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NEWS
June 14, 2014
ISSUE | ELECTIONS Sent packing Three cheers for Virginia Republicans, who sent a crystal-clear message with the primary upset of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor ("Stunning defeat for GOP's Cantor," June 11). Crony capitalism doesn't fly with Americans left or right, whether it's banks being bailed out or another amnesty bill for illegal immigrants. The politicians reap the rewards of amnesty in the form of political donations, and the American people suffer the consequences in the form of lower wages, strained social services, and minorities being pushed out of the labor market.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Chris Brennan
DEMOCRATIC and Republican committee people who won posts in the primary election 17 days ago will soon elect ward leaders, but a few protesters want to call a halt until their complaints are investigated. The aggrieved spoke of primary polling-place harassment and electioneering during a hearing yesterday called by City Commissioner Stephanie Singer . This Airing of Grievances - sadly, with no Seinfeldian feats of strength or Festivus pole - stirred a dozen people to march from the City Hall courtroom, where Singer sat as judge, to District Attorney Seth Williams ' office across the street.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
A city election official who was previously fined by Philadelphia's Board of Ethics for using her office computer to engage in political activity is in hot water again with the same board - and has had her computer confiscated. Tracey Gordon, who has been a deputy to City Commissioner Stephanie Singer, has been placed on unpaid administrative leave. According to an e-mail sent Thursday to the three commissioners by Chief Deputy Commissioner Don Garecht, Gordon was suspended without pay for 90 days pending an investigation by the Ethics Board.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Republican nominee for the congressional seat being relinquished by U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz said that if he is elected, he will donate his salary to charities in Northeast Philadelphia and eastern Montgomery County. Dee Adcock, 62, a Montgomery County businessman, made the announcement Wednesday. "If you send me to Washington, while I'm working to fix the system to restore the American dream for the forgotten worker, I will donate my entire after-tax paycheck to local charitable organizations in Northeast Philly and Montgomery County," he said.
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Chris Brennan
IT'S TRADITION - like chopped liver on rye - for Clout to question the politicians on Election Day at the Famous 4th Street Deli. We ask everyone the same three questions. The answers - and the dodges - are revealing. Yesterday's questions were: * Who will the candidates be for mayor of Philadelphia next year and who is the front-runner? * Can Democratic nominee Tom Wolf defeat Gov. Corbett in the November general election? * Who would win an arm-wrestling match between electricians union chief John Dougherty and carpenters union leader Ed Coryell ?
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THE NOVEMBER election for governor will give Pennsylvania voters a real choice. They can elect the man with a lot of money. Or they can elect the man who's very popular with other rich people. The 2014 contest between newly minted Democratic nominee Tom Wolf - a once-obscure businessman who used $10 million of his own money to buy instant name ID - and GOP incumbent Gov. Corbett, who's adept at wooing big-ticket donations from energy executives and other business leaders, is already the exclamation point on that "big money is way too big in Pennsylvania" politics.
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bitter three-way race that involved some of the city's most powerful political players, State Sen. Christine Tartaglione cruised to a surprisingly easy victory in the Democratic primary Tuesday. She collected slightly more than half of the vote in the Second Senatorial District, which stretches from Kensington to Fox Chase, besting Daniel Savage, a former City Council member, and Tomas Sánchez, husband of Councilwoman Maria Quiñones Sánchez. The rough-and-tumble race featured big money, prominent endorsements, and plenty of attack ads. The district also was one of the hottest areas in the city for complaints of election shenanigans, said Ellen Mattleman Kaplan of the watchdog group Committee of Seventy.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
  A relatively small Philadelphia union has become the biggest independent source of campaign money in the state. Local 98 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers has poured $25.6 million into political races since 2000, an Inquirer analysis of campaign records found - more than statewide powerhouses such as the trial lawyers, teachers' unions, or Marcellus Shale gas drillers. The donations, financed by members' paycheck deductions, have helped turn the local and its business manager, John J. Dougherty Jr., into a potent and even feared political force.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
I KNOW you're all fiercely focused on the Democratic primary for governor. It's got snappy TV ads, a final debate tonight at Drexel University and actual voting just a week away. And it's been a blast. Started with rich guy Tom Wolf smiling, waving, driving a Jeep; ending with Rob McCord throwing race bombs, Allyson Schwartz dealing gender cards and Katie McGinty watching both play "Let's Tar Tom. " But, listen: As you're sorting it out and wondering about the nature of elective politics in America, I hope you'll consider other races.
NEWS
May 11, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - For the second year in a row, candidates endorsed by an alumni group dissatisfied with Pennsylvania State University's handling of the child sexual abuse scandal swept the elections for three open seats on the Board of Trustees. Their selection almost certainly means that the voice calling for late football coach Joe Paterno to be honored and the university to be exonerated will grow louder in the coming months, especially with the heft of a major financial figure, a former state senator, and a professor.
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