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Ego

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NEWS
March 21, 2005 | By MARCIANNE WATERS
SATURDAY, 8 a.m. My head throbbed. "What did you do last night? What did you do last night? What did you do last night?," chanted the hamsters running on the wheel in my brain. You guessed it. A hangover. But this wasn't your average too-many-Chardonnays-at-the-Joneses hangover. This was an ego hangover. Ego hangover? You know, that yucky feeling that comes after you get blind drunk on the sound of your own voice. Well, maybe you don't know. So let me tell you how I came to be in this pickle.
NEWS
February 24, 1986
In statements following his dismissal from the Statue of Liberty restoration commission, Lee Iacocca showed himself to be possessed of an ego without bounds. He obviously believes that schoolchildren who send their nickels to restore Miss Liberty did so because of his involvement. The love expressed for the statue by millions of Americans who contributed to this grand effort should not be sullied by the involvement of carnival barkers and pitch men. Lee Iacocca is expendable - the love is not. Stanley M. Najdzin Bensalem.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
Mary Tyler Moore and Lynn Redgrave in "Sweet Sue," a new play by A. R. Gurney Jr. Directed by John Tillinger, set by Santo Loquasto, costumes by Jess Goldstein, lighting by Ken Billington. Presented by Arthur Whitelaw, Dick Button and Byron Goldman at the Music Box Theater, 239 W. 45th St., New York. Forty years ago, the subject matter of "Sweet Sue" would have been scandalous. Today, who cares? The shock value of an older woman lusting after a post-pubescent youth - in the case at hand, her son's college roommate - was blunted for all time by "The Graduate" and buried subsequently in the tomb of The Old Morality.
SPORTS
April 14, 1986 | By JOE GREENDAY, Daily News Sports Writer
Greg Norman's ego got the best of him, and it might have cost him the Masters championship. The Australian, known as the "Great White Shark," got hungry at a crucial point yesterday and opened the way for Jack Nicklaus. Norman was the leader when the day began, stumbled midway through, but came on strong in the pressure-packed finish with four straight birdies to grab a share of the lead. All he needed on the final hole was a par to face Nicklaus in a sudden-death playoff.
SPORTS
January 25, 2009 | By Kate Fagan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Luckily for 76ers power forward Elton Brand, he said he doesn't have an ego. He said he did in his younger playing days - he's 29 now - but no longer. If he did have an ego, it might have been tough watching the team he was supposed to anchor soar through the roof without him. Today, Brand says he is about winning. And, lately, Brand has watched a lot of winning: While he sat for 16 games with a dislocated right shoulder, the Sixers, after a 1-4 West Coast swing, went on a seven-game winning streak and finished 9-7. Brand, who signed in July for $80 million over five years, hasn't played in a game since Dec. 17. Before his injury, the Sixers were 11-14; Brand was averaging 15.9 points and 9.8 rebounds a game.
SPORTS
March 24, 2000 | By Todd Zolecki, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The constant pats on the back, the endless attention, the pile of awards - Cherrise Graham could live a happy life without them. Really. Which makes Archbishop Carroll's Graham, The Inquirer's Main Line and Delaware County girls' basketball player of the year, somewhat of an athletic rarity. She is the star athlete without the attitude; the athlete with the type of personality that makes friends, coaches and acquaintances gush over her. "That's the last thing [a big ego]
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | BY JERRY CARRIER
More years ago than I like to admit, I worked on Capitol Hill, thus gaining the opportunity for a close look at the U.S. House of Representatives. It was a fascinating study in diversity. There were huge people like Tip O'Neill and Rogers Morton and petite people like Carl Albert and Shirley Chisholm. There were theatrical people like Dan Flood and Roger Zion and shy people like Bill Barrett and Bob Nix. There were patricians like Peter Frelinghuysen, blue-collar guys like Earl Landgrebe and country boys like Carl Perkins.
NEWS
April 6, 2006
THE WORLD is full of people whose egos are bigger than their accomplishments, but we don't know of a city with a higher per capital number of puffed-up chests than Washington, D.C. - especially at 545 Seventh Street SE, otherwise known as the U.S. Capitol. Yet, what inflates must also deflate, and this week we're witnessing the air going out of two of the biggest gas-bags in Washington. First, on the Republican side, is the retreat and surrender of former House Majority Leader Tom "The Hammer" DeLay.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | By Michael Kimmelman, Inquirer Music Critic
"What we need now is someone who will really discipline us, someone to show us who's boss. " This remark was made a few days ago by a member of a West Coast orchestra in a conversation about the merits of the group's new music director. It's not the kind of statement that many orchestra players would admit making, nor the sort of thought that many listeners might expect musicians to have. The concert stage isn't generally regarded as an arena for power struggles. Musicians look like a fairly genial lot, after all, especially when they're performing.
