IN THE NEWS

Ego

SPORTS
August 13, 2005 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 18th-century English poet Edward Young probably didn't have Penn State coach Joe Paterno in mind when he wrote, "All men think all men mortal but themselves. " You have to wonder, though. "I've been up since 4:30 this morning," Paterno said while taking occasional sips from a cup of coffee during a recent interview in Chicago. "I still get by on five hours sleep. I walked six miles yesterday and the day before, up and down hills, 85 degrees, you know. I don't feel like an old man, but you guys [in the media]
NEWS
August 18, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the news-cycle version of showing up fashionably late, a week after every L.A. County resident who has a PR rep denied Us Weekly's report that she said "yes!" to some ham-handed, bended-knee rap by Vince Vaughn, Jen Aniston tells People in an exclusive interview(!), "I'm not engaged, and I don't have a ring, and I haven't been proposed. " The Break-Up star said she's been forced to dignify "these things" now that even that bastion of news sobriety (and Anderson Cooper-ism), CNN, is parroting the rumors.
SPORTS
January 20, 1994 | by Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
Five years ago, Jerry Jones and Jimmy Johnson came into the NFL together, looking like the perfect couple. A good ol' boy from Arkansas (Jones) and a good ol' boy from Texas (Johnson). College teammates at the University of Arkansas. Longtime pals. Jones bought the Cowboys and handed his buddy a 10-year, fill-in-the-blank contract to coach them. Together. Forever. But for a number of reasons, most of which have to do with ego and money, this perfect marriage of owner and coach has experienced quite a bit of well- publicized strain over the last couple of years.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By GORDON A. HAALAND
At the end of World War II, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower was invited by the grateful British to speak at London's historic Guildhall. To an audience that included King George VI and Prime Minister Winston Churchill, Eisenhower stated, "No man alone could have brought about (Germany's defeat). Had I possessed the military skill of a Marlborough, the wisdom of Solomon, the understanding of Lincoln, I still would have been helpless without the loyalty, vision and generosity of thousands upon thousands of British and Americans.
SPORTS
December 6, 1996 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Alonzo Lewis woke up late and walked his dog and watched television and took trips into Center City just to pass the time. Lewis still coached basketball at Chester High during the 1994-95 season, but that took only a few hours out of his day. He had retired from teaching two years earlier and was smelling the roses for the first time in his adult life. Then he got the call. Would he coach basketball at Cheyney University? "Most people I talked to said don't take it," Lewis said.
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nancy Glass is a gas. The popular local television and radio personality, who hosted the KYW-TV (Channel 3) Evening Magazine from 1983 to '89 and the WYXR-FM (104.5) morning radio show from 1998 to '99, now works mostly behind the camera. Glass, who also made a name for herself on the nationally syndicated Inside Edition (1990-93) and American Journal (1993-97), co-owns a company that produces programs for such cable channels as Discovery Daytime, Animal Planet, and Home & Garden Television.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2008 | By ED WEINER, weinere@phillynews.com
HOLLYWOOD'S a place where the overconfident survive. If you're simply confident, that'll be you parking my car. And maybe even overconfidence doesn't quite cut it anymore - super-hyper-ultra-confidence is what's required just to get work, let alone fame. But in a town where a whole lot of people are full of themselves, Miley Cyrus 's ego-gauge needle seems to be firmly stuck on F. Granted, it wouldn't be normal if she didn't get a bit of a swelled head, what with all the attention and money that "Hannah Montana" has brought to her at such a young age. But, based on some comments she has made to TV Guide , this girl needs a whiplash collar just to keep her oversized head supported.
SPORTS
November 7, 1997 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Popular theory: Evander Holyfield has Mike Tyson's number. Holyfield beat Tyson twice, would have beaten him had their fight in 1991 gone off as scheduled, will beat him a third time if and when Tyson's boxing license is reinstated. Not-so-popular theory: Michael Moorer has Holyfield's number. His southpaw style flummoxed Holyfield in their 1994 title bout, which Moorer won on a majority decision, and it likely will flummox him again in tomorrow night's unification rematch in the Thomas & Mack Center.
LIVING
November 2, 1995 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The revised hardline according to Terence Trent D'Arby: "I'm starting to see the world less as I am, and more as the world is. " Whoa. Is this the same incredibly self-obsessed singer-songwriter who was going to restore soul to black music? The brash young hope who compared his debut, Introducing the Hardline According to Terence Trent D'Arby, favorably to the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper? Hyped as the next Prince, D'Arby appeared like a comet in 1987, brandishing rock-guitar power and a charming, vulnerable, sweet-soul voice.
LIVING
November 30, 1992 | By Art Carey, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even his fiercest enemies, even the most hard-hearted critics of his policies, had to feel some small measure of sympathy as he stood before his friends and supporters on election night and made the most difficult speech of his life. "The people have spoken," George Bush announced, the pain contorting his forced smile. After three decades of government service, after four years as the nation's CEO, the voters of America had, in effect, fired him. For Bush, it was the worst moment of a bad week of a bad month of a bad year.
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