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BUSINESS
May 15, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Big stock-index funds and small investors joined forces to reelect incumbent DuPont Co. directors in a Wednesday vote at the company's Wilmington headquarters, pushing back a rival slate led by billionaire activist investor Nelson Peltz. After the vote, Peltz said that "the vast majority" of actively managed mutual funds and hedge funds had backed his slate. Vote totals were not released. "We won," company chair and chief executive Ellen Kullman crowed. "Apparently, we got their attention," she said, referring to the company's $15 million campaign to win support from retirees and other small investors, who own nearly one-third of DuPont's 900 million shares outstanding and had not voted much in recent elections.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | David Gambacorta, Daily News Staff Writer
SAM KATZ made up his mind last week: He was going to run for mayor. A campaign was going to whir to life - a big announcement, some red, white and blue "Katz for Mayor" posters, flurries of phone calls to deep-pocketed donors. And then he changed his mind. Katz, 65, said he flip-flopped over the weekend, deciding finally on Sunday night that he wouldn't launch a fourth attempt at becoming mayor, after all. He made it official in an email to reporters and supporters last night.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
With eight days to the primary, 23 candidates for City Council at-large seats are straining to get their names heard, and one is using a half-million-dollar bullhorn to blast his in television ads. Center City real estate broker Allan Domb, known as the "condo king," hit the airwaves with $500,000 worth of commercials - an unusual move in the less-followed (and lesser-funded) at-large race. Another candidate, lawyer Tom Wyatt, has a much smaller TV ad buy, as does the independent group Philly 3.0, which is advertising on behalf of its four endorsed at-large candidates.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
CHARTER OPERATOR ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania is seeking to block certification of a union at its Olney Charter High School, despite recent assurances that it would negotiate in good faith. ASPIRA filed a brief yesterday with the National Labor Relations Board asserting that the agency has no jurisdiction over a union vote because the North Philly school is a public entity and the NLRB's purview is limited to private-sector employees. The move comes a week after Olney Charter staffers voted, 104-38, in favor of a union after a three-year organizing effort.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY KIA HINTON & DAWN HAWKINS
AS African-Americans who advocate for students and parents in our communities, we find the notion that billionaire hedge-fund managers who live on the Main Line should decide who will be our next mayor and determine the shape of public education in our city troubling, to say the least. The three partners of the Susquehanna International Group - Joel Greenberg, Jeff Yass and Arthur Dantchik - poured $6 million into the failed gubernatorial bid of Anthony Hardy Williams and now are spending more millions to make him mayor.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | William Bender, Daily News Staff Writer
LAST NIGHT was supposed to be the big one. The final televised debate of the 2015 mayoral primary with the largest potential audience. The last chance for the six Democratic candidates to stand before legions of 6ABC viewers and separate themselves from the pack two weeks before Election Day. Didn't happen. Chalk it up to the impossibility of explaining complex policy proposals in less than a minute. Or maybe it was just debate fatigue. About 70 candidate forums have been held this year.
NEWS
May 1, 2015
THIS WEEK, the Supreme Court voted to uphold a Florida rule prohibiting judicial candidates from personally seeking campaign contributions. The court affirmed that those running for judge in Florida can't directly solicit money - but can write thank-you notes to donors. The ruling was especially welcome given the Court's recent history of decisions that support money's increasing influence in elections starting with, but not limited to, Citizens United. That decision opened the floodgates of independent political expenditures - including "dark money" - from corporations, unions and other organizations.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sean Brown, a former Camden school board member and a longtime critic of the district's leadership, this week began a grassroots campaign aimed at making the board an elected body, rather than a panel appointed by the mayor. Mayor Dana L. Redd has had the power to appoint all members of the board since 2010, when the state takeover of the city ended and Camden became a Type 1 school district dependent on its municipal government. Before that, the board was made up of a combination of members appointed by the governor and the mayor, as well as several who were elected.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
CITY COMMISSIONER Stephanie Singer is gearing up for a fight to get her name back on the May 19 primary ballot after a judge yesterday officially removed her for failing to have enough valid voter signatures on her nominating petitions. Singer, who was elected in 2011 to the three-member board that oversees city elections, had just 996 signatures as of late last week, four short of the 1,000 required to remain on the ballot. She initially had close to 1,530 signatures, but that number dropped during a series of challenges last week before Common Pleas Judge Joel Johnson, who signed the order ousting Singer.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephanie Singer's short and rocky career as a Philadelphia city commissioner hung on just a handful of signatures as a judge heard testimony late into Thursday night on a challenge aimed at removing her from the ballot. Singer needs 1,000 valid signatures from registered Democrats on nomination petitions to remain on the party's May 19 primary ballot in her bid for a second term. She submitted 1,485 signatures. Richard Hoy, the lawyer for the challengers, said late Thursday that Singer had 1,005 signatures remaining after more than 400 were withdrawn by her or stricken by Common Pleas Court Judge Joel Johnson during the four-day hearing.
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