CollectionsEgg Hunt
IN THE NEWS

Egg Hunt

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 2, 1991 | by Gloria Campisi and Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writers
It used to be that the East Germantown neighborhood was so quiet and safe you could sleep out on the porch on a hot summer night and be awakened not by horns and banging trucks, but by the chirping of birds. Older folk remember the block parties, the unlocked doors, the trust and security they had found when they moved there from more dangerous and crowded areas. But now, the peace has been shattered. Two slayings and one other mysterious death have come to East Germantown.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1995 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine for a moment the chickens of the world belonging to a union, say, the Fraternal Order of Pullets, or the Amalgamated Cluckers International, or the Brotherhood of Egg-Layers, Fryers and Roasters. Let's say said chickens were really unhappy: dirty coops, foxes raiding the henhouse, accusations of featherbedding. And, of course, the high attrition. The weekend before Easter would be the perfect time for a strike, wouldn't it? No eggs means no Easter egg hunts. No wretched egg puns, on the order of "eggstravaganza" and "eggcellent.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kingsway Church in Cherry Hill used to host a modest Easter egg hunt, by Pastor Bryon White's standards: about 3,000 eggs and 400 kids and parents. White, however, had been harboring greater ambitions. "I kind of had this grand vision of 25,000 eggs," he said. When he shared his idea with staff at the Assembly of God church before last Easter, "people looked at me like I was insane," White said. He now presides over what he believes to be Cherry Hill's largest egg hunt. On Saturday, volunteers from Kingsway will scatter 30,008 plastic eggs across the Cherry Hill High School West football field.
NEWS
March 30, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kingsway Church in Cherry Hill used to host a modest Easter egg hunt, by Pastor Bryon White's standards: about 3,000 eggs, and 400 children and parents. White, however, had been harboring greater ambitions. "I kind of had this grand vision of 25,000 eggs," he said. When he shared his idea with staff at the Assembly of God church before last Easter, "people looked at me like I was insane," White said. He now presides over what he believes to be Cherry Hill's largest egg hunt.
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A family egg hunt for children with developmental disabilities will be held at 10:30 a.m. Saturday at Rose Tree Park. Peter Rabbit will hide the brightly colored eggs and will be available for photos. Children must take a basket or container. Registration is required. The park is on Route 252 in Media. Call 610-325-3950. Rain date is Sunday. Lunch with the Easter Bunny will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Media firehouse. Meet the big furry guy and win prizes. Admission is $2.50 for children and $3 for adults.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's hunting season. This time of year, the game is Easter eggs. And this weekend, the hunt is on at Fort Mifflin, Historic RittenhouseTown, and West Laurel Hill Cemetery. A cemetery might seem an odd place for an egg hunt, but that's just the point. "People get the impression that cemeteries are creepy," says Christine Nicholas, marketing assistant for West Laurel Hill and Bringhurst Funeral Home, which is on the cemetery's Bala Cynwyd grounds. "We want . . . the public to come and see our beautiful grounds and feel more comfortable.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | For The Inquirer / DAN Z. JOHNSON
All ears - and smiles. Mariah DiPilla holds the Easter bunny she won in an egg hunt in Florence Township. The hunt was held on the front lawn of high school by the Student Council. Mariah, ready for holiday, was sitting on the curb outside the school. The hunt was the sixth one held by the council.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer / JILL ANNA GREENBERG
THE MAD DASH for Easter eggs began Sunday at an egg hunt sponsored by the Bensalem Parks and Recreation Board. Frank Peranteau of the board distributed the eggs on the Township Building lawn, and Ed Zielanski, director of township parks and recreation, wielded a bullhorn as he gave instructions to the children. They were out of the gate in a scramble, their enthusiasm easily propelling them past the Easter Bunny.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | By Peter Landry, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the twilight of Easter Sunday, the 5-year-old was foraging for goodies in a neighborhood egg hunt. What she found was no goody. It was a human arm sticking out of a shallow grave. The grim discovery on the grounds of the former Harriet Tubman Center in East Germantown ended the festivities for the little girl and her friends in the 700 block of East Locust Avenue. And before the day's last light was lost, investigators determined that the decomposing body had been buried inside the fence of the neighborhood landmark for some time and probably was a woman.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
It's Easter Bunny time again, and throughout Delaware County, the furry spring visitor has scheduled stops to listen to youngsters' requests for holiday treats from jelly beans to chocolate bunnies at malls and shopping centers. Listed are a few of the stops on the bunny's itinerary and other Easter events: Lunch with the Easter Bunny, McDonald's Restaurant, 2711 MacDade Blvd., Holmes, from noon to 4 p.m. today. A visit with the Easter Bunny, MacDade Mall, MacDade Boulevard and South Avenue, Holmes, from noon to 5 p.m. today, and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here comes Peter Cottontail, hopping down the bunny trail, hippity-hopping - hey, Easter's not just on its way, it's here! Though for many kids the main event is the candy delivery - try not to eat it all before breakfast - there's plenty of stuff to do out and about, both before and on the big day itself (after you've checked out your basket, of course).   Get dressed up Once a staple of Rittenhouse Square, Philadelphia's Easter Promenade has long had a happy home on South Street in the Headhouse District.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the red-tailed hawk laid her first egg last Monday, birders knew they were in for an Easter egg treat. In each of the last four springs, the hawk, known as a formel haggard but called "Mom" by her fans, laid three eggs three days apart. If the pattern continued, Monday's egg would be followed by a second on Thursday, which it was. And as hawk watchers monitored a webcam feed streamed online by the Franklin Institute, they saw a third egg appear Sunday morning. "You can see things happen that you're not really supposed to see, because normally these nests are at the top of pine trees or at the top of cliffs," said Della Micah, a self-described hawk fanatic.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the mother red-tailed hawk laid her first egg last Monday, birdwatchers knew they were in for an Easter egg treat. Each of the past four springs, the hawk, known as a formel haggard but called "Mom" by her fans, laid three eggs, three days apart. If the pattern continued, Monday's egg would be followed by a second on Thursday - which indeed came. And as hawk watchers monitored a webcam feed streamed online by the Franklin Institute, they saw a third egg appear Sunday morning.
