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Eggplant

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NEWS
August 17, 2007
I was dismayed to read about the Boothwyn couple who claim the word "God" appeared to them on a slice of eggplant. An atheist, even I am insulted by this level of disrespect. If God really wants to appear miraculously, let's see him appear on my cell phone after I have used up all my minutes. If Verizon does not charge me an arm and a leg for the overtime call, that would be a miracle! Michael McGonigle Philadelphia
FOOD
May 23, 1990 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
My favorite eggplant dish is imam bayaldi, which literally translates to "the imam (Turkish priest) fainted. " Where did such a strange name come from? According to one tale, the spicy, fragrant dish was so delicious that the Imam passed out from pleasure. But another story has the Imam keeling over in despair when he found out that the cook used up all the household's precious olive oil to make it. I'd go with the latter version - I myself very nearly passed out when I saw the original recipe, calling for 2 cups of olive oil, nearly 4,000 calories.
NEWS
August 14, 2007 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Lord works in mysterious ways. Even through an eggplant, perhaps. Felicia Teske of Boothwyn was slicing on Sunday a pear-shaped purple veggie that she had purchased at a local produce stand when she noticed that the seeds formed a word. And the word was God. "It's definitely there," said her husband, Paul. Unlike similar claims, you don't have to strain your brain this time, he said. You may have heard, for example, about a Jesus in a Chihuahua's ear or a Virgin Mary in the grease stain of a pizza pan. "There's no imagination here," he said.
FOOD
May 11, 1988 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. This is no joke. Could you tell me how you determine the sex of an eggplant? It has something to do with the shape of the stem end. I understand the male is sometimes bitter and it's wise to get the female if possible. Cathy Smith Sinking Spring, Pa. A. There are male and female eggplants, and you might want to select a male not because it would be less bitter but because it might have fewer seeds. But don't look on the stem end; look at the opposite end, which contains a small scar.
FOOD
September 6, 1995 | by Aliza Green, Special to the Daily News
Eggplant can be the best of vegetables or the worst of vegetables. When it's good, it's very, very good, but when it's bad, it's horrid! I'm here to help you avoid leathery eggplant, soggy eggplant, bitter eggplant and grease- laden eggplant. Prepared properly, eggplant is creamy, with a melting texture and a meaty, satisfying, mouth-filling quality shared by few other vegetables. Eggplant's dramatic blue-black or ghostly white color and its striking shapes have suggested hidden magical and/or diabolical powers to some.
LIVING
February 23, 1986 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
If Willard Horner Sr. and Willard Jr. can produce successful crops of eggplant on 15 acres, it seems illogical that my gardening partner and I can't manage to keep even six plants in good shape through the summer. When we started gardening 15 years ago, it was a breeze. We had eggplant coming out of our ears. We fried it and froze it until we never wanted to see it again. During the last few summers, however, the plants have looked wonderful until about the beginning of July.
NEWS
January 20, 2000 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Calling him a "warrior for fitness," television legend Oprah Winfrey enlisted a new soldier in America's battle against the bulge: Philadelphia Mayor John F. Street. Street made a whirlwind trip to Chicago yesterday to tape a coming episode of the top-ranked Oprah Winfrey Show focusing on health and wellness. Pumped up and passionate about good living, Street talked about the city's weight problem and his plans to get Philadelphians in shape. He vowed to hire a "fitness czar" to lead the effort in City Hall.
FOOD
August 13, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
Eggplant can be the best of vegetables or, sometimes, the worst. When it's good, it's very, very good, but when it's bad, it's horrid! Good eggplant is creamy, with a melting texture and a meaty, satisfying, mouth-filling quality shared by few other vegetables. For many people, eggplant is "poor man's meat" or "poor man's caviar," proof of its versatility. Despite its long history associated with things devilish, it has been a staple in China, India, Japan, the Middle East, North Africa, Italy, Spain and Southern France.
FOOD
June 10, 1992 | By Andrew Schloss, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Cooked eggplant isn't a very flavorful vegetable. But this is actually one of the secrets of the eggplant's culinary allure, as its blandness makes it a perfect vehicle for all kinds of seasoning. Eggplant also has a natural creamy consistency that can thicken a sauce, moussaka or stew - without a speck of added cholesterol, less than half a gram of fat and barely an added calorie per serving. Though eggplant has been cultivated since antiquity, it has never gained much popularity in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011
LUKE PALLADINO Age: 42 Occupation: Owner/chef of Luke Palladino Seasonal Italian Cooking, in Northfield, N.J., and Luke Palladino, inside Harrah's Resort Atlantic City. Hometown: Bethpage, N.Y. Education: 1989 graduate of Culinary Institute of America. Professional: Has worked in and owned restaurants in New Orleans; Aspen, Colo.; Las Vegas; Atlantic City, and in Italy. Personal: Divorced; father of Kera, 20; Daniel, 17, and Elli, 9. Favorite ingredients: Marjoram, sage, corn, eggplant, pork.
