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Election Boycott

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NEWS
October 11, 2004 | By Malcolm Garcia INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A boycott of Afghanistan's surprisingly peaceful first presidential election began to unravel yesterday, when one of the 15 candidates challenging incumbent Hamid Karzai denied he was part of the protest. "Their position was different than mine," said Haji Mohammad Mohaqiq. "My position is to make a complaint within the system. There should be a complete investigation. " Afghan officials yesterday said there would be such an investigation. "There is going to be an independent commission made to investigate it," said electoral director Farooq Wardak.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | Daily News wire services
DURBAN CHIEF AGAIN CALLS FOR ZULU LAND In South Africa, Mangosuthu Buthelezi made a fresh call yesterday for a sovereign Zulu kingdom, saying he would only end his election boycott if the demand was met. The Zulu leader's statement appeared to be political brinksmanship in a bid to win concessions from the rival ANC as the deadline approached for parties to register for the nation's first all-race election in April. The African National Congress, South Africa's largest political group, is expected to win the election.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Jamal Halaby and Dale Gavlak, Associated Press
AMMAN, Jordan - The surprise victory of 37 Islamist and other government critics despite an election boycott injects a degree of dissent into Jordan's newly empowered parliament. The king has portrayed the assembly as a centerpiece of his reform package, but the opposition says it's not enough and vowed Thursday to stage more street protests. Initial results released Thursday showed the Islamists - who are not linked to the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood - and other opposition figures winning more than 25 percent of the 150-seat parliament, in sharp contrast to the outgoing legislature, which was almost entirely composed of the king's supporters.
NEWS
September 10, 1988 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
The white police and the black archbishop came face-to-face yesterday. The confrontation proved inconclusive, but the struggle between church and state in South Africa seemed to escalate another notch. The security police shadowed Archbishop Desmond Tutu all morning. He seemed to dare them to arrest him, but they merely looked on silently as he once again broke the law by urging blacks to boycott the government's segregated October elections. Then, as Archbishop Tutu prayed with church members in a downtown church, six plainclothes officers burst through the doors and videotaped the service.
NEWS
April 21, 1994
As what should have been its most triumphant moment approached, South Africa seemed prepared more for an apocalypse than an election. In dusty townships where voting has long been forbidden, the niceties of campaigning were breached. Candidates without local support were run out of town, often under protection of armored cars. Naive teenagers passing out nonpartisan voter-education leaflets were shot dead. And, having failed to win concessions at the bargaining table, Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi, the president of the Zulu-affiliated Inkatha Freedom Party, was threatening an election boycott that was going to spoil the celebration - and fuel the country's simmering civil war. Such was the grim scenario with a week to go before the historic vote.
NEWS
January 22, 1988 | By William Raspberry
When the Haitians tried, six weeks ago, to elect their first post-Duvalier government, the voters were there but the army wasn't. The result: 34 would-be voters killed and scores of others wounded in unchecked violence laid to the infamous tontons macoute. On their second attempt at political emancipation, last Sunday, the army was there but the voters weren't, having responded to some combination of physical fear and an opposition call for an election boycott. The result: an "election" whose results are utterly lacking in credibility.
NEWS
January 23, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A high-ranking official in the government of President Ferdinand E. Marcos resigned yesterday to join the presidential campaign of opposition candidate Corazon Aquino. Col. Mariana Santiago, a key military commander who also served as director of the Bureau of Land Transportation under Marcos, told a news conference that he was joining the opposition because the nation "is in a state of emergency. " "Under normal times I would not have taken this step, which I am very much aware is fraught with danger," he said.
NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Matthew Lee and Aya Batrawy, Associated Press
CAIRO - Egypt's bickering government and opposition need to overcome their differences to create "a sense of political and economic viability" if the country is to thrive as a democracy, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Saturday. He urged the two sides to compromise for the good of the country. In meetings with Egypt's foreign minister and opposition politicians, some of whom plan to boycott the coming parliamentary elections, Kerry said an agreement on economic reforms to seal a $4.8 billion International Monetary Fund loan package was critical.
NEWS
December 19, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
With their country on the brink of anarchy, the people of Sri Lanka are going to the polls today to elect a new president and to try to restore some order to this beautiful but murderously divided island. Sri Lankans officially will be choosing between two long-familiar politicians - incumbent Prime Minister Ranasinghe Premadasa and two-time former Prime Minister Sirimavo Bandaranaike. But unofficially, they will be deciding about something far more basic. With Tamil militants calling for an election boycott in the north, and leaders of a powerful and ruthless Sinhalese extremist group called the Janatha Vimukthi Peramuna (JVP)
NEWS
January 27, 2005 | By Hannah Allam and Steven Butler INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A big test of President Bush's initiative to promote democracy everywhere will come Sunday when Iraq holds its first elections since U.S. troops toppled Saddam Hussein's regime almost two years ago. Here are answers to some basic questions. What's the election for? Iraqis will elect an interim 275-member National Assembly that will have several important jobs. One is selecting a committee to draft a permanent constitution that will set rules for new elections next year. Another is to appoint a president and two vice presidents, posts likely to go to leaders from Iraq's three main ethnic groups - the majority Shiite Muslims, the Sunni Arab minority, and the Kurds.
