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Einhorn

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NEWS
July 27, 2001 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Ira Einhorn vanished in January 1981, just before his murder trial, one man in Philadelphia dogged his trail for 20 years. Richard DiBenedetto was a 32-year-old investigator for the District Attorney's Office when the hunt started. Today, with Einhorn finally in a Pennsylvania prison, he is a 52-year-old retiree who got his man at last. DiBenedetto savored that victory by reopening a carefully saved bottle of Bordeaux. He first uncorked the French wine in 1997, to celebrate Einhorn's capture in France.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By Dorothy G. Wegard, Special to The Inquirer
When Carol Einhorn takes center stage at Resorts International next week to do her rendition of Singing in the Rain, five busloads of her friends from Leisuretowne, a retirement community in Vincentown, will be rooting for her. Einhorn, 64, the mother of three and grandmother of seven, will represent New Jersey at the Ms. Senior America Pageant set for April 20 at Resorts, in Atlantic City. A perky, trim redhead, Einhorn hails from Ardsley, N.Y., and has lived at Leisuretowne for almost three years.
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | by Theresa Conroy , Daily News Staff Writer
Mary Maddux used to play outfield. That and a little anger went a long way last night during the Daily News-WPHT (1210-AM) Ira Einhorn Killer Tomato Toss. The Massachusetts resident, sister of Einhorn murder victim Holly Maddux, managed to hit the most impressive shot during the tomato throw: Nailed Einhorn right in the forehead, dead center. The target was a billboard mug shot of Einhorn, the man convicted in absentia in 1993 of bludgeoning Holly Maddux to death, then sticking her corpse in his closet to rot. Throwing tomatoes at the billboard was supposed to be the consolation prize for contestants whose homegrown fruit failed to woo the judges with their ripeness, heft, color and shape.
NEWS
February 19, 1999 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Ira Einhorn listened in apparent disbelief, a three-judge French court ruled here yesterday that he may be extradited to the United States to face a new trial for the 1977 murder of Helen "Holly" Maddux. The decision marked an abrupt change of fortune for Einhorn, 58, the former counterculture guru who has been pursued by U.S. and Philadelphia authorities for nearly two decades ever since he fled to Europe as his murder trial was pending. The same French court had ruled in December 1997 that Einhorn, who was convicted in absentia in 1993, could not be extradited because Philadelphia could not promise him a new trial if he was returned to the United States.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Peter Slevin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Moving Ira Einhorn from his French prison cell to one in Pennsylvania could prove difficult, costly, frustrating - and slow. The main problem, say experts in international law, is that Einhorn, a fugitive from the law since 1981, was convicted in absentia in Philadelphia and sentenced to life in prison - and has no rights of appeal left under U.S. law. France and other European countries grant people who have been convicted in absentia the...
NEWS
January 11, 2002 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ira Einhorn's second murder trial begins in the fall, prosecutors plan to present new testimony against the former fugitive, accused of killing his girlfriend in 1977 and stuffing her body in a trunk. "There are new witnesses that have come forward," Assistant District Attorney Joel Rosen told Common Pleas Court Judge William J. Mazzola yesterday. Rosen later declined to elaborate. Mazzola scheduled the case to begin Sept. 30. Jury selection and the trial are expected to last three or four weeks.
NEWS
November 21, 1997 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Daniel Rubin contributed to this article
With Ira Einhorn beaming at them from the side benches, Einhorn's French attorneys argued yesterday that he could not be extradited to the United States because America's "inhumane," "regressive" and "Stone Age" judicial system could not guarantee him fair treatment. The attorneys said Philadelphia assistant district attorney Joel Rosen, who won a murder conviction against Einhorn in a 1993 trial in absentia, was as trustworthy as "a used car salesman. " And if the French courts agree to allow Einhorn to be sent back to the United States, they said, it will be a victory for American "imperialism," showing that "a little court in a small country shouldn't give lessons in human rights to the new master of the world order.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | by Theresa Conroy and Hubert Barat, For the Daily News
Ira Einhorn's French courtroom battle is over. He lost. A French appeals court yesterday agreed that the hippie fugitive should be shipped back to Philadelphia. But don't set up that airport welcome committee yet. The two-year odyssey to reclaim Philadelphia's most famous fugitive isn't over. Einhorn's extradition to face murder charges here for the 1977 bludgeoning of his girlfriend, Holly Maddux, will now enter an administrative realm in French government. Before Einhorn can come back, French Prime Minister Lionel Jospin must sign the extradition order.
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Now Ira Einhorn wants to talk. After years of running, hiding and refusing interviews, the fugitive guru is shopping his story to about 300 reporters. In a three-page e-mail distributed this week, Einhorn - writing from his quaint cottage in the South of France - invited an "honest journalist" to document "his side of the story" of the 1977 murder of his girlfriend, Holly Maddux. It was unclear yesterday whether Einhorn's urgent attempt to find a friendly reporter was inspired by hurt feelings or fear.
