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Eiffel Tower

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NEWS
January 17, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most of us, it's a little early to be thinking spring. Not Richard Cousins. He's a welder, and last week, in a scenery-building shop in Sharon Hill, he began assembling pieces of steel latticework to create an Eiffel Tower for the 2011 Philadelphia International Flower Show, which runs from March 6 to 13 at the Convention Center. "Springtime in Paris" is the theme of the show, a Philadelphia tradition since 1829. For thousands of visitors and generations of families, it's an annual ritual that foreshadows warmer weather and lifts the collective mood.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1998 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Bloomberg News contributed to this article
An American company running the Eiffel Tower? Sacre bleu! In 1989, xenophobic Americans were outraged when Japan's Mitsubishi conglomerate bought Rockefeller Center in New York. Now, chauvinistic Parisians are choking on their baguettes over the prospect that GMAC Commercial Mortgage, of Horsham, could end up running their landmark tower. GMAC and the Bass family of Texas have made a joint bid to purchase 70 percent of troubled lender Credit Foncier de France SA from the French government.
LIVING
January 6, 2000 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The designers wanted it to be about joy. They wanted it to be about flight. And, being French, they naturally also wanted it to be about sex. On all those counts, the New Year's Eve fireworks display at the Eiffel Tower delivered spectacularly, and then some. Nearly a week later, the world is still buzzing about it. No one has taken an official vote, but it's generally conceded that in the critical areas of beauty and style, those darned French have claimed the prize again. The concept was brilliantly simple: Take Paris' most important symbol, the 984-foot Eiffel Tower, light it up with 20,000 lightbulbs, and shoot fountains of fireworks from bottom to top. Instead of using tons of relentless boom-bam (like London and Sydney and Philadelphia, to name a few)
NEWS
June 20, 1994 | By Dale Mezzacappa, with reports from Inquirer wire services
FROM MORTARBOARD TO TUBE, ALL BEFORE PUBERTY First, a college degree at 10. Then, before you can spell precocious, a television contract. Whiz kid Michael Kearney, who is recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's youngest college graduate, sure doesn't like to sit around with nothing to do. Two weeks after getting his bachelor's degree in anthropology from the University of South Alabama, he landed a contract to be...
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | By Doug Lansky, FOR THE INQUIRER
Anyone who's ever been sightseeing knows that these days it's no longer good enough to just see the sight. You have to capture the image, take it home with you, get it developed, then try to figure out what your little finger is doing on top of the Eiffel Tower. For the last decade or so, tourists and their cameras have been as inseparable as yuppies and their humidors, whether they spring for a $10,000 set-up with a lens the size of Arizona or a $15 disposable number with an attached rubber band so they can wear the thing fashionably on their wrist.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Henri Sault, Inquirer Coins Writer
The French observance of the momentous events that led to that country's revolution in 1789 has launched a series of coins that began to appear in 1984 and will be completed this year. The series has gone beyond the revolutionary period to include other historic events. The penultimate coin in the series celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Eiffel Tower. The visual symbol of Paris, the Eiffel Tower was opened on March 31, 1889. On the anniversary date, the Monnaie de Paris unveiled its 5- franc silver and 5-franc gold commemorative coins in ceremonies at the French consulate in New York City.
NEWS
April 24, 2005 | By Patricia Conroy FOR THE INQUIRER
Celebrations were erupting all around us. My friends and I had been on a riverboat in the south of France, and we were surprised and delighted when we realized we would be arriving in Paris on July 14, Bastille Day. As soon as we arrived at the hotel, not wanting to squander such an opportunity, we nearly assaulted the concierge, and quickly agreed our best bet would be a dinner cruise on the Seine culminating in fireworks at the Eiffel Tower....
NEWS
January 8, 2007
RE RIVER City: Once again, certain pseudo-intellectuals and their political mouthpieces hang out the sign "Visionary Developers and Those Who Would Create Thousands of Jobs Stay Away from Philadelphia!" If it weren't so insane, it'd be laughable. Critics call River City "Hong Kong on the Schuylkill," but are they aware that Hong Kong is one of the world's most beautiful cities? As for those who say it would block out the sun,I guess DaVinci was wrong, and the earth and sun are stationary.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one had ever seen the likes of it before. There were beautiful domed buildings, gleaming sculptures and massive fountains. Huge, brightly colored steam engines chugged away in exhibit halls while the newly invented phonograph played the latest music. Perhaps the greatest wonders of all were the electric street lamps lighting up the night and the illuminated tower of iron trusses and beams standing above the grounds like a giant, nearly 1,000 feet high. Here was the Paris World's Fair of 1889 - best known for its symbol, the Eiffel Tower - but also known as the place where America's artists first gained an international reputation in the art world.
