CollectionsEgg Rolls
IN THE NEWS

Egg Rolls

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 19, 1999 | By Adrienne Lu, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Egg rolls are generally a humble lot, born to whet the appetite for the more glorious entrees to follow. But don't tell that to Nipa Hammond. Her egg rolls dare to be different. There's the ham-and-cheese egg roll. The pepperoni-and-cheese. The lobster egg roll. Banana. Apple. Scrambled egg and cheese. And the newest addition, the Mexican egg roll, with black beans, rice and jalapeno peppers. Fifteen kinds altogether, and only a few have traditional ingredients such as pork, shrimp or cabbage.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
A dozen places to get your cheesesteak on, kinda: Sampan: Bao buns (Cantonese dumplings), $7. 124 S. 13th St., 215-732-3501, sampanphilly.com. Iron Hill Brewery: Egg rolls, $10.95. Multiple locations, ironhillbrewery.com. Noir: Pot pie, $12. 1909 E. Passyunk Ave., 267-319-1678, noirphiladelphia.com. Del Frisco's: Dumplings, $16. 1426-1428 Chestnut St., 215-246-0533, delfriscos.com. Sullivan's: Egg rolls, $13. 700 W. Dekalb Pike, King of Prussia, 610-878-9025, sullivanssteakhouse.com.
FOOD
January 3, 1996 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
The reason no one has tried to build a fast-food franchise empire around Chinese cuisine is because the concept is redundant. Things like fried chicken, spaghetti or hamburgers work because normally they are not prepared quickly. People who go to the Colonel's or McDonald's or Sbarro are willing to give up a little on flavor to get the meal fast. But Chinese food is already fast. Any strip-mall Chinese restaurant can deliver a Kung Pao chicken in eight minutes. Now comes a franchiser out of New Jersey named China Jump, which opened its first shop across from the Montgomeryville Mall a couple months ago and plans to add 15 stores in the Philadelphia area by the end of 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1990 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
Comparing tangerine beef with beef two delights, is that like comparing apples and oranges? Kumquats and cucumbers? Rating Chinese takeout food is an art, not a science, the Daily News has discovered. It seemed like a noble project. There are weekend nights at the shore when you're too sunburned, too weary, too large a group, to go out to dinner. So, you order takeout. We chose Peking Duck House (in the heart of Atlantic City if Atlantic City had a heart), the new Royal Garden in Ventnor and the highly-touted Pearl Garden on the Black Horse Pike.
NEWS
April 5, 1988 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
Opening-night tradition demands the best face forward, and at the Vet this evening Phillies fans will find a stadium that has been applying the makeup for months. "We've installed 131,000 square feet of new AstroTurf Eight, and some 25,000 square feet of non-skid rubber warning track," said Greg Grillone, assistant manager at Veterans Stadium. Stadium painters also have been busy, going through hundreds of gallons of paint to brighten seating areas and concourses, and to give new sparkle to the home run fence.
NEWS
July 10, 1993 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
EGGSACTLY HOW HOT IS IT? THIS IS NO YOLK It's a dirty job, but some newspaper's got to do it. Thank goodness it was someone other than us - in this case the Washington Post. And what the minions of the highly respected journal that cracked Watergate discovered on Thursday was that even in triple-digit heat, you cannot crack an egg and fry it on the sidewalk. Nor can you do so on the roof of a gray Chevy Cavalier registered to the Russian Embassy, reporters determined. The roof slopes, so no matter how hot it is, the egg rolls down the side of the window and then seeps into the space where that gray fuzzy stuff meets the chrome.
NEWS
January 15, 2001 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chinese New Year is still 10 days away, but the dragon was already dancing in the streets of Chinatown yesterday. Driven by the beat of cymbals and drums, the multicolored puppet, held aloft by students from Cheung's Hung Gar Kung Fu Academy, sprinted and sashayed past crowded restaurants, sidewalk vegetable stands, and knots of families out for a Sunday stroll. The small parade - which began with a flurry of firecrackers at Ninth and Race Streets and ended with a block party offering hot dogs and egg rolls - was Chinatown's version of a victory celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
At 11 a.m. each day, the dim-sum carts start rolling at Chin's, one of the newer Chinatown restaurants that specialize in Cantonese food as it is prepared in Canton and Hong Kong. "Our menu is 100-percent Cantonese," one of the owners told me a while back. "It is Hong Kong style. Some say Cantonese is mixed-up American style. Sometimes that is true. Like the egg roll. We don't have egg rolls. We have spring rolls. And chop suey is American-Cantonese, all mixed up with vegetables.
NEWS
October 31, 1988 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Bright ideas flew thick and fast at a dance concert given by Leah Stein and Jennie Diggs at the Group Motion Studio in Center City on Saturday night and repeated last night. Just about all of the five pieces on the program had moments of genuine wit, but if there was one dance wittier than the others, it was Stein's Fresh Eggs. A carton of eggs lies on the floor. Stein also lies on the floor, with an egg perched on her back. She lifts her head high in the air, then her rump. The egg rolls up and down her back until, finally, splat!
NEWS
April 12, 1988 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
As construction workers knelt to put the finishing touches on a concrete sidewalk yesterday on the east side of 15th Street, south of Chestnut, the building manager of the corner property stood anxiously waiting for the mix to set. A section completed last week at a side entrance to the Packard Building already had tire marks on it. Chris Derasmo had seen it with his own eyes. "I said, 'Yo! This cement isn't even dry yet,' " Derasmo said, shaking his head. "These are the kind of problems we are having.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 12, 2013
A dozen places to get your cheesesteak on, kinda: Sampan: Bao buns (Cantonese dumplings), $7. 124 S. 13th St., 215-732-3501, sampanphilly.com. Iron Hill Brewery: Egg rolls, $10.95. Multiple locations, ironhillbrewery.com. Noir: Pot pie, $12. 1909 E. Passyunk Ave., 267-319-1678, noirphiladelphia.com. Del Frisco's: Dumplings, $16. 1426-1428 Chestnut St., 215-246-0533, delfriscos.com. Sullivan's: Egg rolls, $13. 700 W. Dekalb Pike, King of Prussia, 610-878-9025, sullivanssteakhouse.com.