NEWS
September 3, 1997 | by Hubert Barat and Theresa Conroy, For the Daily News
Annika Flodin is standing by her man. Ira Einhorn's Swedish wife said she believes the convicted murderer was framed. "We've lived together for nearly 10 years," she said in an interview in French last weekend. "I knew from the beginning what they accuse him of and I know that it is false. He never killed his first woman. He is the opposite of a violent man. He's a pacifist. " She believes Einhorn was set up for the murder of Helen "Holly" Maddux, because of his ideas, his network of friends that extended all the way to the Soviet Union, his anti-nuclear meetings and his work with the paranormal and telepathic.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
Philadelphians know better than anyone why Dominique Strauss-Kahn should remain anchored to New York City. Two words: Ira Einhorn. Einhorn, the slovenly, self-appointed hippie guru of 1960s and '70s counterculture with a history of abusing women, was convicted in 2002 of murdering his former girlfriend Holly Maddux, a Texas-born cheerleading beauty. The road to that elusive conviction, however, took 25 arduous years - and finally happened with little help from Strauss-Kahn's enlightened countrymen.
NEWS
October 22, 2010
IN HER COLUMN "Hard Cell: Einhorn Speaks," Ronnie Polaneczky mentioned that Ira Einhorn had been "tried and convicted in absentia," and then, after being extradited back to Philadelphia in 2001, "was convicted in 2002. " So it seems Einhorn was tried twice for the same crime, which constitutes double jeopardy, a violation of the Constitution! Rob Boyden Drexel Hill
NEWS
October 19, 2010
HOW UTTERLY appropriate that Ira Einhorn feels irrelevant. Columnist Ronnie Polaneczky strikes right at the heart of his character with her words "narcissistic gasbag. " I was there on Earth Day 1970 when Ira took over the microphone. He was booed off in short order. I also attended his trial testimony. For two days, the courtroom sat appalled as Ira dropped names, spun yarns and tossed around literary references, more like a man applying for membership at an exclusive club than one on trial for the rest of his life.
NEWS
October 14, 2010
Several months ago, Ira Einhorn initiated correspondence with Daily News columnist Ronnie Polaneczky. This is an edited version of his recent take on the judicial system. SINCE MY ABRUPT return to the Pennsylvania Prison System in 2001, I have had numerous conversations with shocked former citizens who have repeated the same words to me, in different form, again and again: "I never dreamed that people caught up in the judicial system could be treated so unfairly, with such lack of concern for their rights.
NEWS
October 14, 2010 | By Ronnie, Daily News Columnist
IRA EINHORN still has the white hair and goatee he sported in 2002, when he was convicted of killing his girlfriend, Holly Maddux, whose mummified remains were found in a trunk in Einhorn's Powelton Village apartment in 1979. And those blue eyes haven't lost their freaky intensity as he approaches the eighth anniversary, this Sunday, of his conviction. But, at 70, Einhorn is thinner than the husky bear we knew back then. His hairline has receded, revealing a scalp that looks like marbled ham, and he has lost some front teeth.
NEWS
November 16, 2006 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ira Einhorn - the Philadelphia counterculture guru who turned international fugitive after his girlfriend's mummified body was found in his Powelton Village apartment in 1979 - does not deserve a new trial, Pennsylvania's Superior Court has ruled. In an opinion filed Tuesday, a three-judge Superior Court panel unanimously rejected all 10 of Einhorn's legal challenges to his 2002 conviction and life sentence for the murder of Helen "Holly" Maddux, 27. The court ruled that, even if the Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge made trial errors, they did not prejudice the jury against Einhorn's defense.
NEWS
November 30, 2004 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TV CRITIC
Cable TV's gaping maw demands programming, and it can turn the most respectable intentions into sleaze city. Tonight's case in point: Interpol Investigates at 10 p.m. and its luridly uninformative rehash of the famous case of Ira Einhorn, which cheapens the often distinguished National Geographic Channel. "When crimes are committed," breathless narrator Michael Shapiro gushes, "an international organization unites police officers to deliver justice. " You know the show's dying to follow that rip-off of the Law & Order prologue with the distinctive musical dunh-dunt, but that would unite an international organization of copyright lawyers to deliver subpoenas.
NEWS
January 9, 2004 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The unflappable and methodical prosecutor who twice convicted Ira Einhorn of murder and put the hippie fugitive away for life has left the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office for private practice. Joel Rosen, who worked in the office for 22 years and once headed the elite Major Trials Unit, began work this week as a personal injury lawyer for the Center City firm Kessler Cohen & Roth. The firm handles plaintiffs' litigation in product liability and medical malpractice. "It's a group of great lawyers - very bright attorneys - and they have great cases," Rosen said yesterday.
NEWS
August 28, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal jury decided yesterday that defense attorney William T. Cannon did not slander a prosecution witness in remarks to reporters at last year's murder trial of former hippie guru Ira Einhorn. The seven-member civil jury (one juror was excused) deliberated about 2 1/2 hours Tuesday and yesterday before returning its verdict in the lawsuit against Cannon by Genie O'Brien, of Sarasota, Fla. O'Brien and her attorney, Elliot B. Platt, declined to comment afterward, as did Cannon.
NEWS
May 4, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Unicorn speaks. Again. For the first time since his Oct. 17 murder conviction in the 1977 bludgeoning of girlfriend Helen "Holly" Maddux, former counterculture guru Ira Einhorn has discussed aspects of the case that has put him behind bars for life. But Maddux's murder was not one of them. Einhorn denies any role in the murder or the placement of her desiccated corpse in a steamer trunk in a locked closet. His appeal is pending in Pennsylvania Superior Court. Instead, Einhorn spoke Tuesday, on the record, in a 30-minute phone call from the state prison at Houtzdale in connection with today's Inquirer Magazine story about Joyce Costello, who testified against him at his first murder trial in 1993.
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