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NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Matthew Lee and Aya Batrawy, Associated Press
CAIRO - Egypt's bickering government and opposition need to overcome their differences to create "a sense of political and economic viability" if the country is to thrive as a democracy, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Saturday. He urged the two sides to compromise for the good of the country. In meetings with Egypt's foreign minister and opposition politicians, some of whom plan to boycott the coming parliamentary elections, Kerry said an agreement on economic reforms to seal a $4.8 billion International Monetary Fund loan package was critical.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Jamal Halaby and Dale Gavlak, Associated Press
AMMAN, Jordan - The surprise victory of 37 Islamist and other government critics despite an election boycott injects a degree of dissent into Jordan's newly empowered parliament. The king has portrayed the assembly as a centerpiece of his reform package, but the opposition says it's not enough and vowed Thursday to stage more street protests. Initial results released Thursday showed the Islamists - who are not linked to the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood - and other opposition figures winning more than 25 percent of the 150-seat parliament, in sharp contrast to the outgoing legislature, which was almost entirely composed of the king's supporters.
NEWS
January 27, 2005 | By Hannah Allam and Steven Butler INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A big test of President Bush's initiative to promote democracy everywhere will come Sunday when Iraq holds its first elections since U.S. troops toppled Saddam Hussein's regime almost two years ago. Here are answers to some basic questions. What's the election for? Iraqis will elect an interim 275-member National Assembly that will have several important jobs. One is selecting a committee to draft a permanent constitution that will set rules for new elections next year. Another is to appoint a president and two vice presidents, posts likely to go to leaders from Iraq's three main ethnic groups - the majority Shiite Muslims, the Sunni Arab minority, and the Kurds.
NEWS
October 11, 2004 | By Malcolm Garcia INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A boycott of Afghanistan's surprisingly peaceful first presidential election began to unravel yesterday, when one of the 15 candidates challenging incumbent Hamid Karzai denied he was part of the protest. "Their position was different than mine," said Haji Mohammad Mohaqiq. "My position is to make a complaint within the system. There should be a complete investigation. " Afghan officials yesterday said there would be such an investigation. "There is going to be an independent commission made to investigate it," said electoral director Farooq Wardak.
NEWS
April 21, 1994
As what should have been its most triumphant moment approached, South Africa seemed prepared more for an apocalypse than an election. In dusty townships where voting has long been forbidden, the niceties of campaigning were breached. Candidates without local support were run out of town, often under protection of armored cars. Naive teenagers passing out nonpartisan voter-education leaflets were shot dead. And, having failed to win concessions at the bargaining table, Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi, the president of the Zulu-affiliated Inkatha Freedom Party, was threatening an election boycott that was going to spoil the celebration - and fuel the country's simmering civil war. Such was the grim scenario with a week to go before the historic vote.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | Daily News wire services
DURBAN CHIEF AGAIN CALLS FOR ZULU LAND In South Africa, Mangosuthu Buthelezi made a fresh call yesterday for a sovereign Zulu kingdom, saying he would only end his election boycott if the demand was met. The Zulu leader's statement appeared to be political brinksmanship in a bid to win concessions from the rival ANC as the deadline approached for parties to register for the nation's first all-race election in April. The African National Congress, South Africa's largest political group, is expected to win the election.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
By foot, by car and by military van, Salvadorans were to vote for a president today in an election offering the widest range of choices in decades. Politicians from both the left and the right have said they expected the ruling Christian Democratic Party to employ election fraud to remain in power. But U.S. Ambassador William Walker said yesterday that he expected the election to succeed President Jose Napoleon Duarte to be "true and clean," and that it would "prove the success of U.S. policy in El Salvador in the past eight years.
NEWS
December 19, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
With their country on the brink of anarchy, the people of Sri Lanka are going to the polls today to elect a new president and to try to restore some order to this beautiful but murderously divided island. Sri Lankans officially will be choosing between two long-familiar politicians - incumbent Prime Minister Ranasinghe Premadasa and two-time former Prime Minister Sirimavo Bandaranaike. But unofficially, they will be deciding about something far more basic. With Tamil militants calling for an election boycott in the north, and leaders of a powerful and ruthless Sinhalese extremist group called the Janatha Vimukthi Peramuna (JVP)
NEWS
September 10, 1988 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
The white police and the black archbishop came face-to-face yesterday. The confrontation proved inconclusive, but the struggle between church and state in South Africa seemed to escalate another notch. The security police shadowed Archbishop Desmond Tutu all morning. He seemed to dare them to arrest him, but they merely looked on silently as he once again broke the law by urging blacks to boycott the government's segregated October elections. Then, as Archbishop Tutu prayed with church members in a downtown church, six plainclothes officers burst through the doors and videotaped the service.
NEWS
January 22, 1988 | By William Raspberry
When the Haitians tried, six weeks ago, to elect their first post-Duvalier government, the voters were there but the army wasn't. The result: 34 would-be voters killed and scores of others wounded in unchecked violence laid to the infamous tontons macoute. On their second attempt at political emancipation, last Sunday, the army was there but the voters weren't, having responded to some combination of physical fear and an opposition call for an election boycott. The result: an "election" whose results are utterly lacking in credibility.
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