NEWS
March 30, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kingsway Church in Cherry Hill used to host a modest Easter egg hunt, by Pastor Bryon White's standards: about 3,000 eggs, and 400 children and parents. White, however, had been harboring greater ambitions. "I kind of had this grand vision of 25,000 eggs," he said. When he shared his idea with staff at the Assembly of God church before last Easter, "people looked at me like I was insane," White said. He now presides over what he believes to be Cherry Hill's largest egg hunt.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kingsway Church in Cherry Hill used to host a modest Easter egg hunt, by Pastor Bryon White's standards: about 3,000 eggs and 400 kids and parents. White, however, had been harboring greater ambitions. "I kind of had this grand vision of 25,000 eggs," he said. When he shared his idea with staff at the Assembly of God church before last Easter, "people looked at me like I was insane," White said. He now presides over what he believes to be Cherry Hill's largest egg hunt. On Saturday, volunteers from Kingsway will scatter 30,008 plastic eggs across the Cherry Hill High School West football field.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The Diggity Dudes four-member band, who play hip music for hip kids, are known for their infectious grooves and will bring their show to the World Cafe Live in Wilmington on Saturday. Their songs, combining melody and humor, are about kid-centric topics, but are adult-friendly. In 2011, the title track from their debut album, My Science Project , ranked No. 3 on WXPN's Kids Corner Philadelphia's top songs of the year. The performance starts at 11:30 a.m.   The Diggity Dudes, 11:30 a.m. Saturday at World Cafe Live at the Queen, 500 N. Market St., Wilmington.
NEWS
April 24, 2011
For after the egg hunt, a quiz on Easter traditions. 1. The word Easter is believed to be derived from the name of a goddess of the dawn from this culture. a. Celtic. b. Roman. c. Anglo-Saxon. d. Greek. 2. The delivery of Easter eggs seems to have begun in areas of Europe now part of this country. a. France. b. Russia. c. Italy. d. Germany. 3. What do eggs and rabbits symbolize? a. Spring.
NEWS
April 18, 2006 | By Jennifer Martinez INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Thousands of children swarmed the South Lawn of the White House yesterday, pushing eggs across soggy grass with large spoons and hunting for hidden ones. "Welcome to this happiest of traditions at the White House," said Laura Bush, who was wearing a raincoat, as was her husband, on a cold, rainy morning. "In Washington, we know that spring has arrived when the White House lawn is filled with children for the Easter-egg hunt. " With that, President Bush blew the opening whistle on a century-old tradition, with a new wrinkle: Sprinkled among the supervising, photo-shooting, toddler-dragging parents this time were about 100 gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender couples and their children.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2005 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a busy time of year for the Easter Bunny, so why just hop along the bunny trail when you can ride the rails? The furry, friendly one will visit with children on the New Hope & Ivyland Railroad this weekend and next. Riders will get a treat from Mr. Bunny as the steam engine leads 50-minute nonstop rides from New Hope to Lahaska and back. Pictures with the whiskery celeb, along with refreshments, will be available for purchase on the 1920s locomotive. Even if your kids are past the Easter Bunny stage, not to worry, says Suzy Rigby, the railroad's passenger agent.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's hunting season. This time of year, the game is Easter eggs. And this weekend, the hunt is on at Fort Mifflin, Historic RittenhouseTown, and West Laurel Hill Cemetery. A cemetery might seem an odd place for an egg hunt, but that's just the point. "People get the impression that cemeteries are creepy," says Christine Nicholas, marketing assistant for West Laurel Hill and Bringhurst Funeral Home, which is on the cemetery's Bala Cynwyd grounds. "We want . . . the public to come and see our beautiful grounds and feel more comfortable.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|