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NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, CULTURE WRITER
At an April 8 grand opening, a ball of fire will rise from Penn's Landing. A massive South Broad Street fair will follow on April 23, featuring art, music, performance, and a trick or two. Bookended by these attractions, the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts will return to the city for its third run, a bit smaller this go-round, more concentrated, but with dozens of events and a decidedly international flavor. The Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, organizer of the festival, will release details of many events Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2015 | Solomon Jones
I can still remember the day my daughter, Eve, promised to take me to Paris. I was sitting at the kitchen counter, and she was telling me of her dreams. It's something she's always done because, from the time she could talk, Eve has been a dreamer, and I have been her kindred spirit. Eve's dreams are painstakingly specific: a pink Infiniti convertible; male and female shih tzus; shopping sprees funded by her job as a lawyer; a corner office with a view. However, this dream of Paris is different from the rest.
TRAVEL
November 25, 2013 | By Robin B. Smith, For The Inquirer
No place can outshine Paris at Christmas. With its illuminated monuments, buildings, and bridges, the City of Light lives up to its billing all year. During December, however, its visual splendors exceed all superlatives. The kaleidoscope of shifting views down grand avenues and boulevards dazzles and astonishes. Darkness comes early, but there is an enchanted hour just after sunset, when the hastening dusk triggers the streetlights and rich color fills the sky. The French call it l'heure bleue , the blue hour, "when the sky has lost its sun but has not yet found its stars.
SPORTS
June 24, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
OK, SO MATT Kozemchak was experiencing at least a partial version of Down-in-the-Dumps Syndrome by early Saturday afternoon. For a very cool reason, however, he didn't even edge close to full-blown. Though it would have been great to stride to the plate at Citizens Bank Park and, who knows, maybe lace one into the gap, it's not as if the rest of Kozemchak's baseball summer will be unappealing. For reasons no one has yet explained to him, the 5-11, 180-pound Kozemchak, a recent graduate of Springside Chestnut Hill Academy, has been chosen to play for a squad that soon will make a mighty-far journey.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Want to know everything there is to know about the resident teenager? Walk into her room. "Three minutes of observation in my bedroom will tell you more about me than three hours of conversation," Valerie Lenzi, 18, a senior at Owen J. Roberts High School, wrote in her Common App college essay. "Walk through the heavy, metal kitchen door, up the mauve-carpeted staircase . . . and stop directly in front of the last door on the left. You have reached my tangible soul: my bedroom. " Covered in posters and art prints, Lenzi's room showcases her musical tastes (The Kooks, Jonas Brothers - a nod to her younger days, she allows)
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | Choose one .
    By Christopher Lawler   FOR THE INQUIRER   When I announced to friends that I had booked a trip to Paris last summer, many responded with those old Francophobe prejudices: "Parisians are rude" or "The French don't like Americans. " I honestly don't get it. I never encountered a single impolite Parisian in the nine days I spent there. On the contrary, the locals were delightful and went out of their way to accommodate a couple of English-speaking tourists who made respectful (if laughable)
NEWS
December 23, 2011
AS OLD MAN WINTER arrives, he brings two kinds of "annual letters" tucked inside Christmas (or, to be P.C., holiday) cards. The first kind is filled with bad news. The second is good news, which can be worse if it fills you with envy. The bad-news letter reveals someone is suffering with a disease, or lost a loved one, a job, a pet, or is living in the shade of betrayal by a loved one. That evokes pity, but maybe also relief that the evil tide has engulfed someone other than you. In the season of joy, the bad-news letter chills you like a penguin's backside.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2011
Happy birthday, Lucille Ball: Looking good at 100 From Carrie Rickey's "Flickgrrl" http://www.philly.com/flickgrrl Lucille Ball, the long-stemmed looker born Aug. 6, 1911, came to Hollywood when she was 22. For two decades, mostly at RKO Pictures, she was cast as dime-a-dance dames, b-girls, and burlesque queens, ever the wisecracker, never the star. But she had the last laugh. In the early 1950s, the studios lived in dread of television, refusing to sell their old films for broadcast or permit their stars to appear on the small screen.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cancan music and French torch songs didn't quite drown out the chants of protest at the Philadelphia International Flower Show on Wednesday. Nine protesters from a group calling itself the Earth Quaker Action Team held hands and formed a human chain in front of the PNC Bank exhibit to protest what they called the bank's "environmental crimes" in Appalachia. The group contends that PNC invests in mountain removal, a method of coal extraction that has "destroyed over 500 mountains and buried 1,200 miles of rivers in toxic waste.
NEWS
January 17, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most of us, it's a little early to be thinking spring. Not Richard Cousins. He's a welder, and last week, in a scenery-building shop in Sharon Hill, he began assembling pieces of steel latticework to create an Eiffel Tower for the 2011 Philadelphia International Flower Show, which runs from March 6 to 13 at the Convention Center. "Springtime in Paris" is the theme of the show, a Philadelphia tradition since 1829. For thousands of visitors and generations of families, it's an annual ritual that foreshadows warmer weather and lifts the collective mood.
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