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Egg Salad

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NEWS
February 7, 1998 | By Bob Goldman
You probably haven't noticed it, but there's been something of a dust-up in the media lately abouts-e-x in high places. No matter what the truth turns out to be, the story paints a rather sordid picture of office life in what we might think of as our first corporation. Think about it: Would junior members of your firm be running around the executive suite at all hours of the night? Would senior managers send gifts to nubile employees? No way! In today's tough, competitive business environment, senior managers are too busy covering their own behinds to be interested in anyone else's.
NEWS
January 8, 1996 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carol Kaplan hoped against hope. All night, she stayed up and cooked and cooked some more, praying that somehow the snow wouldn't be so bad and the long-planned Torah Fund Brunch of the Germantown Jewish Centre could go on as planned. As the forecasts worsened and the white stuff actually began to fall, Kaplan shifted into high gear. Maybe the people bringing the kugels would be snowbound, she thought, so she cooked two extra kugels. Same for the cake people. So she baked a cake at 1 a.m. And just in case the brunch couldn't be held at all - well, Kaplan didn't want to be stuck with six salmon mousses.
FOOD
November 3, 2011
A trip to the United Kingdom, where fast - but fresh and light - sandwich shops rule, inspired Capogiro owner Stephanie Reitano to create this new line for her gelateria. Ingredients are high-quality (eggs from Green Meadow Farm, ham from Lancaster), the packaging is sleek, and all the sandwiches are about 400 calories and made fresh daily. Pick one up with your morning coffee and score a meal deal. There's BLT, egg salad, ham or turkey with cheese, and tuna.   - Ashley Primis $5-$5.45, available at the 20th St., University of Pennsylvania, and 13th St. Capogiro locations, capogirogelato.com .
FOOD
August 30, 1995 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
If you're in the market for a starter cookbook, you can't do better than Elaine Corn's "Now You're Cooking: Everything a Beginner Needs to Know to Start Cooking Today" (Harlow & Ratner, $24.95). The book has won every major award in its class this year, including a James Beard Award, a Julia Child Cookbook Award and "best general cookbook" from the International Association of Culinary Professionals. What makes this book ideal for the culinarily challenged is its ability to explain rock-bottom basics in clear, reassuring language.
FOOD
March 18, 1992 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
As the author of 16 cookbooks I'm often interviewed for and asked about my favorite recipes, but today's interviewer wanted his favorite recipes: specifically tunafish sandwiches. He was putting together a cookbook and had already cut out all the pictures. He's 8 years old. It started me thinking about tuna salad, egg salad and other sandwich fillings. The recipe is rarely found in cookbooks - too simple - yet the taste, texture, nutrition and calorie counts will vary dramatically depending on the ingredients, the proportions and how they're mixed together.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
The alluring window display at Pour Vous, a truly French butcher shop in Center City, stops passersby in their tracks. I have not seen a food shop display its wares this lovingly since my last trip to France. There are fat, fancy sausages lying in wait for the backyard grill, meat spreads sculpted into bird shapes, fresh take-away sandwiches and pastries to sigh for. French is spoken here; owner Marc Pauvert answers the telephone with a cheery, "Bonjour. " This spotless charcuterie also sells soups, salads, breads, cooked meats and gorgeous raw cuts, some already prepared as chicken cordon bleu or stuffed lamb chops.
NEWS
May 29, 2003 | By Jillian McKoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whoever dyed the city's JFK Plaza fountain water an eye-catching neon pink last week did more than just pull a prank - he or she may have started a colorful trend. Instead of irritating city officials, the fountain's pink water amused some of them, even Mayor Street. He has suggested coloring the water on other occasions, such as the Fourth of July. "We're looking into what can be done, because doing something like that brings energy and vibrance to the city," said city Managing Director Philip R. Goldsmith.
FOOD
October 23, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Our refuse company wishes us to remove labels and wash our cans before recycling. Removing the label is no problem, but rinsing every can by hand is too wasteful of water. That's why I put the can, with lid attached, in my dishwasher with all the other dirty dishes. And I use my fabric softener sheets more than once. Usually, they work through three drying cycles. - Linda Dear Polly: Keep a few absorbent towels or rags in your garage. After driving your car home in the rain, towel it off. The result: a rain- washed car!
FOOD
June 20, 1990 | By Deborah Licklider, Daily News Staff Writer
To egg or not to egg, that is the question. Should potato salad contain hard-boiled eggs? Naturally, it's a matter of preference. My preference? I say, if you want egg salad, make egg salad. If you want potato salad, forget about eggs. Although I'm not saying I'm right, you will notice that most potato salad recipes don't list hard-boiled eggs as an ingredient. Some list it as an optional ingredient. And contemporary recipes rarely include hard-boiled eggs, perhaps in response to cholesterol warnings and the egg-o-phobia they've spawned.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Let's think about eggs. Really think about them. What they were meant for. What they were not meant for. Eggs. They sustain life, don't they? Life emerges from them. And they can keep you alive - happy, even - in any number of ways. Omelets, say. Egg salad. Quiche! Eggs Benedict! But mankind, never satisfied, persists in carrying things too far. Somebody, for example, actually came up with this riddle of applied engineering. Call it, for reasons that will become clear, the Humpty Dumpty conundrum: What's the safest (for the egg, that is)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
March 29, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Mariah Bey was the first to arrive in the kitchen for our third cooking lesson. "Hellooooo," she crooned, throwing her arms wide open to announce herself. "What are we cooking today?" "Omelets," I said. "And you get to decide what to put in. I have lots of choices: mushrooms, peppers, greens, cheese, tomatoes. And we're also going to dye eggs for Easter. " "We're going to dye eggs!" she cried, her eyes filling with excitement. "This is the best cooking class ever!" I've been cooking once a week with fifth- and sixth-grade girls from St. Martin de Porres school in North Philadelphia, with the goal of improving not only their culinary skills but also their nutrition with easy meals they can make themselves.