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FOOD
May 16, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Ratatouille was on the menu for our after-school cooking class, and the fifth-grade cooks were eager to try the dish they knew about because of the eponymous Disney film - especially since the movie version of this vegetable stew was so good it melted the heart of the evil food critic, reminding him of his mother's home cooking. Indeed, ratatouille is a staple of French home cooking; it is served in school cafeterias and is a dish French children love. But they may not have loved it the first time they tried it, I told the Lawton elementary students.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
NINE-month-old Adler Ferrell was in the kitchen - a safe distance from the action, though - and watching intently as his mom, Jerrie Leone Ferrell, cooked dinner. Having a family audience is nothing new to Ferrell, who grew up in a large Italian family - two older brothers and a younger sister - in Jamison, Bucks County. Dinnertime brought everyone together, she recalled. "I remember a lot of pasta going on," Ferrell said. "There would also be a veal or chicken dish, and we always ended with fruit.
FOOD
November 1, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
When I arrived for our third cooking class at Bayard Taylor school in North Philadelphia, I learned two of my students were missing dance club to be there. I would understand the true extent of that sacrifice as class progressed. First, I handed out new aprons, a gift from the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. (Thanks, PHS.) As we read over this week's recipes, for turkey burgers and eggplant fries, the young chefs were looking quite professional! Four of the five kids had never tasted eggplant.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Turns out you're never too old to call your mother about a recipe. And regret it. We begin when I decide to cook a nice meal for Daughter Francesca, because we're about to start book tour. We eat french fries for dinner every book tour, and it's worth writing an entire book for an excuse to eat french fries. But if I eat french fries without being on a book tour, I start signing things. Occupational hazard. To stay on point, I decide to make eggplant parm, which I haven't made in years.
FOOD
February 23, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
An excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " Eggplant parmesan has always been one of my favorite foods on this Earth. There are not too many versions I don't love, paper-thin slices stacked high, rounds breaded and fried and baked in a casserole, even thick chunks of eggplant roasted and drizzled with sauce and cheese. My daughter inherited my love of eggplant, but really preferred the traditional version, breaded and layered with cheese and sauce. But since she has celiac disease, we had to come up with a gluten-free version.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2011
WHAT MAKES Vedge Vedge and not Horizons? Rich Landau explained the thinking behind three of Vedge's signature dishes: * Little leaves and herbs, rutabaga, smoked shiitake, pistachio, green onion. "The entry-level dish into the Vedge repertoire, but when you get into it, this is probably one of the more intricate things on the menu because of the way we put it together. "You won't just be eating a bunch of green. You're not going to taste chlorophyll. You're not going to be like, 'Wow, I'm grazing, look at me at the vegetable restaurant, grazing . . . wow, isn't this remarkable.' "The rutabaga, which is just one of my favorite vegetables in the world, we slice very thin and we roast it down in the oven with a touch of sherry vinegar, olive oil, fresh thyme, salt and pepper.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011
LUKE PALLADINO Age: 42 Occupation: Owner/chef of Luke Palladino Seasonal Italian Cooking, in Northfield, N.J., and Luke Palladino, inside Harrah's Resort Atlantic City. Hometown: Bethpage, N.Y. Education: 1989 graduate of Culinary Institute of America. Professional: Has worked in and owned restaurants in New Orleans; Aspen, Colo.; Las Vegas; Atlantic City, and in Italy. Personal: Divorced; father of Kera, 20; Daniel, 17, and Elli, 9. Favorite ingredients: Marjoram, sage, corn, eggplant, pork.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Of all the challenges a modern restaurant can tackle, refining simple dishes may be the hardest to master. Capturing that essence in a little clay crock - a few thin slivers of lightly battered eggplant, for example, artfully layered with fresh tomatoes, basil and mozzarella, then wood-roasted without turning to mush - is the rustic magic of places like Badolato. That's the walled Calabrian village beside the Ionian Sea where Toto Schiavone spent his childhood watching his mama make lunch with produce picked that morning from the family farm.
NEWS
March 21, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of the Flaim family have been growing eggplants in the sandy Cumberland County soil of their Vineland farm for 76 years, nurturing tiny seedlings into five-foot-tall plants that bear more than 20 fruits each. Most will be sold as usual to wholesale buyers or at farmers' markets. This year, 15 percent will find their way into freezer cases in specialty stores and cafeterias throughout the region. For the last two seasons, the Flaims have been processing the eggplant as breaded cutlets in boxes with the state's Jersey Fresh label, which tells customers they are eating local and is generally reserved for fresh produce.
FOOD
December 31, 2009
One hot Italian At a hole in the wall called Pasto just east of City Hall you will find arguably the best Italian roasted vegetable sandwich in the city. It is called the Capriciosa. The owner Paola Chiavatti, a child of Abruzzi, bakes the rolls herself - miraculously airy, crisp-crusted ciabatta. She slices boiled russett potatoes and warms them in olive oil with sauteed onion. On goes toothsome broccoli rabe. And thin slices of eggplant, delicately egg-battered and fried. Then roasted peppers.
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