CollectionsElection Reform
IN THE NEWS

Election Reform

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 29, 2001 | By Dick Polman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite the Florida voting debacle, and similar problems encountered in November in other states, it appeared earlier this year that Congress had zero interest in reforming the cumbersome and often unreliable process by which Americans cast their ballots in national elections. But now the optimists seem to be in ascendance. The political climate has shifted - due in part to the seizure of Senate power by the Democrats - and this has boosted prospects for an election-reform bill, one with teeth that could make it easier for states to ensure that each qualified citizen has an equal chance to vote and have the vote counted.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | By Mark Fazlollah and Marc Duvoisin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Rendell will name an election-reform committee tomorrow, but its agenda will be significantly more limited than he indicated a month ago. The committee's mandate is expected to steer clear of any political decisions - such as whether the city commissioners should be elected or appointed, and whether political patronage should be barred from the city elections agency. And the committee's timetable for giving the mayor its recommendations will be considerably longer than Rendell had indicated.
NEWS
November 3, 2010
DID YOU VOTE YESTERDAY? Did you want to? There's no reason that any citizen should answer "No" to the first question and "Yes" to the second. A democratic society should make voting as easy and accessible as possible. The last time we checked, Pennsylvania was still a democratic society. And yet the state seems less than fully invested in making the levers of democracy available to its citizens. Some people don't vote because they don't care, or they think voting makes no difference, or they don't like any of their options.
NEWS
September 21, 1995
Couple years back, they stole an election in Philadelphia. Fraudulent absentee ballots, if you recall. Voters were coached and cajoled into marking their votes for one Bill Stinson, a Democratic state Senate hopeful. Others' ballots were forged, outright. So, it's to be expected if folks do a double-take now that an election- reform task force appointed by Mayor Rendell is proposing to loosen absentee balloting rules. Almost anybody would be able to vote by mail. But this is an election reform that calls for a second look: It turns out that what appears, at first, to go against common sense proves to be a policy that's becoming widely accepted elsewhere.
NEWS
February 23, 1998 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A long-promised debate on legislative proposals to reform the financing of federal election campaigns will get under way today in the Senate. But even some reform advocates are doubtful much progress can be made. For starters, Republicans and Democrats differ vehemently over what constitutes reform. Many officeholders do not want to tamper with a financing system that they have mastered and that assures their reelection. And the public appears to have given up on pressing Congress to produce reforms, despite being convinced that the current system is corrupt.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A group of community leaders yesterday called for election reform - including changing laws to allow absentee voting as a matter of convenience - as a remedy to the "cynicism and despair" created by last month's state Senate election in Philadelphia. Nineteen leaders, brought together by the Fellowship Commission and representing a wide spectrum of neighborhood, civil rights and ethnic groups, also called for a halt of the state attorney general's investigation into absentee ballot fraud in the Second Senate District.
NEWS
February 21, 1994 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Despite U.S. District Judge Clarence C. Newcomer's blistering opinion about the way the City Commission conducts elections, the reforms he has ordered may have little impact outside the area of absentee voting. In addition to his ruling Friday voiding the election of Democratic state Sen. William Stinson and ordering Republican Bruce Marks to be seated from the 2nd Senatorial District, Newcomer decreed numerous changes in the handling of absentee ballots. But absentee ballots rarely make a difference.
NEWS
April 23, 1998 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article contains information from Inquirer wire services
In a sudden and dramatic about-face, House Republican leaders agreed yesterday to resurrect campaign-finance reform next month for debate and a vote. House Speaker Newt Gingrich and his leadership team changed course after they became convinced they would lose control of the issue under mounting pressure from Democrats and a small but militant group of reform-minded Republicans who have been demanding a vote. Republican reformers hailed their leaders' concession "as a great day for democracy," as Rep. Christopher Shays (R., Conn.