FOOD
March 22, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Every culture has culinary rituals to herald the arrival of spring and celebrate the abundance and renewal of the season. For Jews that is the holiday of Passover, also known as the festival of spring, which begins each year with a festive meal on the first full moon following the vernal equinox - March 25 this year. Family and friends gather to read, sing, and eat traditional and symbolic foods to recount the exodus from Egypt, the move from slavery to freedom.
FOOD
November 3, 2011
A trip to the United Kingdom, where fast - but fresh and light - sandwich shops rule, inspired Capogiro owner Stephanie Reitano to create this new line for her gelateria. Ingredients are high-quality (eggs from Green Meadow Farm, ham from Lancaster), the packaging is sleek, and all the sandwiches are about 400 calories and made fresh daily. Pick one up with your morning coffee and score a meal deal. There's BLT, egg salad, ham or turkey with cheese, and tuna.   - Ashley Primis $5-$5.45, available at the 20th St., University of Pennsylvania, and 13th St. Capogiro locations, capogirogelato.com .
NEWS
May 29, 2003 | By Jillian McKoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whoever dyed the city's JFK Plaza fountain water an eye-catching neon pink last week did more than just pull a prank - he or she may have started a colorful trend. Instead of irritating city officials, the fountain's pink water amused some of them, even Mayor Street. He has suggested coloring the water on other occasions, such as the Fourth of July. "We're looking into what can be done, because doing something like that brings energy and vibrance to the city," said city Managing Director Philip R. Goldsmith.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | By Bob Goldman
You probably haven't noticed it, but there's been something of a dust-up in the media lately abouts-e-x in high places. No matter what the truth turns out to be, the story paints a rather sordid picture of office life in what we might think of as our first corporation. Think about it: Would junior members of your firm be running around the executive suite at all hours of the night? Would senior managers send gifts to nubile employees? No way! In today's tough, competitive business environment, senior managers are too busy covering their own behinds to be interested in anyone else's.
FOOD
August 20, 1997 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
'Simplicity is everything. " With that brief acceptance speech, chef John Kennedy summed up his approach to food. His remark also may reflect the judges' collective thinking in choosing Kennedy as winner of the Great American Salad Toss competition this month. Kennedy's artful composition of heirloom baby beets and greens maintained the true tastes and textures of his ingredients. As executive chef at Dakin House, the private dining mansion of Merck & Co. in Somerville, N.J., Kennedy values honesty in food.
NEWS
January 8, 1996 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carol Kaplan hoped against hope. All night, she stayed up and cooked and cooked some more, praying that somehow the snow wouldn't be so bad and the long-planned Torah Fund Brunch of the Germantown Jewish Centre could go on as planned. As the forecasts worsened and the white stuff actually began to fall, Kaplan shifted into high gear. Maybe the people bringing the kugels would be snowbound, she thought, so she cooked two extra kugels. Same for the cake people. So she baked a cake at 1 a.m. And just in case the brunch couldn't be held at all - well, Kaplan didn't want to be stuck with six salmon mousses.
FOOD
August 30, 1995 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
If you're in the market for a starter cookbook, you can't do better than Elaine Corn's "Now You're Cooking: Everything a Beginner Needs to Know to Start Cooking Today" (Harlow & Ratner, $24.95). The book has won every major award in its class this year, including a James Beard Award, a Julia Child Cookbook Award and "best general cookbook" from the International Association of Culinary Professionals. What makes this book ideal for the culinarily challenged is its ability to explain rock-bottom basics in clear, reassuring language.
NEWS
April 25, 1995 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Something nasty was burning. Ernestine Epps usually doesn't screw up when she's cooking, but last Thursday afternoon she forgot about the eggs boiling in the enamel pot perched on the apartment-sized range top. She had planned to make egg salad. She got egg crisps. But they were her egg crisps. Epps, an 18-year-old high school senior, has lived on her own for nearly a year. From the time she was 6 months old, she has lived with foster parents in about 10 different homes - from Germantown to West Philadelphia, from demoralizing to comforting, from violent to calm.
FOOD
September 4, 1994 | By Marie Simmons, FOR THE INQUIRER
Of all the standard American salads - tuna, potato, macaroni and egg - it is egg salad that I truly embrace. To make perfect egg salad, you need a perfectly cooked egg. To qualify, I think a cooked egg should have a dark yellow, soft yolk. The consistency of the yolk must be dense but buttery, with absolutely no gray shadow around the circumference. The white should be solid, of course, but tender, never rubbery. To meet these criteria, place the eggs carefully in a small, deep saucepan and cover with cold water.
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