors," museum chief executive Mike Miller said in a statement. "While today's decision is certainly hard to bear, the closure of this 100-year-old museum would be, by comparison, unbearable.
NEWS
September 3, 2013
To see an art treasure no more With all the horrible and frightening events in today's world, why, I ask myself, does the proposed sale of Edward Hopper's East Wind Over Weehawken by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts make me so very sad? Perhaps, because this represents society's callous dismissal of what is quiet and lovely for what is new and momentarily exciting. In art, as in life, what remains treasured is not the flash of the contemporary, but what is finely crafted and meaningful.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, owner of two signature oil paintings by American realist Edward Hopper, intends to sell one and plow the expected sizable proceeds into a fund largely for acquisition of contemporary art, officials have announced. The 1934 work, East Wind Over Weehawken , is a characteristically bleak streetscape, this one in North Jersey, of angular Victorian houses, tilted telephone and light poles, and almost insignificant figures; a prominent sign stands in the foreground, "For Sale" scrawled in vivid red across its face.
NEWS
September 9, 2003 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
At the last Fringe Festival, Rabid Rascal Productions staged an inventive, well-acted comedy called The Writer's Mind. Anticipating something as entertaining, I decided to see this year's Fieldwork. Not a good idea. In place of a multi-character, spirited work, Rabid Rascal offers a single actor alternately reading the text of and reciting by memory from published short stories that Joseph Capriotti based on his experiences traveling in Central America. Michael J. Ewing didn't bring much to his performance, and the first tale, an account of foreigners trying to score drugs in a seedy bar, barely held my interest.
NEWS
June 8, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
With consignments from the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Herbert Schiffer Antiques of West Chester, Pook & Pook's two-day antique sale next weekend is sure to attract serious buyers and collectors. But with a nice grouping of more affordable illustration art, the auction Friday and next Saturday at the Ludwigs Corner Fire Company will also appeal to the more casual auction-goer. The Art Museum consignments, being sold to benefit its Acquisitions Fund (according to the $35 catalog)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Mary Frank, perhaps best known for her ceramic sculptures of fragmented figures, turned to painting in the mid-1980s because of health problems. The result is mixed. Frank's paintings are more emotionally charged than her sculptures, although not as visually powerful. Yet they confirm that her view of life is intrinsically poetic and expressed through mystical visions. A traveling exhibition of 31 paintings created since 1985, organized at the Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase, N.Y., has come to the Allentown Art Museum.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Perhaps it is the grating sound of its name. Or maybe it's because most people dismiss it as the place where traffic spills off at the west end of the Tappan Zee Bridge. Whatever the reason, Nyack, a quaint Victorian village carved into the cliffs of the Hudson River, just doesn't get any respect. When I mentioned to people that my sister and I were going to Nyack one weekend last fall, I got many skeptical looks. (Maybe they thought I said Newark?) Unlike many other Hudson River towns farther north that thrive on tourist trade, Nyack is quite satisfied with its anonymity.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Ordinarily one would look askance at a museum's giving one of its trustees a solo exhibition. But in the case of Katharine Steele Renninger, the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown passes muster. Renninger is the secretary of the museum board, but she's also a Bucks County painter of long standing and noticeable achievement. On that basis, she clearly deserves this retrospective. Renninger is a hard-core realist, a painter of architecture, objects and artifacts. Specifically, she is a painter of patterns, shadows and shapes.
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