NEWS
June 26, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Bruce Willis shoots into the hotel suite like a blue-eyed bullet, head shaved, T white, jeans pale as his orbs. The wiry actor is trim, more like a spokesmodel for the imaginary health supplement Diet Hard than an aging action hero flogging a movie franchise last seen during Clinton's first term. After an absence of 12 years, Willis' alter ego John McClane returns to theaters Wednesday in Live Free or Die Hard - or Die Hard 4.0 , as it's called in Europe. Willis, 52, reprises the role of the battle-scarred NYPD detective who shoots from the hip and the lip, this time taking aim at cyberterrorists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2016 | By Nick Cristiano, Staff Writer
Are you ready for this country? "My goal was to make the best country album of the year and make it completely unplayable. So I achieved my goal," Wheeler Walker Jr. says. "It's a pretty dumb goal. " Speaking from a van headed to New Orleans from Dallas, the singer, who plays the Foundry at the Fillmore Saturday, is discussing his deeply country - and outrageously filthy - debut album, Redneck S - . The album gets no radio play. You can't buy it at Walmart, and you won't see Walker on TV - nearly all the song titles are unprintable here.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Kanye "The Ego" West lets loose "What [is] the point of thinking?" So declared Kanye West Thursday on Ellen DeGeneres ' show when the host suggested he may want to reflect on his tweets before posting them. Kim Kardashian 's hub is famous for detonating stream-of-consciousness ravings on social media. West, 38, accused the media of trying to make him look foolish. Despite it all, he insisted, "I care about people. " Before Ellen could stop him (but would she want to?
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
If any company loves a good theme, it's EgoPo Classic Theater . Since its start, artistic director Lane Savadove has built seasons around Jewish theater classics, expressionism, cruelty, and Henrik Ibsen. The 2015-16 season focuses on provocative stagings of plays by female American masters. First came Lillian Hellman's The Children's Hour , then Clare Booth Luce's The Women . Now comes Sophie Treadwell's 1928 expressionist play, Machinal, which opens Friday at the Latvian Society with Philly favorite Mary Tuomanen in the lead.
NEWS
March 25, 2016
ARIES (March 21-April 19). It's good to have observers, which you need right now. Invite onlookers. Ask for critique. Someone who studies your moves will be able to tell you things about how you operate that you didn't know. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Expect conversational oddities, quirks in clothing, and hiccups that have to do with getting from here to there. Yet, you will float through thes day soaking up and spreading emotional sunshine. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). When the task at hand is something you don't want to do, it's not your fault.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2016 | By Bill Chenevert, For The Inquirer
EgoPo Classic Theater, celebrating female playwrights this season, offers The Women , a 1936 play by Clare Boothe Luce. The work is staggering, a 19-actress production with nary a man in sight. EgoPo was quite smart to choose this rich and complex play. The production, at the Latvian Society through March 20, both modernizes the play's themes and maintains some accents of the period that Luce so boldly defied. Act 1 is book-ended by two vivid scenes: the opening, in which a woman on what appears to be a massive white bed wakes, terrified, to blood stains at her groin; and the close, in which the protagonist's daughter screams at the news that her mother and father are divorcing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
When EgoPo Classic Theater was putting together last year's American Giants Festival, a season comprising three iconic playwrights, artistic director Lane Savadove was acutely aware that something was missing. "We were very conscious of it being a very male, very white season," he said. "I wanted a counterpart. " Thus, American Giants II: The Women, which opened with Lillian Hellman's classic The Children's Hour , running through Sunday. Adrienne Mackey, 33, one of the region's most inventive young theater artists and founder of Swim Pony Performing Arts, is guest director.
NEWS
October 1, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marcie Lichtman says her 14-year-old daughter had always scored in the "advanced" range on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) tests, administered to third through eighth graders. But when last year's scores in English/Language Arts and math arrived in the mail last week, the now-ninth grader was surprised to see she scored only "proficient. " "I needed to administer a little first aid to her self-esteem by showing her an article and video explaining what is going on," said Lichtman, who lives in the Fairmount section of Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Grab your wigs and fake boobs, guys: The glitter is in the audience for Divine/Intervention . The onstage show, which just opened at a nightclub called Voyeur (dark, dark, dark, with gigantic lavender-lit chandeliers), is actually a serious and often moving bio-drama about the counterculture icon known as Divine. Divine's real name was Glenn Milstead, a fat, unhappy kid from a middle-class home in Baltimore. How he wound up starring in John Waters' schlock/shock movies - where he was raped by a giant lobster in Multiple Maniacs , and ate a dog turd in Pink Flamingos , and made it mainstream big in Hairspray - is incidental here.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Two boards and a passion. That, according to the old saying, is all you need to make theater, and EgoPo Classic Theater proves this - literally - in its stunning production of The Hairy Ape . Matteo Scammell, a human force field, provides much of that passion, in a very impressive, very visceral, very muscular performance as Yank, the central character in this early (1922) expressionist play by Eugene O'Neill. And this production, directed with great imagination by Brenna Geffers, offers a master class is expressionism on stage - a highly stylized kind of theater in which the character's feelings are made visible and audible, feelings that in Yank's case range from arrogance to rage to desperation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2015 | the Inquirer Staff
Schilling vs. the Trolls Former Phillies pitcher Curt Schilling , furious, took up arms against two men he said were marauding his daughter Gabby via Twitter. On Feb. 25, he'd congratulated Gabby for getting to pitch for the Salve Regina University Seahawks softball team in Newport, R.I. The social-media reaction, mostly happy, included some gross and indecent messages. Schilling outed the messagers as one Adam Nagel of Brookdale Community College in Lincroft, N.J., and another man later identified as Sean MacDonald.
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