NEWS
April 17, 2007
I WOULD LIKE THE Daily News to devote more coverage to these topics and ideas: 1. Lowering taxes. 2. The genocide occurring in the Darfur region of Sudan. 3. Outlawing abortion. 4. Reducing spending by the federal government. 5. Bringing all the troops in Iraq home. 6. Election reform in every state. 7. The amount of funding for the Veterans Administration, Department of Education and the military. 8. Balancing the federal budget. 9. Stopping the flow of illegal immigrants into the United States.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | By Frank Davies INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a breakthrough for election reform, key House members from both parties agreed yesterday on a comprehensive package that would set minimum standards for all elections and authorize $2.6 billion to help states and localities make changes. The bipartisan deal gives a real boost to prospects for passage of comprehensive election-reform legislation after many months when the effort appeared stalled in Congress. "This is the bill that has a pretty good chance of making it through this year," said Doug Chapin, director of the Election Reform Information Project, which monitors legislation on the subject.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Kaplan delivered a blunt message Wednesday to members of a presidential blue-ribbon panel on election reform. The 2012 vote in Philadelphia was a "national embarrassment" spoiled by massive confusion, partisanship, and mismanagement, said Kaplan, policy director of the watchdog group Committee of Seventy. She pointed to numbers such as the 26,986 provisional ballots cast, more than 12,000 of them by registered voters who should have been allowed to use voting machines, and almost 100 Republican poll inspectors who "were not permitted to sit" by their Democratic counterparts and had to get court orders.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Saying the measure would overwhelm local election workers, Gov. Christie vetoed Thursday a bill that would have required polls to open two weeks before Election Day. The bill won final passage in the Assembly on March 21. It would have required that each county open a limited number of polling places in advance of the election. Democrats touted the measure as a way to increase voter participation; Republicans panned it as a costly initiative that would add little in the way of expanded access for voters.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | BY WENDY R. WEISER
ON ELECTION DAY, millions of Americans stood in long lines at crowded polling stations to exercise their right to vote. Although most were ultimately able to cast a ballot, the long lines were a disgrace. As President Obama said that night, "We have to fix that. " I spent Election Day helping to field calls from voters across the country on behalf of the Election Protection Coalition, which runs the nation's largest non-partisan voter-protection hotline. I also monitored the election process and its problems throughout the lead-up to Nov. 6. These are the key takeaways.
NEWS
August 8, 2012
By Jonathan Zimmerman Once upon a time, American elections were rife with corruption. Party bosses bought votes with strong drink and cold cash, or stuffed ballot boxes with bogus names. Then along came the good-government reformers who cleaned up our democracy with new election laws and regulations. That's the story we all learned in high school. And it's true, up to a point. But it leaves out a crucial fact: Those measures also sought to bar certain people from the polls. The goal of election reform wasn't simply a clean vote; it was also to keep out the "wrong" kind of voter.
NEWS
November 3, 2010
DID YOU VOTE YESTERDAY? Did you want to? There's no reason that any citizen should answer "No" to the first question and "Yes" to the second. A democratic society should make voting as easy and accessible as possible. The last time we checked, Pennsylvania was still a democratic society. And yet the state seems less than fully invested in making the levers of democracy available to its citizens. Some people don't vote because they don't care, or they think voting makes no difference, or they don't like any of their options.
NEWS
September 23, 2008
WE NEED election reform, and we need it fast! Not tomorrow, not the next day, but right now. We need laws that have teeth. We want to know what you are going to do for us, not what the other guy did or didn't do. Talk about yourself, and your plans, not what your opponent does (or what you'd have us believe he or she did). Let him or her tell us what their plans are, not what you think they are. Tell us what your agenda is, and don't tell us what your opponent is going to do or not do. Anyone who talks trash about his or her opponent should be immediately banned from further campaigning.
NEWS
May 14, 2007 | Editor's note: This was submitted by Patricia DeCarlo, Marjorie Dugan, Germaine Ingram, Karen Spencer Kelly, Georgette A. Miller, Marilyn Monaco, Bethann R. Naples, Liz Werthan and Marsha Zibalese-Crawford. They are educators, lawyers, community leaders and advocates from all sections of the city
AS CONCERNED citizens, we believe that the recent developments in this primary election call for a thorough and comprehensive review. Some of the very initiatives and institutions established to reform the election process and ensure an open and fair election have in effect altered and manipulated the process, resulting in an election that continues to disappoint concerned citizens and voters. Philadelphians passed campaign-finance laws that targeted pay-to-play. The goal was well-intentioned - but, in actuality, these laws have not adequately addressed all situations.
NEWS
May 3, 2007 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayoral candidate Tom Knox yesterday unveiled his "reform ticket" in partnership with Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell - the only City Council member to vote against ethics reform. Knox - a businessman who has fashioned himself as an anti-corruption, anti-nepotism outsider - saw nothing incongruous in joining forces with Blackwell, an insider who inherited her political power from her spouse and stood alone in City Council two years ago to oppose campaign-finance limits. "We want to reform city government, and she's the best one to do it," said Knox, who said he would support a Blackwell bid to become president of City Council.
NEWS
April 17, 2007
I WOULD LIKE THE Daily News to devote more coverage to these topics and ideas: 1. Lowering taxes. 2. The genocide occurring in the Darfur region of Sudan. 3. Outlawing abortion. 4. Reducing spending by the federal government. 5. Bringing all the troops in Iraq home. 6. Election reform in every state. 7. The amount of funding for the Veterans Administration, Department of Education and the military. 8. Balancing the federal budget. 9. Stopping the flow of illegal immigrants into the United States.
NEWS
April 28, 2006
YOUR APRIL 27 article on City Council's consideration of public financing of campaigns stated that the concept was received with disdain by the Council members present. It was not disdain, but skepticism. The skepticism stems from the understanding that there is no one approach to election reform that will "level the playing field," including campaign-contribution limits. The political system in Philadelphia is in need of more comprehensive reform. I've lost to that system, beat it and used it to get re-elected - so I clearly know it well.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|