CollectionsEffect
IN THE NEWS

Effect

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 14, 2009
CALL ME crazy, but it seems as though ever since Michael Vick came come to town, there are more and more cases of animal abuse. I cry myself to sleep at night watching the news. From Sticky the cat who was duct-taped to the pig of a human being who let her animals waste away in her home to the person who lit the tiny kitty on fire, I am just sick. Man is ruining the life of domesticated animals. They put so much trust in us to take care of them. And what does Philadelphia do?
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The juicy remnants of what is now Tropical Storm Andrea, now about to make landfall on the west coast of Florida, could douse the region with the heaviest rains since Oct. 29.  That was the date Sandy landed in New Jersey, and while this storm won't be remotely as dangerous as Sandy, forecasters say it has the potential to wring out up to 3 inches of rain across the entire region - and perhaps 5 inches in isolated areas. Flash-flood watches are in effect from late tonight through late Friday night.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Pennsylvania taxpayers might not notice, but paychecks soon should become a bit fatter because of a cut in the state personal income tax that takes effect Monday. Susan Cassel, spokeswoman for the Revenue Department, said yesterday that new withholding schedules had been mailed to all employers in the state. She said residents should get a slight increase in take-home pay when they are paid for next week's work. Under a bill approved by the governor and the General Assembly in early July, the personal income tax rate will drop on Monday from 2.2 percent to 2.1 percent.
NEWS
November 13, 2011 | By Howard Gillette
In May 1903, at the height of the Progressive Era, crusading journalist Lincoln Steffens published the fifth in a series of articles exposing municipal corruption in the United States. His subject was Philadelphia, and to his mind, it was worse than any other place he had investigated. "All our municipal governments are more or less bad," Steffens declared. "Philadelphia is simply the most corrupt and the most contented. " Steffens' reports helped launch a period of investigative reporting that President Theodore Roosevelt labeled "muckraking," but the phenomenon was otherwise quite compatible with his own reform orientation.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Steve Peoples and Ken Thomas, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Governors from both parties are warning of the damaging economic impact if the White House and Congress fail to reach a deal to stave off across-the-board spending cuts set to take effect Friday. "It's senseless, and it doesn't need to happen," Gov. Martin O'Malley (D., Md.) said during the annual meeting this weekend of the National Governors Association. "And it's a damn shame, because we've actually had the fastest rate of jobs recovery of any state in our region.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | Breaking New Desk
It's going to cost you more to take a taxi in Philadelphia starting today. A $1.25 per trip fuel surcharge went into effect at midnight. The Board of the Philadelphia Parking Authority,which regulates taxis in the city, approved the surcharge at its meeting April 23. The added cost will remain in effect until May 31. The PPD board will determine if the surcharge needs to be extended through June at its monthly meeting set for May...
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the persistence of the latest hot spell stokes health concerns, Philadelphia has reported the region's fifth heat-related death of the season. And the death toll is likely to rise before this is all over. Tomorrow the atmosphere will be holding its own July Fourth cookout as temperatures creep back toward the mid-90s. The National Weather Service has posted an "excessive heat warning" for the entire region in effect from 11 a.m. tomorrow until 6 p.m. Thursday. As the air swells with water vapor that will make a mockery of sweat, discomfort levels will rise along with thunderstorm chances.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | Ronnie Polaneczky
FOR MORE than a year, I've been chronicling the injustices of the Philadelphia Parking Authority and its sister agency, the Bureau of Administrative Adjudication.   When my columns hit print, though, their effect on the PPA and the BAA has been akin to that of a mosquito biting into a rhino's neck: Momentarily bothersome, but inconsequential. Too many phony-baloney tickets are still being written by enforcement agents. And too many of them are then upheld on appeal by BAA hearing examiners who dismiss reasonable evidence showing that those tickets were written in error.