FOOD
October 15, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cao Bong Thi, 73, marked the annual Moon Festival earlier this month just as she would have in her native Vietnam - by eating her favorite foods in the company of family and friends. After days spent shopping and chopping, Bong made 125 egg rolls and enough servings of bun sau, a stir-fried vegetable dish served over steamed rice noodles, to feed all the 100 people celebrating at the Nationalities Senior Center at 11th and Rockland Streets in Logan. Usually, 50 or more men and women - refugees and immigrants from Southeast Asia in their late 70s and early 80s - attend programs and eat lunch at this senior center, which rents space in the basement of a Presbyterian church.
NEWS
September 30, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
How suitably metaphoric that as the egg's good name has been restored the chicken (in the best-practices world) has been uncaged, liberated to live free and gift us with eggs worthy of their new and decriminalized status. Crack one in the pan. The yolk stands tall and saffron; the white clean and, to the taste, fetchingly sweet: The pride, clearly, is back - and the prodigal, rich-egg flavor! I'm not sure which came first. Maybe those farmstead eggs - Farmer Barb's and Mrs. Wickersham's and Bob the Farmer's - were there all along, an alternate egg universe I couldn't see, so averted were my eyes from egg-dom: To ingest one, at my cholesterol level, was to click off the safety in Russian roulette - like putting a pullet in my brain.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2003 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
ALL THAT'S left of last week's maiden trip to Trader Joe's is a bit of chocolate croissant icing crusted on a yellow bread plate. That's not completely true. There are also two boxes of instant Indian meals, a bag of pasta, frozen egg rolls, veggie burger patties, one lemon yogurt, and half a jar of mayo. But for the moment, let's focus on the chocolate icing. Or, what came before the chocolate icing. The chocolate croissant. I don't consider myself obsessed with most foods.
NEWS
January 15, 2001 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chinese New Year is still 10 days away, but the dragon was already dancing in the streets of Chinatown yesterday. Driven by the beat of cymbals and drums, the multicolored puppet, held aloft by students from Cheung's Hung Gar Kung Fu Academy, sprinted and sashayed past crowded restaurants, sidewalk vegetable stands, and knots of families out for a Sunday stroll. The small parade - which began with a flurry of firecrackers at Ninth and Race Streets and ended with a block party offering hot dogs and egg rolls - was Chinatown's version of a victory celebration.
NEWS
May 19, 1999 | By Adrienne Lu, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Egg rolls are generally a humble lot, born to whet the appetite for the more glorious entrees to follow. But don't tell that to Nipa Hammond. Her egg rolls dare to be different. There's the ham-and-cheese egg roll. The pepperoni-and-cheese. The lobster egg roll. Banana. Apple. Scrambled egg and cheese. And the newest addition, the Mexican egg roll, with black beans, rice and jalapeno peppers. Fifteen kinds altogether, and only a few have traditional ingredients such as pork, shrimp or cabbage.
FOOD
January 3, 1996 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
The reason no one has tried to build a fast-food franchise empire around Chinese cuisine is because the concept is redundant. Things like fried chicken, spaghetti or hamburgers work because normally they are not prepared quickly. People who go to the Colonel's or McDonald's or Sbarro are willing to give up a little on flavor to get the meal fast. But Chinese food is already fast. Any strip-mall Chinese restaurant can deliver a Kung Pao chicken in eight minutes. Now comes a franchiser out of New Jersey named China Jump, which opened its first shop across from the Montgomeryville Mall a couple months ago and plans to add 15 stores in the Philadelphia area by the end of 1996.
NEWS
April 28, 1995 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
The family hung an extension cord out the window, and Ba Ngoai was in business. Frying up egg rolls on the sidewalk on her electric stove beat the loneliness of watching TV all day in a strange language. Ba Ngoai, Vietnamese for "grandmom," quickly became the first Vietnamese vendor at the Italian Market, her granddaughter, Tanya Thanh-Hong Nguyen, says lovingly. "Then we learn it's illegal to sell egg roll without a license. It wasn't like Vietnam. " It has been 20 years since Nguyen and her family fled Vietnam days before the April 30, 1975, fall of Saigon.
NEWS
July 4, 1994 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the corner of Second and South Streets, Ken Berkeley was teaching people how to fall down. "If you're going to fall, this is how you save yourself," said Berkeley, dropping to his knees: "on your kneepads and on your wrist guards. " The students, all wearing borrowed skates, practiced falling. Then they tapped their gear back in place and began a slow roll down Second, where a few of them - stumbling and dropping to the pavement - immediately used the techniques they had just learned.
NEWS
July 10, 1993 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
EGGSACTLY HOW HOT IS IT? THIS IS NO YOLK It's a dirty job, but some newspaper's got to do it. Thank goodness it was someone other than us - in this case the Washington Post. And what the minions of the highly respected journal that cracked Watergate discovered on Thursday was that even in triple-digit heat, you cannot crack an egg and fry it on the sidewalk. Nor can you do so on the roof of a gray Chevy Cavalier registered to the Russian Embassy, reporters determined. The roof slopes, so no matter how hot it is, the egg rolls down the side of the window and then seeps into the space where that gray fuzzy stuff meets the chrome.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|