NEWS
November 7, 2011
Will Pennsylvania's texting ban alter your behind-the-wheel habits when it takes effect?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a step toward filling an unmet medical need, an experimental drug completely reversed the blood-thinning effects of the anticoagulant Pradaxa "within minutes" of being given, according to early results from a international study. Pradaxa, or dabigatran, is among four newer anticoagulants prescribed to people with a common abnormal heart rhythm that puts them at risk of blood clots leading to stroke. While the novel pills do not require continual, inconvenient testing of blood levels like the age-old anticoagulant warfarin, they do not have an antidote to undo their effect in an emergency.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Samir Panthi saw television images of the mass destruction from earthquakes in Nepal, his homeland, he didn't sleep for days. The earthquakes April 25 and May 12 took the lives of more than 8,500 and left more than 19,000 injured. Months later, catastrophes such as earthquakes, tsunamis, and typhoons - often in developing nations - have an enormous effect on the labor pool in those countries and their ability to produce asinternational suppliersto customers as far away as Philadelphia, retail experts say. In Nepal's case, handwoven rugs - the country's leading export - and all those involved in the production process were adversely affected.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Vatican archbishop in charge of overseeing the World Meeting of Families, to be held in Philadelphia this year, is under investigation for possible embezzlement, according to several European news organizations. Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia, president of the Pontifical Council for the Family, reportedly bought the 14th-century San Girolamo castle in Umbria, Italy, at an artificially low price with the intention of reselling it at market value. "The alleged scam" would have netted a profit of about $4.4 million, the London newspaper the Daily Telegraph reported Friday.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jamer Hunt typically commutes from Center City to a teaching job at the Parsons School for Design in New York City four days a week on a 7:28 or 8:30 a.m. Amtrak train. After Hunt, 50, learned Tuesday night about the derailment of Amtrak Train 188 at Frankford Junction, he tried to take a bus Wednesday morning, but tickets were sold out. On Wednesday, he worked from home via Skype on his computer to videoconference with a fellow teacher and class of 20 students. "I was up on the big screen, and talking with the students," said the director of the graduate design program at Parsons as he waited in line for an 8:15 a.m. Megabus on Thursday in University City.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's paid-sick-leave law takes effect Wednesday, and city officials are encouraging workers to make sure their employers know about the new rules. Passed in February, the law requires employers with 10 or more workers to offer paid sick time. Employees who were not previously given sick leave can start accruing it at a rate of one hour of paid time per 40 hours worked. The law caps sick time at 40 hours a year, or five eight-hour days. Councilman William K. Greenlee, who pushed for the bill for more than three years, said the new law applies to 180,000 to 200,000 city residents.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one would chide a bald chemo patient for making bad decisions about her hair. But a stranger told one of Beth Eaby-Sandy's cancer patients - a woman whose treatment had made her skin turn bright red - that she "really should wear sunscreen. " The patient, who already felt conspicuous, was upset, said Eaby-Sandy, a nurse practitioner who works with lung cancer patients at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The stranger was rude, no doubt, but her ignorance is understandable.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a few days, surgeons at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia are scheduled to operate on the heart of Graziella Nobile's newborn baby, fixing a grave arterial defect that, if left unrepaired, would be fatal. The hospital lately has a stellar record on that type of operation, in the sense of getting patients home alive. From 2009 to 2012, the most recent data available, 60 infants had this surgery, called an arterial switch, and all survived. The part that doctors have yet to figure out completely is the brain.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The astronaut Scott Kelly is about to take off for the International Space Station, and if he is like some space travelers, he may temporarily feel a bit foggy or disoriented once in orbit. Scientists have not had much luck measuring this subtle effect with standard cognitive tests, but now, a group of University of Pennsylvania researchers is trying a new tack. While Kelly is in space, they will compare his mental performance with that of a uniquely qualified individual who stays behind on Earth.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Every nation, it seems, is devaluing its currency. The governments of Japan, Canada, the eurozone, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Russia, and some South American countries are all debasing their currencies - deliberately, to help their economies. What it does is make imports from those countries significantly cheaper than U.S. products. You don't have to be a genius to figure out that, as a result, demand for American products will slow and foreign imports will displace homegrown goods.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
If shopping malls are really dying - killed by retail apps, next-day delivery, and those giant "fulfillment centers" rising across Pennsylvania - you wouldn't know it. Not the way big investors like Simon Property Group are buying and selling rival shopping malls. On Monday, Simon - the Indianapolis company that owns one of the largest malls in the United States ( King of Prussia ) and the biggest in Philadelphia ( Philadelphia Mills , the former Franklin Mills) - offered $22 billion, or $91 a share, for national mall chain Macerich Co. , of Santa Monica, Calif.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|